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Bhagavata Purana (A Set of Two Volumes) epub

by Ramesh Menon


Bhagavata Purana (A Set of Two Volumes) epub

ISBN: 8129116618

ISBN13: 978-8129116611

Author: Ramesh Menon

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Rupa & Co. (January 1, 2011)

Pages: 1449 pages

ePUB book: 1694 kb

FB2 book: 1347 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 684

Other Formats: mobi mbr rtf azw





I read it after reading Volumes 1 and 2 of the Mahabharata and I was happy I did so because this book narrated events from Lord Krishna's perspective

I read it after reading Volumes 1 and 2 of the Mahabharata and I was happy I did so because this book narrated events from Lord Krishna's perspective. It filled the gaps from a historical context and made the reading experience more enjoyable. The narrative was equally engaging.

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्रीमद्देवीभागवतमहापुराण The Complete Devi Bhagavata Purana: Two Volumes

्रीमद्देवीभागवतमहापुराण The Complete Devi Bhagavata Purana: Two Volumes. I wanted to take a moment to let you know you have a phenomenal collection of books on Indian Philosophy, Tantra and Yoga and commend you and the entire staff at Exotic India for showcasing the best of what our ancient civilization has to offer to the world. I don't know how Exotic India does it but they are amazing.

Items related to Bhagavata Purana (A Set of Two Volumes). Ramesh Menon was born 1951 in New Delhi

Items related to Bhagavata Purana (A Set of Two Volumes). Home Menon, Ramesh Bhagavata Purana (A Set of Two Volumes). This book is a full literary rendering of the Bhagavata Purana, bringing all the wonder, wisdom and grace of the Book of God to the modern reader. About the Author: Ramesh Menon was born 1951 in New Delhi. Studied in St Xavier's High School and St. Stephen's College. Lived and worked in Delhi, HongKong, Bangalore, Jakarta and now lives in Kodaikanal. He is the author of The Hunt for K, Blue God: A Life of Krishna and Ramayana.

Bhagavata Purana by Ramesh Menon. Books : BHAGAVATA PURANA A SET OF TWO VOLUMES PB. Specifications. See any care plans, options and policies that may be associated with this product. Electrode, App-product, Comp-556358623, ralus-4, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-29.

Answered Sep 29, 2018. The Bhagavata Purana. How can I download a free PDF book of The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein? From where can I download the PDF of the novel The Girl Who Knew Too Much by Vikrant Khanna? Arun Kumar, former Student. Answered Sep 4, 2018.

Download the The Bhagavata Purana as a free PDF ebook. They go back in time to perhaps more than five millennia. In The Bhagavata Purana concepts like Advaita, Yoga, Bhakti and Dharma are introduced. Download the English translation here (111 pages/1. 3 MB): The Bhagavata Purana. The Bhagavata Purana, literally meaning Divine-Eternal Tales of The Supreme Lord, is considered the most important of the Puranas. Published by: N. Krishhaswamy. Date Published: 02/01/2014.

The Bhagavata Purana is a living embodiment of the Lord Narayana and claims to bestow moksha merely by being . Ramesh Menon was born 1951 in New Delhi. Studied in St Xaviers High School and St. Stephens College

The Bhagavata Purana is a living embodiment of the Lord Narayana and claims to bestow moksha merely by being heard. Just before Krishna, the Avatara, leaves the world, Uddhava says to him, leave us a tangible form, Lord, in which we can find you, touch you, and be near you. Krishna enters the Bhagavata Purana with all of his being. Stephens College.

Bhagavata Purana (2 volumes). Srimad Bhagavad-Gita. Ramesh Menon (born 20 September 1951) is an Indian author of several literary renderings in modern English prose of classical works from the ancient Hindu tradition. The Complete Mahabharata (12 volumes). His books include The Ramayana: A Modern Retelling of the Great Indian Epic (Farrar, Straus & Giroux and HarperCollins India); The Mahabharata: A Modern Rendering (2 volumes), Krishna: Life and Song of the Blue God, Siva: The Siva Purana Retold, Devi: The Devi Bhagavatam Retold, the Bhagavata Purana (2 volumes), a new translation of the.

Find nearly any book by Ramesh Menon. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Bhagavata Purana (Clothbound).

Even after he has composed the awesome Mahabharata, the Maharishi Vyasa finds no peace. Narada Muni says to him, Ordinary men will be delighted by your work, but what about the Sages of heaven and earth? You have described the human life, its strife and its ends, but you have not yet described the Lord himself. You must turn your great gift to that task; only then will you find peace. Veda Vyasa composes the Bhagavata Purana, in eighteen thousand slokas and twelve kandas. He teaches it to his illumined son Suka, who narrates the Secret Purana to Yudhishtira s heir, King Parikshit, on the banks of the Ganga. The Bhagavata Purana is a living embodiment of the Lord Narayana and claims to bestow moksha merely by being heard. Just before Krishna, the Avatara, leaves the world, Uddhava says to him, leave us a tangible form, Lord, in which we can find you, touch you, and be near you. Krishna enters the Bhagavata Purana with all of his being. This book is a full literary rendering of the Bhagavata Purana, bringing all the wonder, wisdom and grace of the Book of God to the modern reader.
I was active in ISKCON (the International Society for Krishna Consciousness) from 1977-79. I haven’t practiced the religion since I left, but I still find myself to be interested in its philosophy and scriptures, for what that’s worth.

I first encountered ISKCON writings in my college library, starting with Krishna, The Supreme Personality of Godhead and continuing with the Bhagavad Gita and other books. Their most impressive book, at least in size, was Srila Prabhupada’s translation of Srimad Bhagavatam. It took up several shelves and each volume contained both translated verses and elaborate (and to my young mind, repetitive) commentary. I found myself reading the verses and skipping most of the commentary, and found myself wishing for a translation that lacked that commentary and included the R rated details that I felt certain Srila Prabhupada was leaving out.

If Ramesh Menon’s translation of the Srimad Bhagavatam (AKA Bhagavata Purana) had been available back then it would have seemed to be exactly what I was looking for. I would have read it and probably never would have visited the Evanston Hare Krishna temple or done any of the foolish things described in my own memoir of those days. It may seem strange to say it, since those days did not end happily for me, but that would have been a shame.

The problem with this book is that it is not a simple, literal translation, but it is marketed as such. It bears the same relationship to the actual Bhagavata Purana as a Cecil B DeMille movie does to the Bible. DeMille’s movies are a sexed up version of their source material, and the more intelligent members of the movie going public understand that. If a sincere spiritual seeker took them as anything else, there are plenty of Bibles around where he can read the original story.

Menon’s book, on the other hand, pretends to be a literal translation, to the point where important passages are shown as untranslated Sanskrit before the translation. If he had just done that, I wouldn’t complain. The problem is, he adds stories he made up himself to the text, embellishes passages having anything to do with sex, and adds sex where it doesn’t exist in the original. He also does what I must conclude are mistranslations. For example, he refers to the BP as “the secret Purana”. Srila Prabhupada told us it was “the spotless Purana”, in other words without flaw. That translation makes a great deal more sense than Menon’s.

Another thing Menon does is refer to the cowherds Krishna grew up with as Gypsies. This is not accurate, even based on Menon's own translation. Krishna’s father Nanda is described as constantly giving away thousands of cows to the Brahmans, and not just cows but decorated cows, with horns plated with gold or silver. He must have had more money than Joel Osteen. He was no gypsy.

Where Menon adds sexual incidents is of course in the stories of the love of the gopis. In the original text (from Prabhupada’s translations and others) there is no mention of Krishna and the gopis actually having sexual intercourse. The BP is not shy about people having sex. There are many incidents in the BP as well as in the Mahabharata where something happens specifically because someone was having sex, and the text tells you as much. It isn’t described in any detail, but you are told without doubt that it happened. For example, in an early section of the book two great demons are born because a woman couldn’t wait a half hour to have sex.

My point is, Krishna’s loving exploits with the gopis are not described as including actual shagging. You’d never know that from reading Menon’s “translation”.

While I was not impressed with Srila Prabhupada’s extensive commentary back in 1977, I have since come around. The commentary is important and necessary. Someone might disagree with it, but at least it represents an actual tradition in Hinduism and isn’t something made up by the translater.

The BP expounds a philosophy with all of its stories, and Menon’s translation is so vague in places that you don’t get a clear idea of what that philosophy is. You can’t determine whether the BP says that the ultimate truth is personal or impersonal, or whether Krishna is the original form of God or merely an avatar of Vishnu.

I will not judge whether the philosophy of the BP is true or not. Having said that, books in general and scriptures especially deserve to be translated without distorting the intent of the original author, and this book in my opinion does not do that.
VERY thin translation of the original source document. If you are interested in a more in depth understand of the Bhagavat Purana, you might want to find a more intensive translation. This translation hits the "very" high points and leaves out a lot of detail that might be helpful for a more in depth understanding.
Came very well packaged! I was surprised because I anticipated some damages. It is definitely very dense to read but the language is easy to follow and those familiar with Hindu Mythology will enjoy the attention to detail. Totally worth it for the price!! I'm a college student and I have found it enjoyable to read slowly.
Spiritually transformative. I read it after reading Volumes 1 and 2 of the Mahabharata and I was happy I did so because this book narrated events from Lord Krishna's perspective. It filled the gaps from a historical context and made the reading experience more enjoyable. The narrative was equally engaging. The Eternal Truth and the ultimate reality are always relevant and a constant reminder that we are still living in the Matrix. The Bhagavata Purana provides the means to escape it!
This epic is beautifully written (translated) with heart stopping scenes of tenderness or heroic (entirely bloody) battles of good and evil . . . as it is costly, I've downloaded the kindle version and I am very happy with it. So portable, you know. What to say . . . this translation also has a good many sanskrit terms (transliterated of course) that are sometimes defined (I finally learned that a "crore" is ten million) and sometimes not, and have to be understood by context or maybe looked up. I am in my first read and am not looking them up. As I go, I find they become clear or don't matter but I am planning to go back again and look some of them up. There's a term punya that I think has to be something like good karma or spiritual credit though it's not a word I've heard or seen before.

I am very happy to have found this work, mostly inspired to look for it reading the Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna which, in the translation by Nikhilinanda does not have all these mysterious sanskrit words to sleuth out.

O yes, silly me, I didn't know that Krishna wasn't celibate with the gopis!!!! And yet, the manner in which their love is celebrated is just exquisite . . . suffice it to say that nobody feels left out.

This is a great magnificent wonderful story but also loaded with the kind of instruction and inspiration that is intended to deliver liberation just by the reading. This it claims it will do, to lift the lover of the divine, the reader of the tale, into the ultimate reunion, the oneness space, the communion with bliss and forever. Great great stuff. Later on I'll own a non digital copy. Probably.
To describe this book is futile, because to attempt to describe it is to attempt to describe the Lord Himself. The only way to know is to become it, and the way to become it is by reading it over and over. Recently, I've started reciting it aloud, and the effect of that is beyond words. I highly recommend this to any bhaktas of the Lord Vishnu/Krishna. Thanks Ramesh. I hope to meet you someday.
The translation of the bhagavata puranam is ver nice and easy to read. Since I don t know sanskrit, I always felt that I would never be able to truly enjoy the wealth of Hindu religion - its knowledge recorded in the vedas, puranas and upanishads but the author has made a fine translation whcih is worth every penny. I am also buying a hard copy as I feel that this is a treasure - the puranam itself is great and beyond my review - therefore focussing on the translation, though I cannot verify its authencity, it is ideal for someone who wants to read and understand the Bhagavatham..
The initial cost made me hesitate, but after almost completing the first volume, the value far exceeds the cost! For those who have studied The Gita, or The Ramayana, these legends of the Divine are food for the soul.