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The Journal of Dora Damage epub

by Belinda Starling


The Journal of Dora Damage epub

ISBN: 0747585229

ISBN13: 978-0747585220

Author: Belinda Starling

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (November 5, 2007)

Pages: 464 pages

ePUB book: 1973 kb

FB2 book: 1744 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 133

Other Formats: lrf mbr rtf lit





The ending of The Journal of Dora Damage was slightly disjointed; feeling like it was dissected . It is a shame that Belinda Starling passed from this world shortly after finishing this book because it would have been interesting to see what else she could have produced.

The ending of The Journal of Dora Damage was slightly disjointed; feeling like it was dissected from the whole and was part of another book entirely. The writing style appears to change and be altered, while the plot loses some of its magic. At times, it becomes an annoying, standard Victorian romance while at others: just absurd. Sep 27, 2014 Janie Johnson rated it liked it.

The visit from Diprose or Pizzy never came. I wondered if they had been informed but did not care, or whether for a moment we had slipped the scrutiny of the Eeles spies

The visit from Diprose or Pizzy never came. I wondered if they had been informed but did not care, or whether for a moment we had slipped the scrutiny of the Eeles spies. er way. Sylvia (for that is what I was now to call her) spent her first week at Ivy-street living entirely in the past or the future

Dora Damage's married life was never easy, with her epileptic daughter, housekeeping on a budget . The unusual little twists kept the book from losing interest. I would recommend The Journal of Dora Damage to any fiction reader who enjoys a wide range of books and subjects.

Dora Damage's married life was never easy, with her epileptic daughter, housekeeping on a budget and helping out in her husbands Peter's book bindery, but in 1859 it's about to get a lot harder-and a lot more interesting. With Peter unable to work because of rheumatoid arthritis, a massive loan in the hands of one of London's most ruthless moneylenders and no money at home Dora takes the reigns of the business in her own hands and binds a commissioned bible herself.

All the elements are there to make Belinda Starling's posthumously published debut an entertaining addition to the trend for Victorian-era literature. But for me her London never came to life, her feminist message was delivered as subtly as a whip at an orgy and the narrative confused without gripping.

Rude awakening for wife of Victorian bookbinder crippled by arthritis, who turns to binding the specialist pornography of reactionary scientists to keep family and home together. Plenty of authentic London grime and squalor for anyone into period detail, not to mention the esoteric tastes of the aristocracy, but be prepared to be uplifted by a thoroughly modern heroine. Find similar books Profile.

By the time Dora Damage discovers that her husband Peter has arthritis in his hands, it is too late – their book-binding business is in huge debt and the family is on the brink of entering the poorhouse. But Dora proves that she is more than just a housewife and mother. She resolves to rescue her family at any price and finds herself irrevocably entangled in a web of sex, money, deceit and the law. Fiction. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

With his arthritic fingers failing him, he can no longer do the delicate, painstaking work of bookmaking

With his arthritic fingers failing him, he can no longer do the delicate, painstaking work of bookmaking. By the time his wife Dora discovers that there is something wrong with her husband, the Damages are already in danger of entering the poorhouse. Summoning her courage, Dora resolves to rescue herself and her epileptic daughter at any price. She soon learns that her husband isn't the only one with a talent for bookbinding.

New York : Bloomsbury USA : Distributed to the trade by Holtzbrinck Publishers. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on June 16, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

First published 2007. The moral right of the author has been asserted.

Sadly, Belinda Starling passed away in August of 2006 after complications following surgery. She was 34 years old, and The Journal of Dora Damage was her first novel. It is tragic, for Starling was a talented writer with many stories to give. However, those of us daring enough to enter Dora Damage's world are lucky to have such a striking book to hold onto and enjoy. Atmospheric, absorbing Victorian melodrama. Published by Thriftbooks

Book by Starling, Belinda
I have rarely seen or read such a complete package as is in this absolutely wonderful book, "The Journal of Dora Damage." As fits a book about a bookbinder the outside cover design is beautiful and the novel itself is completely written with no missing elements, no boring pages, no plot line un-followed up and no character incomplete. There is no doubt in my mind that this was the best book I've read in the last calendar year.

Dora Damage's married life was never easy, with her epileptic daughter, housekeeping on a budget and helping out in her husbands Peter's book bindery, but in 1859 it's about to get a lot harder-and a lot more interesting. With Peter unable to work because of rheumatoid arthritis, a massive loan in the hands of one of London's most ruthless moneylenders and no money at home Dora takes the reigns of the business in her own hands and binds a commissioned bible herself. When the man who ordered it is delighted with Dora's unique style Damage's bookbinders gains a group of important new clients-who are having a most unusual kind of literature bound.

At first Dora is fascinated, and then repulsed, by the variety of pornography coming through her business. But by the time she realizes the true danger of her new clients she is too late. They own her, not only because they're paying the bills, but because her daughter's epilepsy is considered a mental illness and the threat of a mental hospital and unspeakable treatments hangs over her head.

With a bevy of strange new friends from all walks of life, some very detailed and complete sexual knowledge and wonderfully imaginative book binding skills Dora sets out to escape the trap she has fallen into. But can she get out with her family, her money and her own skin intact?

As I said above this was a wonderful book. It's one of a rare genera of book that seems to have elements from every genera available-romance, mystery, adventure, war, comedy- but doesn't overwhelm the reader with constant changes in direction. The writing style is warm and engaging and with the incredible plot and very human characters the book is overall, impossible to put down.

I was very sad to read the note in the back of the book by Belinda Starling's brother Boris telling of her tragic death a mere seven weeks after finishing the book. I would like to express my condolences to her family-it's true that you can't get a complete sense of a person by reading what they've written, but anyone with the imagination and heart that this book took to write must have been a joy to be around. I hope that this book manages to bring the acclaim to Belinda Starling that she so rightfully deserved.

Five stars.

Though I can't think of anything that makes these two books similar except for the setting of Victorian England and being narrated by strong women, I have a feeling that anyone who liked this book would enjoy "The Tailor's Daughter" by Janice Graham.
Great premise-- I know so little about the trade and importance of bookbinding in the 19th century and it also offers a view into the daily life of the working classes, etc. Is interesting up until about a third of the way in, then it turns into some sort of ridiculous soap opera reminiscent of the Anne Rice Beauty novels. I also mentally checked out when the narrator gushed love all over her husband with absolutely no reason to back it up since her life was misery and he treated her badly [which she acknowledged repeatedly], and he gave no respect to her or assistance with their special needs child. Then other people treated her badly and actually knocked her down and kicked her, and she got up off the floor and asked them if they wanted tea. I was so angry, I would have kicked them in the teeth. Granted, those are my modern sensibilities, but from a plot standpoint it didn't jibe at all with her initial go-getter let's fix this attitude. Can't have it both ways.

The premise was good and mysterious, but then it took a stupid left turn and became a historical romance novel. An effort was made to describe the realism of the grim circumstance she found herself in, but then ended up in the most ridiculous of plot twists involving fetishes and ending up with a tattoo on her ass. Huh? Both existed in the 19th century, but the story became like a cartoon. Her affair with the slave Din had some potential, but that never manifested as anything other than the most generic romance novel fare with the most cursory glossover backstory.

I finished the book just to finish it, but I hated all the characters by the end, except her daughter, who was a generic blond child with no personality to irritate. Not a bad book, but it's meant for an airplane read on a long flight. It piqued my interest about bookbinding and the first third of the book was interesting, but the rest was disappointing. Sad, because this was the author's first-- and last-- book, since she died. She had some great ideas and the writing is decent, I would have looked forward to other books in this vein with less ridiculous plots.
Amazing book! Fans of Sarah Waters will love this one!
I really enjoyed this book. The subject matter was very unusual, so it was different to the usual fiction set in the era. What really made this book was the relationships and the attitudes of the day- to women, to the poor, to wives, to immigrants. I found it compelling reading once I got into it, and didn't want to put it down. The unusual little twists kept the book from losing interest. I would recommend The Journal of Dora Damage to any fiction reader who enjoys a wide range of books and subjects.
This book is truly brilliant - well-researched, funny, racy, tender and very well-written. It was hard to put down this book, with its intimate insights into Dora's rapid progression as her efforts to feed her family with her bookbinding skills gradually open a door to a previously forbidden world of saucy literature.
Fantastic overview of VictorianEngland btw rich and poor. Book binding procedures meticulously recorded, Complex story with interesting twists and turns. Very compelling story.
An intriguing and unusual premise holds so much promise. Blasé writing, bland storytelling, and a lack of editorial cutting killed this book for me. The Journal of Dora Damage seemed like a recipe for success - historical fiction (nearly always a hit for me), a love of books (the story is about a bookbinder and his family), a woman forced to make her way in a man's world for which she was utterly unprepared (after her husband takes ill, she is are forced to take on pornographic book production to stay in business)... In theory it should have been very interesting. In practice, it was monotonous, the "conflict" was boring, the characters were surprisingly unsympathetic. Quite the dud, all in all.