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Stoicism and Emotion epub

by Margaret Graver


Stoicism and Emotion epub

ISBN: 0226305570

ISBN13: 978-0226305578

Author: Margaret Graver

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (September 15, 2007)

Pages: 272 pages

ePUB book: 1489 kb

FB2 book: 1384 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 659

Other Formats: mbr txt lrf txt





Graver goes into great details from linguistic usage of stoic terms to the sources of ancient stoic philosophers to explain what the stoics thought about emotions.

Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Graver goes into great details from linguistic usage of stoic terms to the sources of ancient stoic philosophers to explain what the stoics thought about emotions. In this sense, I admire this book. However, despite this impressive scholarly work, the book is rather dry and dull from the stylistic point of view.

Professor Margaret Graver is one of the best known and respected scholars on Stoicism and ancient philosophy. She is the author of the popular academic text Stoicism and Emotion, in which she disproves the myth of Stoicism as a philosophy advocating being emotionless. Currently, Professor Graver is Aaron Lawrence Professor in Classics at Dartmouth, where she offers a variety of courses on Greek and Roman Philosophy, Plato, Aristotle, and Latin literature.

The mechanism of emotions in Stoicism has been presented by Graver a decade ago as relying on a pathetic . It is true that each emotion is an irrational impulse resulting not only from the opinion that something is good.

The mechanism of emotions in Stoicism has been presented by Graver a decade ago as relying on a pathetic syllogism having as its premises a judgment about the goodness of a certain type of object and a judgment that it is proper to have a certain emotional response to that object. but also from the opinion that it is appropriate to have a certain type of emotional response to that object, as shown by Graver.

On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. In this elegant and clearly written work, Margaret Graver gives a compelling new interpretation of the Stoic position. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Drawing on a vast range of ancient sources, she argues that the chief demand of Stoic ethics is not that we should suppress or deny our feelings, but that we should perfect the rational mind at the core of every human being.

Stoicism and Emotion book.

Margaret Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (Chicago, University Of Chicago Press, 2007). Jonas Salzgeber, The Little Book Of Stoicism (2019). Ryan Holiday, Stillness is the Key (Profile Books, 2019). M. Andrew Holowchak, The Stoics. A Guide for the Perplexed (London: Continuum, 2008).

Stoicism and Emotion is organized in nine chapters, and from the look of it, I will have to devote a post to each, since Graver’s treatment is in-depth and requires some time to unpack. Margaret carefully explains the Stoic theory that there is a single substance permeating the universe, the pneuma (literally, breath), a mixture of fire and air, two of the classical four primordial elements.

Stoicism - Stoicism, a school of Hellenistic philosophy, was founded in Athens by Zeno of Citium in the early third century BC. It concerns the active relationship between cosmic determinism and human freedom.

Stoicism - /stoh euh siz euhm/, n. 1. a systematic philosophy, dating from around 300 . that held the principles of logical thought to reflect a cosmic reason instantiated in nature. conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, a. Universalium.

Home Browse Books Book details, Stoicism and Emotion . Stoicism and Emotion. By Margaret R. Graver.

On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms.

On the surface, stoicism and emotion seem like contradictory terms. Yet the Stoic philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome were deeply interested in the emotions, which they understood as complex judgments about what we regard as valuable in our surroundings. Stoicism and Emotion shows that they did not simply advocate an across-the-board suppression of feeling, as stoicism implies in today’s English, but instead conducted a searching examination of these powerful psychological responses, seeking to understand what attitude toward them expresses the deepest respect for human potential.In this elegant and clearly written work, Margaret Graver gives a compelling new interpretation of the Stoic position. Drawing on a vast range of ancient sources, she argues that the chief demand of Stoic ethics is not that we should suppress or deny our feelings, but that we should perfect the rational mind at the core of every human being. Like all our judgments, the Stoics believed, our affective responses can be either true or false and right or wrong, and we must assume responsibility for them. Without glossing over the difficulties, Graver also shows how the Stoics dealt with those questions that seem to present problems for their theory: the physiological basis of affective responses, the phenomenon of being carried away by one’s emotions, the occurrence of involuntary feelings and the disordered behaviors of mental illness. Ultimately revealing the deeper motivations of Stoic philosophy, Stoicism and Emotion uncovers the sources of its broad appeal in the ancient world and illuminates its surprising relevance to our own.
This book carefully assembles the evidence for a vivid and balanced analysis of the ancient Stoic account of emotion. It shows how the ancient Stoic account endorses a richly varied emotional life while at the same time the modulation or even extirpation of destructive passions. Others have speculated that this was in fact what the Stoics meant to do, but they have mostly relied on evidence from late or Roman stoicism. This book shows that the evidence for such an account is there in the Old Stoa as well.
She lays out her arguments and presentation very clearly. You can read this book and get a sense of how does an enlightened man, whether a Buddhist, Stoic or Christian, relate to reality.

I'm happy to have this book, because Graver covers Seneca's writings - especially good is the section on bestial behavior - and although I'll read Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius, I may not get to Seneca.
A very rigorous, robust, nuanced, thorough and informative account on Stoic thought on emotions. Graver goes into great details from linguistic usage of stoic terms to the sources of ancient stoic philosophers to explain what the stoics thought about emotions. Graver even tries to give a very charitable account in order to dispel myths and misconceptions about how the Stoics view emotions. In this sense, I admire this book. However, despite this impressive scholarly work, the book is rather dry and dull from the stylistic point of view. I can only say that reading this book takes a lot of effort, attention, and patience but to be realistic this wouldn't be for the general audience. Nonetheless, the book is worth reading if anyone does have an investing interest in stoicism, I will only caution that person to take time reading the book.
The word stoic has come to connote someone who is impermeable in the face of circumstance and almost without emotion. That impression is not what the early Stoics meant to convey. Professor Graver provides a detailed and comprehensive account, much involving the fruit of research of original works, of what Stoics really taught about emotions and how humans should or should not react to certain types of events or objects. The wise person for Stoics is someone who knows what is truly good or evil, and those are things only over which someone has direct control - what you think or what you do. Other things, like wealth, fame, etc. are external which are not intrinsically good or evil; when they, or their opposites occur, they do not require the attention and emotion that most of us assign them. The only things we need to be concerned about are the virtues which are under our control and the things we do that move us towards those virtues (that's how I interpret it and if I were in Prof. Graver's class, she may correct me). Stoics did allow for emotion in the natural life of people; they even conceded something like pre-emotions for situations where anyone would likely react, like the sounds of an explosion, for example, by trembling or such, without assenting to the emotion of fear. An assent is the key here, which is the volitional surrender, almost, to a particular emotion based on irrational thought; that is, succumbing to fear when fear is not called for, or labeling something as evil that really isn't and then following that valuation to its logical emotional conclusion.

There was a lot in this that is really for academics studying the depths and sources of stoic philosophy. But for anyone like myself looking to grow my intellectual philosophical muscles, this is a good work to push a little harder - it's challenging but not overwhelming. I would like to see in the future Graver or someone equally qualified write a more accessible how-to or self-help book based on stoicism. I think it would do a world of good for our shallow and confused world.
Professor Graver is an exceptionally clear thinker and thoroughly active mind. Her insights into stoicism will tickle your ocular nerves.
Graver's precise examination of stoicism's engagement with emotion provides a set of crucial concepts for better understanding stoic philosophy. Stoicism's historical impact on western thought makes Graver's book a must read.
So I got this thinking it would be great to learn more about Stoicism as a philosophy...this book really doesn't do a great job of explaining the philosophy for non-academics. There were scant examples that related Stoic philosophy into something a lay person could understand. I really wish this were written clearer. But, if you think yourself a philosopher, maybe you would enjoy the depth of this book.