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Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World epub

by Alfred Birnbaum


Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World epub

ISBN: 4770018932

ISBN13: 978-4770018939

Author: Alfred Birnbaum

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: True Crime

Language: English

Publisher: Kodansha International Ltd; Water Damaged edition (January 1, 1994)

Pages: 416 pages

ePUB book: 1829 kb

FB2 book: 1170 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 102

Other Formats: docx lrf doc azw





know how powerfully and At The End Of The World" interacted and affected my moment. I have read of Murakami's books 1Q84, Wind Up Bird Chronicles, Kafka at the Shore and now End of the World

I would like to thank Haruki Murakami for all his books, but would especially like for him to know how powerfully and At The End Of The World" interacted and affected my moment. Thank You. Bill Schaefer ww. ena. org ww. uicksilvertimes. I have read of Murakami's books 1Q84, Wind Up Bird Chronicles, Kafka at the Shore and now End of the World. I had begun to suspect Murakami is a genius after the first, but thought, "too much fun and wonderful to be great literature". The others convinced me that this is an author who listens to no voice other than his own, and is creating a body of works our children will read in college.

Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World (世界の終りとハードボイルド・ワンダーランド, Sekai no owari to hādo-boirudo wandārando) is a 1985 novel by Japanese writer Haruki Murakami

Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World (世界の終りとハードボイルド・ワンダーランド, Sekai no owari to hādo-boirudo wandārando) is a 1985 novel by Japanese writer Haruki Murakami. The English translation by Alfred Birnbaum was released in 1991. A strange and dreamlike novel, its chapters alternate between two bizarre led Wonderland" (a cyberpunk-like, science fiction part) and "The End of the World" (a virtual fantasy-like, surreal part).

Another issue with the Hard-Boiled Wonderland portion of the book, are the random references to Western culture . 1985 novel by Japanese writer Haruki Murakami.

Another issue with the Hard-Boiled Wonderland portion of the book, are the random references to Western culture sprinkled throughout the book.

Hard-boiled wonderland. Translated and adapted by Alfred Birnbaum. with the participation of the author. The translator wishes to acknowledge the assistance. and the End of the World. Fantastical, mysterious, and funn. fantasy world that might have been penned by Franz Kafka. Philadelphia Inquirer.

Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World draws readers into a narrative particle accelerator in which a split-brained data processor, a deranged scientist, his shockingly undemure granddaughter, Lauren Bacall, Bob Dylan, and various thugs, librarians, and subterranean.

Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World draws readers into a narrative particle accelerator in which a split-brained data processor, a deranged scientist, his shockingly undemure granddaughter, Lauren Bacall, Bob Dylan, and various thugs, librarians, and subterranean monsters collide to dazzling effect. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

by Haruki Murakami · Alfred Birnbaum. I tried to make sense of the Four Books, until love arrived, and it all became a single syllable. Monkey Brain Sushi: New Tastes in Japanese Fiction. by Alfred Birnbaum · Masahiko Shimada · Mariko Ōhara · Masato Takeno · Amy Yamada · Gen'ichiro Takahashi · Haruki Murakami · Eri Makino · Kyōji Kobayashi · Michio Hisauchi · Osamu Hashimoto · Yoshinori Shimizu. Cyberpunk, sci-fi and erotica all meld together in this collection of cutting-edge short stories.

Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami has it all; a fiction work with elements of surrealism and science fiction as well as nods to. .Translator: Alfred Birnbaum

Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami has it all; a fiction work with elements of surrealism and science fiction as well as nods to hard-boiled detective fiction (although I would not put the novel in the hard-boiled categotry). It is the most imaginative of Murakami's works in my opinion. Translator: Alfred Birnbaum.

Hyperkinetic and relentlessly inventive, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World is Haruki Murakami’s deep dive into the very nature of consciousness

Hyperkinetic and relentlessly inventive, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World is Haruki Murakami’s deep dive into the very nature of consciousness. Across two parallel narratives, Murakami draws readers into a mind-bending universe in which Lauren Bacall, Bob Dylan, a split-brained data processor, a deranged scientist, his shockingly undemure granddaughter, and various thugs, librarians, and subterranean monsters collide to dazzling effect.

Wow. I don't know if it is the timing of my life that impacts the way I read this book, but it really spoke deeply to me. I loved the parallel stories and how they intersected. I really enjoyed the s.spense, and surprisingly, the sci-fi elements. Either way, this will stay with me for a long time. Definitely warrants a second read. As do most of Murakami’s works. It deals with human consciousness and duality of personality

"Kafka on the Shore" was my introduction to Haruki Murakami. It was wonderful and I was forever connected. It was years ago now. Loved so many of his books over the years. And now It's time to give thanks for "Hard-Boiled-Wonderland At The End Of The World."
I'm 76. I've worked for almost forty years with dying folks and those experiencing catastrophic loss. These last few years my fairly constant companion, death, has come intimately into my own life. Dear ones, close, have died. And I too have little deaths often, as my body, and worse, my mind loses this, that, and sometimes the other thing.
So I began the book examining my own grief and mulling through the past, balancing, opening, letting go.
As I read, each chapter seemed to keep pace with my moment, sometimes leading, sometimes following. I spend so much of my time speaking to balance and rhythm as it relates to lifecycles. And here I was in a gentle dance with the words, the specifics of story and memory, and a sense, somehow, of healing.
As with all of his books, I hated for the words to end. But this time, I felt not a sense of loss as I read the last line, but a feeling of peace.
I would like to thank Haruki Murakami for all his books, but would especially like for him to know how powerfully "Hard-Boiled-Wonderland At The End Of The World" interacted and affected my moment.
Thank You.
Bill Schaefer
www.sena.org
www.quicksilvertimes.blogspot.com
I have read of Murakami's books 1Q84, Wind Up Bird Chronicles, Kafka at the Shore and now End of the World. I had begun to suspect Murakami is a genius after the first, but thought, "too much fun and wonderful to be great literature". The others convinced me that this is an author who listens to no voice other than his own, and is creating a body of works our children will read in college.

This book is truly out there -- our hero wanders into a scene that is as absurd and silly as a comic book, and some of the wacky science is a little too much. But it's all just the vehicle for expressing a truly thoughtful and unexpected view of ones consciousness, and what has meaning, or even perhaps what -is- meaning. It has been a while since I read Sartre, Kafka, Camus and others but it recall thinking each had a surreal vision of daily reality -- characters were just foils for their ideas. This is similar in some ways.

Murakami, so far has impressed me with his ability to bring wit, humor, immediacy and his own personality and loves into his writing. This makes it approachable, fun, and a little less self-important than these other great authors. This book is not one I would recommend if you're interested in starting with Murakami -- Kafka at the Shore or 1Q84 both fit that bill well. But if you are a fan, and properly prepared for the bizarre, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World is a stunning and beautiful work of literature.
This is a first rate science fiction novel. Surprisingly, Murakami provides a better hard science backdrop to his story than the recently much touted “Interstellar.” What’s more, its theme was highly original. But the science was so deep it got a little confusing. So to help out (maybe) I’ll give you my take.

The human mind is what we call a state machine. It’s composed of switches that can be on or off. The “state” referred to is the on-off condition of the whole switching “ensemble” at a given time. The machine moves from state to state (through the available “state space”) as time progresses. The human mind is a near-infinite state space machine. That is, there are enormous numbers of switching configurations it can demonstrate.

The basic premise is that you can use the instantaneous state of the brain to create an encryption code to secure data. As the brain state is far larger than any existing public encryption key, you can create an unbreakable code key. The problem is that the brain state keeps changing. So you have to store the state at the instant of encryption. To do that, you must create a separate mind that you can rope off, preserve and go back to when you want to decrypt your data. Somehow, the kindly old scientist called “grandfather” found out how to do this with a real brain. This, of course, was of enormous interest to governments and to other nefarious agencies.

The problem was that all but one of the subjects “grandfather” treated died. The one survivor remained by creating a third brain state that was, in fact, another world to which its creator could escape. This “world” would last forever and its inhabitants would be immortal. Longevity was not in their existing for all time in the physical universe. But rather, the nearly infinite capacity of the human brain could segment each instant in to smaller and smaller “sub-instants” effectively making a finite interval of time last forever. It’s “kind of like Zeno’s paradox” grandfather observes.

This, by itself is interesting, but Murakami, as far as I know, is not a scientist. He is, like grandfather, largely self-taught in the field. And he has no real interest in the science he spins. His real interest is to explore the making and mechanism of the human mind. He engages in this exploration to achieve an understanding of what a “character” is in literature – how a character can represent a mind, a mental state. Given this, it is really amazing how coherent the technical issues of the book come out.

So, was the book worth the read? If you’re expecting a novel like The Wind-up Bird Chronicles” or “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki,” forget it. This is not it. This is an exploration of mind and literature. It’s also, like I said, a science fiction book. The writing, of course, is spectacular and mood evoking. But the characters themselves lack the engaging quality and real-world anchors of some of Murakami’s previously drawn figures. But part of Murakami’s great talent is that he can work in many genres and weave some really weird “stuff” into his stories while still maintaining credibility as an author. I think this is an important book, as it exposes what one of the great novelists of our time thinks about his art. But it’s certainly unlike the main body of his literary work.
Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World (Kindle Edition) by Haruki Murakami

I suppose it all just depends on your view, doesn't it? Which is what this book all about. Our hero is really an amazing person. He is imbued with a gift, and then that gift is made into a weapon (of sorts). but how much of his humanity did he sacrifice along the way?
First published in 1985, it holds up quite well now. The horrific journeys taken seem like suicide. Or do they? Lots of humor, and lots of Western references too! This is nt just a very serious look into the consciousness of our hero, but also an examination of choices made, and to be made.