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Is Killing Wrong?: A Study in Pure Sociology (Studies in Pure Sociology) epub

by Donald Black,Mark Cooney


Is Killing Wrong?: A Study in Pure Sociology (Studies in Pure Sociology) epub

ISBN: 0813928265

ISBN13: 978-0813928265

Author: Donald Black,Mark Cooney

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: True Crime

Language: English

Publisher: University of Virginia Press (October 7, 2009)

Pages: 272 pages

ePUB book: 1111 kb

FB2 book: 1526 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 897

Other Formats: docx mbr doc txt





Mark Cooney's Is Killing Wrong? is a masterful application of pure sociology to the social response to homicide.

Mark Cooney's Is Killing Wrong? is a masterful application of pure sociology to the social response to homicide. Drawing on voluminous historical, cross-cultural, and current social science evidence, Cooney shows that the response to homicide, ranging from praise to the death penalty, is tied to the social statuses and relationships of victims, perpetrators, and third parties.

Studies in pure sociology

Studies in pure sociology. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index. Formatted Contents Note: The morality of homicide Pure sociology The vertical dimension The corporate dimension The radial dimension The normative dimension The cultural dimension The relational dimension. Rubrics: Murder Homicide Criminal psychology Criminal justice, Administration of. Download now Is killing wrong : a study in pure sociology Mark Cooney. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Mark Cooney's Is Killing Wrong? is a masterful application of pure sociology to the social response to. .Mark Cooney is Professor of Sociology at the University of Georgia and Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Georgia Law School.

The study examines race-specific rates of robbery and homicide by juveniles and adults in over 150 . results show that the scarcity of employed black men increases the prevalence of families headed by females in black communities. In turn, black family disruption substantially increases the rates of black murder and robbery, especially by juveniles.

Is Killing Wrong? book. Conceived by the sociologist Donald Black, pure sociology makes no reference to psychology, to any single person's intent, or even to individuals as such. Instead, pure sociology explains behavior in terms of its social geometry-its location and direction in a multidimensional social space. Is Killing Wrong? provides the most comprehensive assessment of pure sociology yet attempted.

Like rational choice theory, conflict theory, or functionalism, pure sociology is a sociological paradigm - a strategy for explaining human behavior

Like rational choice theory, conflict theory, or functionalism, pure sociology is a sociological paradigm - a strategy for explaining human behavior. Developed by Donald Black as an alternative to individualistic and theories, pure sociology was initially used to explain variation in legal behavior. Since then, Black and other pure sociologists have used the strategy to explain terrorism, genocide, lynching, and other forms of conflict management as well as science, art, and religion.

A Study in Pure Sociology" (Mark Cooney) для скачивания! "Thou shalt not kill" is arguably the most basic moral and legal principle . A Study in Pure Sociology by Mark Cooney. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Mark Cooney

A Study in Pure Sociology" (Mark Cooney) для скачивания! "Thou shalt not kill" is arguably the most basic moral and legal principle i. Author: Mark Cooney. Title: Is Killing Wrong?: A Study in Pure Sociology.

Mark Cooney, Donald Black. Thou shalt not kill" is arguably the most basic moral and legal principle in any society. Yet while some killers are pilloried and punished, others are absolved and acquitted, and still others are lauded and lionized. Why? The traditional answer is that how killers are treated depends on the nature of their killing, whether it was aggressive or defensive, intentional or accidental. But those factors cannot explain the enormous variation in legal officials' and citizens' responses to real-life homicides

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"Thou shalt not kill" is arguably the most basic moral and legal principle in any society. Yet while some killers are pilloried and punished, others are absolved and acquitted, and still others are lauded and lionized. Why? The traditional answer is that how killers are treated depends on the nature of their killing, whether it was aggressive or defensive, intentional or accidental. But those factors cannot explain the enormous variation in legal officials' and citizens' responses to real-life homicides. Cooney argues that a radically new style of thought―pure sociology―can. Conceived by the sociologist Donald Black, pure sociology makes no reference to psychology, to any single person's intent, or even to individuals as such. Instead, pure sociology explains behavior in terms of its social geometry―its location and direction in a multidimensional social space.

Is Killing Wrong? provides the most comprehensive assessment of pure sociology yet attempted. Drawing on data from well over one hundred societies, including the modern-day United States, it represents the most thorough account yet of case-level social control, or the response to conduct defined as wrong. In doing so, it demonstrates that the law and morality of homicide are neither universal nor relative but geometrical, as predicted by Black's theory.

I loved it. This book elaborates on different societies I knew nothing about. Highly recommended!
Despite the title, this isn't a work of moral philosophy. Instead, it's about when killings will get punished, and why some get punished more severely than others. We might take it for granted that killing is wrong, but historically and cross-culturally, that's not always the case. Like the old saying goes, you kill a man in peace and you're a criminal, you do it in war and you're a hero. But even in peacetime some killers get praised, some get tried but aquitted even though they're almost certainly guilty, and of those convicted, some get light sentences while others get life in prison or execution. So what explains all this? Drawing from Donald Black's theories of law and conflict and his own cross-cultural work on homicide, Cooney amasses a variety of findings to illustrate how the social "wrongness" of homicide varies with the social status of killer and victim, with their degree of social closeness to one another, and with their distance from crucial third parties.
Is Killing Wrong? addresses a timeless moral question. But Cooney does not address the morality of killing from a religious or philosophical perspective. Instead, he provides the most extensive review of legal and social responses to homicide ever written and the most comprehensive test of Donald Black's innovative and powerful social science paradigm called "pure sociology." Cooney finds that the "wrongness" of killing - defined by how people (including states and communities) respond to the intentional taking of human life -- is not universal. As Black's theory predicts, it depends on who kills who and the presence and social characteristics of third parties. The book is a pleasure to read, accessible to specialists, students, and general readers.
Mark Cooney knows how to write a good book. The writing is elegant. The stories -- of murder and its handling by governments and community members - are gripping. Most importantly, the theory that ties the stories together is powerful. I recommend this book for anyone interested in sociology, anthropology, criminology, violence, or control.
This is an important question answered through sociological, as opposed to jurisprudential, perspectives. Cooney examines the act of killing and its responses through various sociological dimensions, including, the organizational dimension, the normative dimension, and the cultural dimension. In discussing homicides thus, Cooney explores issues such as police-citizen homicides, respectable victims, trial tactics by lawyers, etc.

Although Cooney provides some notes on each chapter, there are many statements that might be better understood if notes or sources are given. For instance, he writes that: ‘Communal self-help – lynching- is also more likely to follow the killing of a respectable person’. He then gives the example of a nineteenth-century mining town in the American West, ‘where conflict was common’. It may appear without more, that lynching then and there exceeds the racial lynching later in American history.

The more interesting, but perhaps the more controversial part of the book, concerns Cooney’s discussion and conclusion about Donald Black’s 1976 book, ‘The Behaviour of Law’.