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I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom epub

by Patrick Allitt


I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom epub

ISBN: 0812218876

ISBN13: 978-0812218879

Author: Patrick Allitt

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Professionals & Academics

Language: English

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press (July 27, 2004)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB book: 1597 kb

FB2 book: 1845 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 243

Other Formats: txt lit azw txt





Patrick Allitt is Professor of . History at Emory University, where he holds the Arthur Blank Chair for Teaching Excellence. More significantly, "I'm the Teacher" led me to realize facts about the educational process nearly 35 years after I ended my undergraduate career.

Patrick Allitt is Professor of . He supervises workshops for Emory faculty interested in improving effective teaching skills. In particular, I feel embarassed about my lousy attitude and the frustration which that may have caused my most able professors and I can understand how a journeyman level of writing skills can compensate for all but the most deficient motivation.

Patrick Allitt is a renowned lecturer and educator (see his Great Courses class on teaching), so he gives useful advice. If you're looking for what to expect from undergraduate students in the classroom, this book is informative. If you're looking for how to teach a class, you won't find it. His recurring thesis is a wall of separation between teachers and counselors. You should be friendly Breezy but informative guide to teaching the humanities and social sciences in a university setting. What this book shows is what the professor expects from students and what students actually do. There is a rather large difference.

You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom. Publisher: University of Pennsylvania PressReleased: Aug 3, 2010ISBN: 9780812200409Format: book.

I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom. From the initial selection of reading materials through the assignment of final grades to each student, Patrick Allitt reports with keen insight and humor on the rewards and frustrations of teaching students who often are unable to draw a distinction between the words "novel" and "book. Readers get to know members of the class, many of whom thrive while others struggle with assignments, plead for better grades, and weep over failures. Related Podcast Episodes.

Home Browse Books Book details, I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester. I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom.

Although Allitt finds much to admire in today's students, he laments their frequent . The Allius are moving house but the semester doesn’t stop to oblige us.

Although Allitt finds much to admire in today's students, he laments their frequent lack of s who arrive in his classroom without basic writing skills, unpracticed with reading assignments. I loved it and thought it was a fine book, but it isn’t long before I find the students sullen, mutinous, and resistant.

Allitt's book confirms that they do. Allitt's book describes the progression of one class through a semester, session . Allitt's book describes the progression of one class through a semester, session by session. We watch him prepare for class, lecture and answer questions. I had the honor of taking two of Dr. Allitt's classes during my undergraduate time at Emory University-and I can tell you firsthand that "I'm the Teacher, You're the Student" is just as amazing, inspiring and absorbing as his classroom lectures. I am so touched that Dr. Allitt, who has authored many wonderful books that teach history, took the time to write a book about teaching history.

Download Im the Teacher, Youre the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom . 2 years ago by Foreverloving in Books EBooks.

Download Im the Teacher, Youre the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom or any other file from Books category. Although Allitt finds much to admire in today's students, he laments their frequent lack of preparedness students who arrive in his classroom without basic writing skills, unpracticed with reading assignments.

I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom (University of Pennsylvania .

I'm the Teacher, You're the Student: A Semester in the University Classroom (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004). Religion in America Since 1945: A History (Columbia University Press, 2005). The Conservatives: Ideas and Personalities in American History (Yale University Press, 2009).

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. What is it really like to be a college professor in an American classroom today? An award-winning teacher with over twenty years of experience answers this question by offering an enlightening and entertaining b. . What is it really like to be a college professor in an American classroom today? An award-winning teacher with over twenty years of experience answers this question by offering an enlightening and entertaining behind-the-scenes view of a typical semester in his American history course. The unique resultpart diary, part sustained reflectionrecreates both the unstudied realities and intensely satisfying challenges that teachers encounter in university lecture halls.

In this trenchant and often hilarious guide, Patrick Allitt takes the reader along to his course in American history, offering a teacher's-eye view of the undergraduate classroom. In this trenchant and often hilarious guide, Patrick Allitt takes the reader along to his course in American history, offering a teacher's-eye view of the undergraduate classroom.

What is it really like to be a college professor in an American classroom today? An award-winning teacher with over twenty years of experience answers this question by offering an enlightening and entertaining behind-the-scenes view of a typical semester in his American history course. The unique result—part diary, part sustained reflection—recreates both the unstudied realities and intensely satisfying challenges that teachers encounter in university lecture halls.

From the initial selection of reading materials through the assignment of final grades to each student, Patrick Allitt reports with keen insight and humor on the rewards and frustrations of teaching students who often are unable to draw a distinction between the words "novel" and "book." Readers get to know members of the class, many of whom thrive while others struggle with assignments, plead for better grades, and weep over failures. Although Allitt finds much to admire in today's students, he laments their frequent lack of preparedness—students who arrive in his classroom without basic writing skills, unpracticed with reading assignments.

With sharp wit, a critical eye, and steady sympathy for both educators and students, I'm the Teacher, You're the Student examines issues both large and small, from the ethics of student-teacher relationships to how best to evaluate class participation and grade writing assignments. It offers invaluable guidance to those concerned with the state of higher education today, to young faculty facing the classroom for the first time, and to parents whose children are heading off to college.

I had previously enjoyed three of Dr. Allitt's classes through The Teaching Company. His lecturing style is among the best of the many
fine presenters that organization uses, and he had become a favorite. When I came across this book, I hoped that his "style" would
translate into the written word. I really enjoyed this book. As a retired college professor, the subject interested me. Although he
teaches at a much more prestigious and selective school than the one I was affiliated with, I was surprised to find that his students
had some of the same difficulties as mine -- lack of adequate pre-college preparation, difficulty writing standard English, unwillingness to
give up memorization as a study technique, etc.

Dr. Allitt's thoughtful and dedicated approach to his teaching would be an inspiration to those considering academia as a home,
and his humanity and humor in dealing with his students could be an example to all of us in our everyday human relations.
Prof. Allitt's book recalling a semester of teaching a survey level US History course is the most entertaining and enjoyable thing I've read this year. I had some previous familiarity with his thoughts on academic subjects from several Teaching Company courses which he presented or in which he participated. All were quite good, but I found them generally orthodox, if accurate, approaches to the subject matter. In "I'm the Teacher" he shows a sharper critical edge, not to mention an abundance of dry British wit, each of which makes for entertaining reading while not descending to the "all my students are incomprehensible dullards" level. Nonetheless, Allitt implicitly delivers a powerful critique of American secondary education.

Although I've spent 7 years in undergraduate and post-graduate education, I must admit that I've had no idea of the professor's viewpoint, apart from that of a friend or two in law schools, given long after I graduated. In fact, as I read Allitt's book, I experienced a fair amount of guilt over my undergraduate attitudes, work habits and efforts, all of which were largely of the mediocre level of which he complains. Something, however, probably the efforts of the 4 or 5 excellent professors I had, motivated me to attempt continued learning and that pursuit is exceptionally rewarding in middle age. And that heightens the sense of what I missed by not being a better student years ago.

More significantly, "I'm the Teacher" led me to realize facts about the educational process nearly 35 years after I ended my undergraduate career. In particular, I feel embarassed about my lousy attitude and the frustration which that may have caused my most able professors and I can understand how a journeyman level of writing skills can compensate for all but the most deficient motivation. If Allitt's concerns were reduced to a single level of complaint, student writing would take the cake distantly followed perhaps by geographical ignorance. All in all, I wish that I either knew then what I now know (much better so, in fact, after reading this text) or at least had the maturity to intuit it. I'm not certain that this would be extremely helpful for a late adolescent about to enter college, but if I had a mature close relative in that position I would give it a try. As a matter of thoughtful reading for pleasure for adults though, I have no question about giving the highest recommendation.
I have recently been thrust into college level teaching in China by a strange twist of fate. With nothing to go on but "my own meandering experience" in life to guide me, I happened to come across professor Allitts book. Marvelous. A great walk through the grind of one course of teaching at his university that greatly helped me prepare for the 200 students that I was assigned to teach English to last semester. I also highly recommend his lectures from The Great Courses series, which are even more informative about coming up with a teacher persona that helps you help the students.
What an absolute pleasure to read. Doctor Allitt gives an overview of student-professor dynamics that is not only deep thinking and honest, but laugh out loud funny at times. It is a fascinating picture of the capabilities and idiosyncrasies of some of today's most talented students. Professor Allitt's writing style is a pleasure - witty and concise - it makes this book a page turner.