» » The Private Diary of an O.J. Juror: Behind the Scenes of the Trial of the Century

The Private Diary of an O.J. Juror: Behind the Scenes of the Trial of the Century epub

by Michael Knox


The Private Diary of an O.J. Juror: Behind the Scenes of the Trial of the Century epub

ISBN: 0787105805

ISBN13: 978-0787105808

Author: Michael Knox

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Regional U.S.

Language: English

Publisher: Dove Mass Markets; First Printing edition (June 1, 1995)

Pages: 300 pages

ePUB book: 1701 kb

FB2 book: 1277 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 512

Other Formats: mobi doc rtf txt





Michael Knox was Juror 620, and was removed from the jury on March 1, 1995 after two months of sequestration, for not having revealed on his juror questionnaire that he had once been charged with kidnapping.

Michael Knox was Juror 620, and was removed from the jury on March 1, 1995 after two months of sequestration, for not having revealed on his juror questionnaire that he had once been charged with kidnapping. He recalls sitting at home and watching TV after being removed from the jury, and watching another former juror being interviewed: ‘she’s telling the world that there’s racial tension on the jury. And she’s calling the white deputies racists. What she’s trying to say is that .

The Private Diary of an . 0787105805 (ISBN13: 9780787105808). What came through was the picture of how fraught the sequestration was, how petty were the behind-the-scenes interaction between jurors, and how often individuals jumped to conclusions about others, how racist or non-racist someone else was, based on, sometimes, how one person looked at another, for example. I found this book a fairly gossipy read. There was no insight into Mr Knox's decision-making, no discussion about how any of the evidence affected his belief in the guilt or innocence of OJ.

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Michael Knox is the author of Private Diary of an . Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Michael Knox's books. Michael Knox’s Followers (1). Michael Knox.

By: Mike Walker, Michael Knox. Narrated by: Michael Knox.

A former juror answers questions about the . Format Audio cassette. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

One book, "The Private Diary of an . Juror," by Mike Walker and Michael Knox, published by Dove Books, sold 500,000 copies. They have been more scrutinized - and more pampered - than perhaps any other jury. They got a tour in a Goodyear blimp, a private audience with the comedian Jay Leno, a trip to Universal studios. she reported to Ito that former jurors had passed a note, getting both of them dismissed from the panel. White Woman, 60 She is divorced, a retired clerk for the Southern California Gas Company.

Dismissed juror Michael Knox wrote The Private Diary of an .

The article notes that even the slightest whiff of misconduct had a juror removed. Dismissed juror Michael Knox wrote The Private Diary of an .

A former juror answers questions about the O.J. Simpson trial and its jury
This was a great expose from another juror's prespective. The book was received in great condition.
Michael Knox was “Juror 620,” and was removed from the jury on March 1, 1995 after two months of sequestration, for not having revealed on his juror questionnaire that he had once been charged with kidnapping.

He recalls sitting at home and watching TV after being removed from the jury, and watching another former juror [Jeanette Harris] being interviewed: “‘she’s telling the world that there’s racial tension on the jury. And she’s calling the white deputies racists. What she’s trying to say is that O.J. won’t get a fair trial because the race thing is putting pressure on everybody…’ Then [the juror] dropped her next bombshell. She implied that despite Judge Ito’s orders, jurors were discussing the case…” (Pg. 14-15) But later, he stated, “Here’s a bombshell revelation … Jeanette Harris flat-out LIED when she said the jury discussed the trial! I never heard any juror---Jeanette included---say one word about testimony or about O.J. himself. Judge Ito had warned over and over that we must NEVER discuss the trial. No one ever broke that rule, to my knowledge.” (Pg. 184-185)

He argues, “There’s no doubt---none!---that had Darryl Gates still been police chief of Los Angeles, O.J. Simpson’s life would have ended in a hail of police bullets. It’s only because the riot-torn city had finally hired a black man, Police Chief Willie Williams, that O.J. is alive today.” (Pg. 45)

He points out, “The racial segregation at mealtimes continued. It was sort of like everybody was choosing up sides. Six black jurors sat at one table, six white jurors sat at the adjacent table. A mixed bag of black and white alternate jurors sat at yet another table toward the rear of the dining room. It started to both me. I thought, What’s it going to be like if we all keep separating according to race?” (Pg. 89)

He suggests, “Perhaps we O,J, jurors were a bunch of malcontents, crybabies who somehow ended up in the same group. But I don’t think so. That’s why it’s no surprise to me that we were the first jury in American history to revolt against the court.” (Pg. 94)

He recalls, “Then came…. The photographs of that bloody murder scene. No one… could look at those frightening photos without flinching. Everyone in that courtroom gasped. Family members sobbed, turned away, or reacted somehow. But inevitably, everyone forced themselves to look. Except O.J. Simpson. He NEVER looked at the mutilated bodies of his ex-wife and Ron Goldman.” (Pg. 127)

He says, “Days later, I recalled the photo of Ron Goldman when the defense presented their theory that professional hit men had committed this crime. Not in my opinion. This didn’t look like the work of a brutal professional. There was nothing methodical about it. This murder had passion and frenzy written all over it.” (Pg. 129)

He addresses Jeanette Harris’s charge that deputies gave the white jurors more time during a shopping trip, than were given to black jurors: “when my group left the store, we found Jeanette Harris and her group already outside. They had paid for their items and were ready to board the vans and leave. If her group of black jurors had been hustled outside by the white deputies, why hadn’t the same thing happened to my group of black jurors? The answer is, nothing of the sort occurred… it’s important to say that after six weeks of sequestration, I NEVER saw any hint of racism directed at black jurors by white deputies… Ask yourself this question: After Judge Ito removed three white sheriff’s deputies from juror guard duty---apparently because of Jeanette’s racism charge---why did the majority of the jurors come to court wearing black? It was a revolt against Judge Ito’s decision---but even more, against the mean-spirited attack on the white deputies and jurors by Jeanette Harris!” (Pg. 221-222)

He observes, “That’s what it was every time Johnnie [Cochran] and his crew went to work---a wake-up call! My fellow jurors and I would immediately sit up straighter, start paying attention. Believe me---when the Dream Team talked, the O.J. jury listened. Sure, I’ve said more than once that the prosecution’s powerful evidence impressed me. But the prosecutors themselves? … Marcia Clark, Christopher Darden… had a great case, but they never knew how to present it. They just couldn’t keep it sharp and simple… And all too often, when the prosecution came up to bat, We the Jury started fidgeting and getting restless.” (Pg. 262-263)

He explains, “One issue I have not touched on: the Dream Team’s police conspiracy theory. Do I believe it? Like most African Americans, I am extremely skeptical of statements and evidence offered by the police. But evidence showed that O.J. got preferential treatment from the LAPD. When Nicole called 911 in 1989, for instance, police… told O.J. to come downtown with them. Instead, O.J. took off in his car. Yet the police took no action. How many black men could have gotten away with ignoring a direct order from street cops? And there’s absolutely no doubt O.J. had many white police pals.” (Pg. 265)

Less presciently, he also predicts: “Before this… trial ends, there will be less than twelve jurors. However, Johnnie Cochran and the prosecution will agree to accept their verdict. And unless there is an eleventh-hour plea bargain made---O.J. Simpson will be convicted of murder.” (Pg. 268)

This is an interesting account of life on the jury, and of much of the trial. Readers should probably supplement it with the accounts of other jurors: Madam Foreman: A Rush to Judgment? and Mistrial of the Century: A Private Diary of the Jury System on Trial.
Private Diary of an O.J. Juror

Michael Knox was picked as a juror for the murder trial of O. J. Simpson. After he was dismissed from the jury he was contacted by Dove Books to write about his experiences. A new California law banned a juror from being paid for any information until after the trial ended. Lawyer Pierce O’Donnell sought a Federal injunction to set aside this law which violated the First Amendment (freedom of speech). This allowed this book to be published in 1995 before the trial ended.

Chapter 4 has Knox’s biography. [Was he the youngest in his family?] Chapter 7 tells about the selection of a jury, and the reactions at his workplace. Knox was downgraded with a 25% pay cut. Chapter 8 tells what happens when the jury is sequestered and the effect is has on the jurors, a group of people who are strangers to each other. Did this cause personal conflicts? Cliques formed (Chapter 10). Saturday night had conjugal visits; Sunday was family day.

The jurors never discussed the case (Chapter 19). The jurors were taken to the crime scene then to O. J. Simpson’s estate. There were personal conflicts among the jurors (Chapter 23). Knox was dismissed from the jury because of an old arrest which had been dropped (Chapter 24). There was a frenzy of reporters trying to interview Knox! The network that broadcast false allegations never published the truth. [The press often publishes sensations to distract and mislead the gullible public. Can they fool all of the people all of the time?]

Chapter 25 has his comments on his experiences as a juror. He rates the lawyers. He saw no racism by the deputies. Knox ends this book by making two predictions. Given the dismissal of the jurors there will be less than twelve jurors at trial’s end. And O. J. Simpson will be convicted of the murders! Knox only heard the prosecutor’s charges and not the defense’s arguments. Johnnie Cochran did not present the defense’s entire case to limit the trial and prevent further dismissals.

Stephen Singular was a journalist in Denver when he received a call in 1964 from a source in Los Angeles. He was told who planted the glove and that the blood evidence was tainted. Whenever OJ’s DNA was found it contained EDTA from the blood sample. His book “Legacy of Deception” complements this book as Singular could not finish his independent investigation. Once they learned of his activities the LAPD shadowed Singular.

When the police arrived at the crime scene at 12:15 am the red blood was still liquid. If they had been dead for about two hours the blood would be black and clotted. So who did it? In one of the novels “Perry Mason” said “murders committed by organized crime are seldom solved by the police unless they blame an innocent person”. Erle Stanley Gardner covered the 1943 murder of Sir Harry Oakes in the Bahamas. The press rarely mention the drug traffic that was in the background of this double murder.
Michael D. Knox was plucked from obscurity for the OJ trial. This book tells about his experience as a juror, until he was removed because of an unreported arrest (charges were dismissed). He argues against the sequestering of a jury (unless its for their own physical safety), and tells of the problems that ensued. (Sounds like that Survivor TV show?)
The most harmful event was how he was downgraded and reduced in pay after being selected for the jury. Can't Federal Express correct this injustice?
"If all the jurors were of the same color, there would be squabbles about hair color. If all had the same hair color, there would be clashes between those who wore glasses and those who didn't." Putting a lot of strangers together causes strains and conflict.
California then rushed a new law restricting jurors from selling their story. A Court case resulted in an injunction, and this book was published. Its an interesting book, but overtaken by events. After hearing the Prosecution's case (March 1995) he predicted that there would not be a full jury at the end, and OJ would be found guilty. We all know what came out after June when the Defense put on their case.