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Communities of Learned Experience: Epistolary Medicine in the Renaissance (Singleton Center Books in Premodern Europe) epub

by Nancy G. Siraisi


Communities of Learned Experience: Epistolary Medicine in the Renaissance (Singleton Center Books in Premodern Europe) epub

ISBN: 1421407493

ISBN13: 978-1421407494

Author: Nancy G. Siraisi

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (December 1, 2012)

Pages: 176 pages

ePUB book: 1430 kb

FB2 book: 1917 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 769

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About the book: The essays in this volume explore the various means by which communities in nineteenth and twentieth-century Europe were subject to forms of discipline, noting how the communities themselves generated their own forms of internal control.

About the book: The essays in this volume explore the various means by which communities in nineteenth and twentieth-century Europe were subject to forms of discipline, noting how the communities themselves generated their own forms of internal control. What type of file do you want? RIS. BibTeX.

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Siraisi uses some of these collections to compare approaches to sharing . She is author of History, Medicine, and the Traditions of Renaissance.

Siraisi uses some of these collections to compare approaches to sharing medical knowledge across broad regions of Europe and within a city, with the goal of illuminating geographic differences as well as diversity within social, urban, courtly, and academic environments. The collections she has selected include essays on general medical topics addressed to colleagues or disciples, some advice for individual patients (usually written at the request of the patient’s doctor), and a strong dose of controversy. Nancy G. Siraisi is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the City University of New York. She is author of History, Medicine, and the Traditions of Renaissance Learning.

Communities of Learned Experience: Epistolary Medicine in the Renaissance. Singleton Center Books in Pre-Modern Europe. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013. Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions and Smithsonian Institution.

Similar books and articles. History, Medicine, and the Traditions of Renaissance Learning. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2007.

Communities of Learned Experience : Epistolary Medicine in the Renaissance. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Series: Singleton Center Books in Premodern Europe Ser. Subjects: Physicians - history - Europe. Main Author: Siraisi, Nancy G. Other Authors: Staff, Charles Singleton Center for the Study of Pre-Modern Europe.

Communities of Learned Experience: Epistolary Medicine in the Renaissance. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013, ISBN 978-1421407494.

Goeing, Anja-Silvia (2013) Communities of Learned Experience. PDF Goeing, Anja-Silvia (Siraisi) 1 Aug 2013. pdf - Accepted Version Restricted to Repository staff only Download (62kB). Epistolary Medicine in the Renaissance, Singleton Center Books in Premodern Europe. Sixteenth Century Journal, 44 (4). ISSN 0361-0160.

During the Renaissance, collections of letters both satisfied humanist enthusiasm for ancient literary forms and provided the flexibility of a format appropriate to many types of inquiry. The printed collections of medical letters by Giovanni Manardo of Ferrara and other physicians in early sixteenth-century Europe may thus be regarded as products of medical humanism. The letters of mid- and late sixteenth-century Italian and German physicians examined in Communities of Learned Experience by Nancy G. Siraisi also illustrate practices associated with the concepts of the Republic of Letters: open and relatively informal communication among a learned community and a liberal exchange of information and ideas. Additionally, such published medical correspondence may often have served to provide mutual reinforcement of professional reputation.

Siraisi uses some of these collections to compare approaches to sharing medical knowledge across broad regions of Europe and within a city, with the goal of illuminating geographic differences as well as diversity within social, urban, courtly, and academic environments. The collections she has selected include essays on general medical topics addressed to colleagues or disciples, some advice for individual patients (usually written at the request of the patient’s doctor), and a strong dose of controversy.