» » Efficiency, Equality and Public Policy: With a Case for Higher Public Spending

Efficiency, Equality and Public Policy: With a Case for Higher Public Spending epub

by NA NA


Efficiency, Equality and Public Policy: With a Case for Higher Public Spending epub

ISBN: 031223208X

ISBN13: 978-0312232085

Author: NA NA

Category: Other

Subcategory: Business & Finance

Language: English

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2000 edition (August 18, 2000)

Pages: 189 pages

ePUB book: 1790 kb

FB2 book: 1243 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 902

Other Formats: azw lrf lit mobi





It is true that much of public spending involves some waste and inefficiency. East-Asian Happiness Gap. Article. The present paper speculates on the reasons for this East-Asian happiness gap, including environmental disruption, excessive competitiveness, repressive education, excessive conformity, negative attitudes towards enjoyment, and the emphasis on outward appearance.

Public Sector Public Good Marginal Cost Public Expenditure Government Spending. Ng Y. Ng S. (2000) A Case for Higher Public Spending. In: Efficiency, Equality and Public Policy. These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. Palgrave Macmillan, London. 1057/9780333992777 8.

Despite some inefficiency in public spending, higher public spending is likely to be more welfare-improving than .

Despite some inefficiency in public spending, higher public spending is likely to be more welfare-improving than private spending. in countries that are no longer poor, further increases in private consumption fail to increase happiness. the small consumption effect may be more than offset by the negative environment disruption effect. People still engage in the rat race for making more money mainly due to competition and the related relative-income effects.

This book provides compelling arguments for the exclusive concern with efficiency ('a dollar is a dollar') in all specific areas of public economic policy, leaving the objective of equality . With a Case for Higher Public Spending.

This book provides compelling arguments for the exclusive concern with efficiency ('a dollar is a dollar') in all specific areas of public economic policy, leaving the objective of equality to be achi.

Start by marking Efficiency, Equality and Public Policy: With a. .Public policies, the author argues, should ultimately maximize the sum of individual welfares which should be individual happiness rather than preferences.

Start by marking Efficiency, Equality and Public Policy: With a Case for Higher Public Spending as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The flip side is that relative-income and environmental disruption effects cause a bias in favor of private spending which is no longer conducive to social happiness.

With a Case for Higher Public Spending. Policy sciences, Economic policy, Decision making, Public Expenditures. There's no description for this book yet. by Yew-Kwang Ng. Published June 2000 by Palgrave MacMillan Policy sciences, Economic policy, Decision making, Public Expenditures.

Is Public Spending Good for You?," World Economics, 2(2), pp. 1–17, with Harold Bierman. Efficiency, Equality, and Public Policy: With a Case for Higher Public Spending (London: Macmillan). From Preference to Happiness: Towards a More Complete Welfare Economics, Social Choice and Welfare, 20(2), pp. 307-350. Mistakes in Economics by the Public, Students, Economists and Nobel Laureates (New York: Nova Science Publishers). Professor Yew-Kwang Ng.

This book provides a tremendous simplification in the formation of economic policies, in cost-benefit analysis in particular. It advances compelling arguments for the exclusive concern of efficiency ('a dollar is a dollar') in all specific areas of public economic policy, leaving the objective of equality to be achieved through the general tax/transfer system. Interpersonal comparisons of welfares are needed for this latter efficiency/equality trade-off. Public policies should ultimately maximize the sum of individual welfares which should be individual happiness rather than preferences. Economists overestimate the costs of public spending by emphasizing the excess burden of taxation, ignoring the offsetting effects on the spending side, the existence of environmental disruption effects and burden-free taxes on diamond goods. Relative-income effects cause a bias in favour of private consumption which is no longer conducive to social happiness.