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The American Dream in the Great Depression. (Contributions in American Studies) epub

by Charles Hearn,Robert H. Walker


The American Dream in the Great Depression. (Contributions in American Studies) epub

ISBN: 0837194784

ISBN13: 978-0837194783

Author: Charles Hearn,Robert H. Walker

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Praeger (June 6, 1977)

Pages: 222 pages

ePUB book: 1197 kb

FB2 book: 1838 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 941

Other Formats: doc docx lrf mobi





Start by marking The American Dream In The Great Depression as. .Read by Charles R. Hearn.

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The Depression tested the tenets of the American Dream for many Americans, as Studs Terkel found out in Hard Times; but his interviews also demolish the simple equation that some would attribute to the Dream. Authors and Affiliations. 1. aint Martin’s UniversityLaceyUSA. Do you want to read the rest of this chapter? Request full-text.

Hearn, Charles R. Publication date. American literature, National characteristics, American, in literature, Depressions, Success in literature, American literature, Civilization, Depressions, National characteristics, American, in literature, Success in literature, American dream, Literatur,, Littřature amřicaine, Crises čonomiques, American literature 20th century History and criticism, Depressions 1929 United States, National characteristics, American, in literature, Success in literature, United States Civilization 1918-1945.

The American spiritual depression and the decline of Prot-estantism in the 1920's were intimately correlated. It was on churches already seriously weakened, already in some decline, that the blow of economic depression fell. When the Lynds re-turned to Middletown ten years after their first study they found that "the city had been shaken for nearly six years by a catastrophe in-volving not only people's values but, in the case of many, their very ex-istence

This era in American literature is responsible for notable first works, such as the first American .

This era in American literature is responsible for notable first works, such as the first American comedy written for the stage-"The Contrast" by Royall Tyler, written in 1787-and the first American Novel-"The Power of Sympathy" by William Hill, written in 1789. Furthermore, the Great Depression and the New Deal resulted in some of America’s greatest social issue writing, such as the novels of Faulkner and Steinbeck, and the drama of Eugene O’Neill. The Beat Generation (1944–1962). Beat writers, such as Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, were devoted to anti-traditional literature, in poetry and prose, and anti-establishment politics.

Dickstein, Susman, and American Studies scholar Charles Hearn exemplify Carnegie as the barker of positive thinking. Carnegie offered authority - and economic gain - to anyone who read and practiced his principles

Dickstein, Susman, and American Studies scholar Charles Hearn exemplify Carnegie as the barker of positive thinking. Carnegie offered authority - and economic gain - to anyone who read and practiced his principles. But Hearn cautions, Carnegie’s doctrines also seem to assume an audience in whom confusion, frustration, and uncertainty of the Depression have helped to create a fear rising above others and a need for the security of longing

Other contributions to American life. The Great Depression of the 1930s worsened the already bleak economic situation of African Americans. In the presidential election of 1928 African Americans voted in large numbers for the Democrats for the first time. In 1930 Republican Pres.

Other contributions to American life. They were the first to be laid off from their jobs, and they suffered from an unemployment rate two to three times that of whites. In early public assistance programs African Americans often received substantially less aid than whites, and some charitable organizations even excluded blacks from their soup kitchens.

Analyzes contemporary drama, fiction, and popular works in order to show how the Depression affected the myth of success, and looks at the values, attitudes, and motivations of Americans during that period