» » Laughing Allegra: The Inspiring Story of a Mother's Struggle and Triumph Raising a Daughter With Learning Disabilities

Laughing Allegra: The Inspiring Story of a Mother's Struggle and Triumph Raising a Daughter With Learning Disabilities epub

by Anne Ford


Laughing Allegra: The Inspiring Story of a Mother's Struggle and Triumph Raising a Daughter With Learning Disabilities epub

ISBN: 155704564X

ISBN13: 978-1557045645

Author: Anne Ford

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Specific Groups

Language: English

Publisher: William Morrow; 1 edition (March 26, 2003)

Pages: 272 pages

ePUB book: 1774 kb

FB2 book: 1149 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 251

Other Formats: mbr rtf docx lrf





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Anne Ford did note this in her book.

Read Laughing Allegra by Anne Ford, John-Richard .

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In time, Anne Ford saw her daughter grow into a vibrant, loving, and independent adult with a passion for ice skating and a commitment to help other disabled children. Allegra Ford, now 32, lives independently and supported this book’s publication so it could help other kids.

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Anne Ford's previous books are the acclaimed memoir Laughing Allegra, about raising her severely learning-disabled . She served as Chairman of the Board of the National Center for Learning Disabilities from 1989 to 2001.

Anne Ford's previous books are the acclaimed memoir Laughing Allegra, about raising her severely learning-disabled daughter, and On Their Own: Creating an Independent Future for Your Adult Child with Learning Disabilities and ADHD. The daughter of Henry Ford II, she lives in New York City and lectures widely on LD and ADHD issues. John Richard-Thompson, an award-winning playwright and novelist, collaborates with Anne Ford on her books.

When Anne Ford, great-granddaughter of Henry Ford, learned that her four-year-old daughter Allegra’s differences were the result of severe learning disabilities, she faced a challenge that neither money nor position could ease. Desperate for answers, Anne sought out doctors, teachers, counselors, and others who could help her build a support network for herself and her daughter, while fighting the many common misconceptions and myths about learning disabilities.

In Anne Ford's case the "perfect world" dream dissolved when she learned that her daughter Allegra had learning . Few books have moved me as much as LAUGHING ALLEGRA. While the story of our family is different from Anne's, I do know what happens when the picture gets blurred.

In Anne Ford's case the "perfect world" dream dissolved when she learned that her daughter Allegra had learning disabilities. While they were not visible to the naked eye, what was going on inside Allegra was impeding her development and her ability to learn. It's never easy to accept a dark, definitive verdict, especially when it concerns a small child. What works about this book is that Anne writes this memoir with candor and feeling -- right from the heart.

When Anne Ford, the great-granddaughter of Henry Ford, learned that her daughter Allegra's ''differences'' were the result of severe learning disabilities (LD), she faced a challenge that neither money nor position could.

When Anne Ford, the great-granddaughter of Henry Ford, learned that her daughter Allegra's ''differences'' were the result of severe learning disabilities (LD), she faced a challenge that neither money nor position could ease. When Anne Ford, the great-granddaughter of Henry Ford, learned that her daughter Allegra's ''differences'' were the result of severe learning disabilities (LD), she faced a challenge that neither money nor position could ease. Desperate for answers, she sought out doctors, schools, and tutors for help.

When Anne Ford, great-granddaughter of Henry Ford, learned that her four-year-old daughter Allegra s differences were the result of severe learning disabilities, she faced a challenge that neither money nor position could ease

When Anne Ford, great-granddaughter of Henry Ford, learned that her four-year-old daughter Allegra s differences were the result of severe learning disabilities, she faced a challenge that neither money nor position could ease.

When Anne Ford, great-granddaughter of Henry Ford, learned that her four-year-old daughter Allegra’s “differences” were the result of severe learning disabilities, she faced a challenge that neither money nor position could ease. Desperate for answers, Anne sought out doctors, teachers, counselors, and others who could help her build a support network for herself and her daughter, while fighting the many common misconceptions and myths about learning disabilities.

Now, in this fiercely honest and compelling memoir, Anne tells her story, writing movingly of her feelings as the mother of a learning disabled child. “I grew to accept that life is filled with uncertainty and that answers to the most simple, yet profound, questions such as ‘What is wrong with my daughter?’ can be elusive. I learned to be self-reliant in ways I never had before. I learned that every spark of optimism and hope was something to be nurtured and treasured because sometimes they were the only comfort available. And I learned that worry had entered my life.”

In time, Anne Ford saw her daughter grow into a vibrant, loving, and independent adult with a passion for ice skating and a commitment to help other disabled children. Allegra Ford, now 32, lives independently and supported this book’s publication so “it could help other kids.” Anne’s experience led her to become a tireless activist on behalf of children and families faced with LD, including her service as Chairman of the Board of the National Center for Learning Disabilities from 1989 to 2001, and the writing of this book with John-Richard Thompson, an award-winning playwright and novelist.

In addition to Anne’s personal story, Laughing Allegra includes four invaluable special sections:

Answers to the most commonly asked questions about LD A resource guide on where to find help A discussion from a mother’s perspective on the challenges of homework, money, relationships, the work- place, and planning as the LD child and parents age A section on “Siblings and Secrets,” new in this paperback edition, inspired by Anne’s conversations with readers during her hardcover book tour.
I have to say, I sobbed while reading parts of this book. My own daughter struggles with learning disabilities, and a low IQ. I have felt alone in this battle for so long, and this book showed how wrong I have been. She tells it like it is, and although everything is not exactly the same, I really felt like she 'got it'. After having bought so many informational guides, I really loved reading a real story of the struggles of everyday life.

I also will always appreciate the speech by her son, where he describes how left out and alone he felt because his mother was preoccupied with her daughter. That alone spoke volumes, and I made a date with my other kids right away. I discussed why my time is consumed with their sister, and told them that I do know I need to make more one on one time for them. It is one blessing I will not soon forget.

If you have a learning disabled child, just get this book. Great resources in it too (maybe some of these kids can go to college after all!!!)
I greatly enjoyed this book because it showed the struggle of a Mom to find the right school, resources and work for her daughter...despite having all the resources available to her. For those with children with severe learning disabilities, it will help you see that a full rewarding life is very possible. For those with children with moderate learning disabilities, it will make you feel blessed for dealing with so few problems!
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. As the mother of a daughter with learning disabilities, it was amazing to read about how similar she is to Allegra. It helps to be able to validate your thoughts, feelings and concerns by reading about the experience of another mother. Anne Ford is able to clearly and accurately articulate what it's like to raise a child with learning disabilities which is something not all of us can really define. I would also recommend her book "On Their Own". I refer to it again and again especially when trying to explain to someone what it means to be learning disabled.
I have read many books out there, and this is the best one that I have found. This book is much better than Dana Buchman's book called "A Special Education" in which she constantly refers to her daughter's mild mental retardation as a "learning difference". In this book, the author is honest and tells it like it is.... she does not sugar coat it like Buchman's book. In Buckman's book, she talked too much about herself instead of her daughter. The only negative part of Anne Ford's book is that she constantly talked about the private schools refusing to let her child attend, but if she had picked a public school, it is the law that they would have to allow her child to attend. Most regular private schools would not have the resources that her child would require. For instance, speech therapist, occupation therapist, physical therapist are not necessarily found in private schools, but public schools would have these resources because they are required by law to teach all children. Anne Ford did note this in her book. Finally, here are some quotes from Anne Ford's book that might be helpful...

"a learning disability affects a person's ability to interpret what they see and hear or their ability to link information from different parts of the brain, because their brain is 'wired' a little differently. These differences can show up as specific difficulties with spoken and written language, with coordination, self-control, or with paying attention. People can have learning disabilities in reading, writing, math, and processing information."

"Most children with LD can read words, but comprehension may be another matter entirely."

"Children with LD can and do succeed in school."

"Adults with LD can and do succeed in the workplace."

"LD can be treated successfully, and children with LD can go on to live happy, normal lives."

In conclusion, I highly recommend this book to all parents who have special needs children, and the teachers who teaches them.
Biographical and interesting, especially if you have a special needs child you love. Also resources listed for help.
The honesty of Anne's writing hooked me from the start. It was an introduction to a world many of us still know or understand very little about unless we've dealt with it first hand. I highly recommend this book to teachers because it gives you a sense of where, not only a student with a learning disability is coming from, but also their parents and siblings as well.
I recommend it to anyone I couldn't put it down read it in a day an a half great author
Very informative and quite a story.