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Dangerous Liaisons: Sex and Love in the Segregated South epub

by Charles F. Robinson II


Dangerous Liaisons: Sex and Love in the Segregated South epub

ISBN: 155728833X

ISBN13: 978-1557288332

Author: Charles F. Robinson II

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press; 1 edition (August 2, 2006)

Pages: 160 pages

ePUB book: 1976 kb

FB2 book: 1579 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 982

Other Formats: txt azw mbr docx





Segregation?and race itself?was based on the idea that interracial sex posed a biological threat to the white race. Dangerous Liaisons vividly documents the regulation of intimacy and its fundamental role in the construction of race.

Segregation?and race itself?was based on the idea that interracial sex posed a biological threat to the white race. In this groundbreaking study, Charles Robinson examines how white southerners enforced anti-miscegenation laws. His findings challenge conventional wisdom, documenting a pattern of selective prosecution under which interracial domestic relationships were punished even more harshly than transient sexual encounters.

Charles Robinson II perceptively begins his book on interracial relationships in the American South with the observation that . Citation: Joan Johnson.

Charles Robinson II perceptively begins his book on interracial relationships in the American South with the observation that "the rhetoric of the white South about interracial sex differed significantly from its actions with regards to prevention" (p. xiii). His book is a brief but thorough analysis of the Southern reaction to interracial romances from the end of the Civil War through the 1920s. Robinson sets up six themes that guide his analysis throughout the book.

In the South after the Civil War, segregation-and race itself-was based on the idea that interracial sex posed a biological threat to the white race. In this groundbreaking book, Charles Robinson examines how white southerners enforced antimiscegenation laws. His findings challenge conventional wisdom, documenting a pattern of selective prosecutions under which interracial domestic relationships were punished even more harshly than transient sexual encounters.

Dangerous Liaisons book. In this groundbreaking study, Charles Robinson examines how white so In the tumultuous decades after the Civil War, as the southern white elite reclaimed power, racial mixing was the central concern of segregationists who strove to maintain racial purity. Segregation-and race itself-was based on the idea that interracial sex posed a biological threat to the white race.

André Luiz Moraes Ramos.

Segregation-and race itself-was based on the idea that interracial sex posed a biological threat to the white race.

Dangerous Liaisons makes clear that southern legislatures and courts selectively enforced their . Citation: Elizabeth Alexander.

Citation: Elizabeth Alexander. Charles F. Robinson II. ISBN-13. Robinson examines legal cases from across the South, considering both criminal prosecutions brought by states and civil disputes over marital and family assets.

Les Liaisons dangereuses is a French epistolary novel by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, first published in four volumes by Durand Neveu from March 23, 1782. It is the story of the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont, two narcissistic rivals. It is the story of the Marquise de Merteuil and the Vicomte de Valmont, two narcissistic rivals (and ex-lovers) who use seduction as a weapon to socially control and exploit others, all the while enjoying their cruel games and boasting about their manipulative talents.

No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means, including . Published simultaneously in Canada. Printed in the United States of America.

These pieces originally appeared in The New York Observer. The strappy sandal logo, which was modeled on one of Ms. Bushnell’s very own shoes, accompanies her Sex and the City column.

In the tumultuous decades after the Civil War, as the southern white elite reclaimed power, “racial mixing” was the central concern of segregationists who strove to maintain “racial purity.” Segregation—and race itself—was based on the idea that interracial sex posed a biological threat to the white race. In this groundbreaking study, Charles Robinson examines how white southerners enforced anti-miscegenation laws. His findings challenge conventional wisdom, documenting a pattern of selective prosecution under which interracial domestic relationships were punished even more harshly than transient sexual encounters. Robinson shows that the real crime was to suggest that black and white individuals might be equals, a notion which undermined the legitimacy of the economic, political, and social structure of white male supremacy.

Robinson examines legal cases from across the South, considering both criminal prosecutions brought by states and civil disputes over marital and family assets. He also looks at U.S. Supreme Court decisions, debates in state legislatures, comments in the U.S. Congressional Record, and newspaper editorials. He not only shows the hardening of racial categories but assesses the attitudes of African Americans about anti-miscegenation laws and intermarriage. The epilogue concerns “The Demise of Anti-miscegenation Law” including the case of Richard and Mildred Loving.

Dangerous Liaisons vividly documents the regulation of intimacy and its fundamental role in the construction of race.