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The Slump - The 1930s Depression: Its Origins and Aftermath epub

by Tony Simpson


The Slump - The 1930s Depression: Its Origins and Aftermath epub

ISBN: 0140127518

ISBN13: 978-0140127515

Author: Tony Simpson

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin (1990)

Pages: 181 pages

ePUB book: 1833 kb

FB2 book: 1383 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 489

Other Formats: azw mobi rtf lrf





At the beginning of the 1930s, one-quarter of all wage-earning American workers were unemployed.

At the beginning of the 1930s, one-quarter of all wage-earning American workers were unemployed. In 1932, Americans elected Franklin D. Roosevelt, who, over the next nine years, implemented the New Deal and created a new role for government in American life.

Tony Simpson, The Slump – The 1930s Depression: Its origins and aftermath, Auckland: Penguin Books, 1990, p. 5-96. Housing New Zealand, ‘History of State Housing’; and Schrader, p. 1-42. Schrader, p. 8 and 61.

The Great Depression in the United Kingdom, also known as the Great Slump, was a period of national economic downturn in the 1930s, which had its origins in the global Great Depression. It was Britain's largest and most profound economic depression of the 20th century. The Great Depression originated in the United States in late 1929 and quickly spread to the world. Britain did not experience the boom that had characterized the .

The economic depression that beset the United States and other countries in the 1930s was unique in its magnitude .

The economic depression that beset the United States and other countries in the 1930s was unique in its magnitude and its consequences. At the depth of the depression, in 1933, one American worker in every four was out of a job. In other countries unemployment ranged between 15 percent and 25 percent of the labor force.

This depression was not only an economic catastrophe, it was social and political catastrophes as well. Its origins then and even now are not entirely clear. The document is an attempt to tell the story of the Depression in terms of statistics in the form of graphs and tables. As the above graph indicates the economy descended from full employment in in 1929 where the unemployment rate was . percent into massive unemployment in 1933 when the unemployment rate reached 25 percent

The Great Depression book This part of the book talked about the Dust Bowl and its impacts upon society

The Great Depression book. This is a companion volume to the PBS series on the Great Depression and is quite well done. Even if you have seen the series, the book is still worth reading. It tells the reader in the introductory chapters exactly how the Depression came about, why the stock market tanked so dramatically, and why so many banks failed. This part of the book talked about the Dust Bowl and its impacts upon society.

The 1930s were dominated by the Great Depression in the United States and the rise of Nazi Germany in Europe. The FBI under J. Edgar Hoover went after gangsters, and Franklin D. Roosevelt became synonymous with the decade with his New Deal and "fireside chats. This momentous decade ended with the beginning of World War II in Europe with Nazi Germany's invasion of Poland in September 1939. Central Press, Getty Images. Pluto was discovered as the solar system's ninth planet. It has since been demoted to a dwarf planet.

Its extensive program of economic management and social welfare was heavily influenced . The Slump: The Thirties Depression, Its Origins and Aftermath.

Its extensive program of economic management and social welfare was heavily influenced by the lessons of the Depression.

The traditional Keynesian view traces the magnitude of the Great Depression back to the investment boom of the 1920s

From this it is easy to draw the conclusion that the recession we are entering today is equally the product of the financial crisis. But the US economy was moving into recession before the Wall Street Crash. The traditional Keynesian view traces the magnitude of the Great Depression back to the investment boom of the 1920s.