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The English Constitution epub

by Walter Bagehot


The English Constitution epub

ISBN: 1406504386

ISBN13: 978-1406504385

Author: Walter Bagehot

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Dodo Press (January 31, 2006)

Pages: 220 pages

ePUB book: 1723 kb

FB2 book: 1639 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 601

Other Formats: lrf mobi txt doc





The English Constitution. all essentials as it was at first written, and to describe shortly such changes either in the Constitution itself, or in the Constitutions compared with it, as seem material.

The English Constitution. There are in this book various expressions which al-lude to persons who were living and to events which were happening when it first appeared; and I have carefully preserved these. They will serve to warn the reader what time he is reading about, and to prevent his mistaking the date at which the likeness was attempted to be taken.

The English Constitution is a book by Walter Bagehot

The English Constitution is a book by Walter Bagehot.

Walter Bagehot The English Constitution . Now, no doubt, this might have happened under a Parliamentary government. But, then, many members of Parliament, the entire Opposition in Parliament, would have been active to unravel the matter. All the principles of finance would have been worked and propounded. He will see in the life much which is not in the books; and he will not find in the rough practice many refinements of the literary theory. No one can approach to an understanding of the English institutions, or of others, which, being the growth of many centuries, exercise a wide sway over mixed populations, unless he divide them into two classes.

The English Constitution' by Walter Bagehot. Published by Good Press

The English Constitution' by Walter Bagehot. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre.

Стр. 70 - There are two great objects which every constitution must attain to be successful, which every old and celebrated one must have wonderfully achieved : every constitution must first gain authority and then use authority ; it must first win the loyalty and confidence of mankind, and then employ that homage in the work of government.

British journalist WALTER BAGEHOT (1826-1877) . Chronicling the past is much easier than chronicling the present, which was exactly Walter Bagehot's project when writing The English Constitution, first published in 1873.

He is also the author of Physics and Politics (1872) and The Postulates of English Political Economy (1885). His ambitious undertaking was to describe the British government as it actually worked during 1865 and 1866. Government as it functions is very different from the government as it is spelled out on paper.

Walter Bagehot was a journalist and a social and political thinker of the middle Victorian period (1850s and 1860s). His classical work "The English Constitution" comes as a collection of polemical assays upon the structure of the British political system

Walter Bagehot was a journalist and a social and political thinker of the middle Victorian period (1850s and 1860s). His classical work "The English Constitution" comes as a collection of polemical assays upon the structure of the British political system. Cabinet, monarchy, Houses of Commons and Lords, execution of political power, and the foundation of the systems of checks and balances are explored in the book. Throughout the book a comparison and contrast of Cabinet system and the Presidential system (. a USA) is a constant theme

30 quotes from Walter Bagehot: 'The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot d., 'Life is a compromise of. .The reason why so few good books are written is that so few people who can write know anything. tags: books, writing.

30 quotes from Walter Bagehot: 'The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot d., 'Life is a compromise of what your ego wants to do, what experience tells you to do, and what your nerves let you d., and 'The reason why so few good books are written is that so few people who can write know anything The reason why so few good books are written is that so few people who can write know anything.

Large Format for easy reading. By the nineteenth century British economist and author. Explores the constitution, specifically the functioning of Parliament and the British monarchy and the contrasts between British and American government. It remains the best account of the history and working of the British political system.
This is a fantastic collection of essays written by one of the foremost scholars on the English constitution in modern history. Bagehot can be difficult to read and follow along to, but having immense interest in British politics and the institutions of Crown and Government, how they work together and serve purpose to one another this is a very interesting book to have. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in studying such institutions.
Still arguably the leading exposition of the traditions, common law, historical Parliamentary acts, concessions of the crown (most famously, Magna Carta), and usages that comprise the nation's unwritten "constitution," as England uses that term. The writing seems stilted by modern standards and the journalistic approach overly respectful of ruling class sensibilities, perhaps, again by modern standards. But a foundational work and an ambitious one in its day all the same. I rate it highly not because it is great literature or even great scholarship, but because I think it endures as important in this area.
I thought this would actually be a source for the English Constitution. Instead it is a rambling essay on the changes between 2 decades at the end of the 19th century. It is totally worthless for my purpose.
Walter Bagehot was a journalist and a social and political thinker of the middle Victorian period (1850s and 1860s). His classical work "The English Constitution" comes as a collection of polemical assays upon the structure of the British political system. Cabinet, monarchy, Houses of Commons and Lords, execution of political power, and the foundation of the systems of checks and balances are explored in the book.
Throughout the book a comparison and contrast of Cabinet system and the Presidential system (a.k.a USA) is a constant theme. Bagehot does not hide it preference for the Cabinet system, which in his view is a both more dynamic and more effective. One of his main points is that direct popular election is a myth, since most of the electorate are ignorant of the nature of the political power (and moreover are forced to this ignorance by the effective uselessness of the legislative debate in the USA as opposed to the UK). Moreover, a result of the direct election is a static Presidential term of 4 years, which allows the executive branch to execute almost unchecked control of the political process. According to Bagehot, the indirect electoral system of the Commons, where people vote for the MPs and they then select the PM amongst themselves produces a more effective government, which is more responsive to the popular will since it can fall at any time due to policy disputes. A hidden secret of British success according to Bagehot is a fusion of legislative and executive powers in the Cabinet system. In the latter chapters, Bagehot exposures two forms of power - the dignified power (in the person of the monarch and the lords) and the effective power as exemplified by the Cabinet. Dignified power serves as a façade of legitimacy under which the dynamic and opportunist real effective power can subsist. He follows through to explain how each of the minister of the government exercises its power for the common goal, what are the legal powers of the monarchy and how it is exercised indirectly via control of the composition of the peerage and the power to dissolve the Commons.
Bagehot's style is clear, flavorful, his knowledge of political process is profound (with a qualification of more so of British then American), his research is well done, and he is a master of dramatic tricks to keep the reader interested. I would recommend the book as both a scholarly reference, and a well presented popular case.
First, to the reviewer looking for the doctrine of separation of powers: you'll find it in Montequieu's "Spirit of the Laws". Also check out "The Federalist", number 51.
Now then, Bagehot, like Madison, describes the operation of a modern liberal regime. The trick for founders of liberal government is to produce a government that permits the people civil liberties, but does not permit the people to abuse those liberties, or in the words of Madison, to create a government that is "democratic yet decent". Madison and the American Founders accomplish this end by so constructing the institutions of government that mens' selfish natures will be turned against each other ("ambition is made to check ambition"), rather than united in tyrannical concert.
Bagehot too describes the operation of a system of government that rules by the consent of the governed, yet which does so by restraining the vices of those who ought not to rule. Bagehot argues that the English government is moderate and decent because of a division of government into the "dignified" and the "efficient" parts, and a "noble lie" about the relationship between the two. It is this noble lie that permits the government to operate without the interference of those who would turn it away from the public good. But to discover the noble lie, you'll have to read Bagehot.
Warner Winborne
Professor of Political Science
Hampden-Sydney College
Hampden-Sydney, VA
If this is the unaltered version of the book of the same name and same author that I read about 30 years ago, it is a classic. It describes how the classic English Constitution worked, before Britain joined the European Union. Especially it explained how it worked without being written down, largely by constitutional convention which was morally binding but (quite often) not legally binding.