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Growing Up In Vietnam: Lessons in Life Learned From The Vietnam War epub

by Thomas J. Vogel


Growing Up In Vietnam: Lessons in Life Learned From The Vietnam War epub

ISBN: 0967874602

ISBN13: 978-0967874609

Author: Thomas J. Vogel

Category: Memoris

Language: English

Publisher: Bird Pub; First Edition edition (February 1, 2000)

Pages: 279 pages

ePUB book: 1673 kb

FB2 book: 1535 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 681

Other Formats: azw lit txt lrf





This book describes them all, but best of all, it gives lessons out of the fire for us al. Well written.

Growing Up In Vietnam: Lessons in Life Learned From The Vietnam War. by. Thomas J. Vogel. Lessons learned through Marine Corps tours in Vietnam. This book describes them all, but best of all, it gives lessons out of the fire for us al. Aug 26, 2013 Brian Rykhus rated it it was amazing. Great example of a young man growing and becoming a Christian thru the jungles of Vietnam. excellent lessons displayed on the path that nearly cost his life on several occasions.

4 quotes from Growing Up In Vietnam: Lessons in Life Learned From The Vietnam War: ‘life merely becomes a record of consequences that have been determine. Growing Up In Vietnam Quotes Showing 1-4 of 4. life merely becomes a record of consequences that have been determined by our decisions.

This book describes them all, but best of all, it gives lessons out of the fire for us al.

com User, May 17, 2000. I recently purchased several copies of this book, and sent them to my family and friends

com User, May 17, 2000. I recently purchased several copies of this book, and sent them to my family and friends. My dad who is an avid book reader, and big fan of books on history made the statement to me "This is possibly one of the best books I have ever read".

Lessons Learned from the Vietnam War. Robert G. Kaiser wrote in the Washington . Kaiser wrote in the Washington Post, "What's the lesson to be learned? Modesty. The Vietnam War is sometimes called McNamara's War. In his 1995 book "In Retrospect," Robert S. McNamara wrote: "We of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations who participated in the decisions on Vietnam acted according to what we thought were the principals and traditions of this nation.

Growing Up in Vietnam: Lessons in Life Learned from the Vietnam War by Thomas J. Vogel (2000, Paperback). The Red Circle : My Life in the Navy Seal Sniper Corps and How I Trained America's Deadliest Marksmen by Brandon Webb and John David Mann (2013, Paperback).

Growing Up in Vietnam: Lessons in Life Learned from the Vietnam War by Thomas J. Б/у: 241,90 RUB. Vietnam War. 2000. Brothers Forever : The Enduring Bond Between a Marine and a Navy SEAL That Transcended Their Ultimate Sacrifice by Tom Manion and Tom Sileo (2014, Hardcover).

Vietnam veterans and former Senators Bob Kerrey (D-NE) and Charles Robb (D-VA) joined Admiral William McRaven (Retired) in a discussion about the changes in America’s foreign and military policies after the Vietnam War. The panel was moderated by Ma. . The panel was moderated by Mark Lawrence, history professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Lessons Learned was a panel at a three-day Vietnam War Summit held at the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia. Aging American boomers are living a lifestyle reminiscent of Florida, Nevada and Arizona, but in Vietnam, the Los Angeles Times recently reported. For many Americans, those names invoke powerful memories and images of unspeakable violence, and perhaps the last places on earth to consider visiting. Yet not only are more US veterans and retirees visiting Southeast Asia, an increasing number have decided to call it home. including the help of a cook and a cleaner. That just might be the mother of all ironies.

Book by Vogel, Thomas J.
I purchased this book because it was written by a member of the exact same unit that I was in in Vietnam, Kilo 3/7, 2nd Platoon. I was there in 1967 and left after being wounded just months before Dr. Vogel arrived in country. Reading his memoir was like reliving my own tour and conjured up new memories, it was like he was telling my own story. I spent many days at the Liberty Bridge, On Hill 10, 37, 41 &55. I would recommend this for anyone interested in knowing more about the war in Vietnam. I knew almost every name on the list of Marines killed in action in 67 listed in the book.I also served under Capt. Fegan, the authors mentor. Well done Dr. Vogel.
I read Dr Vogel's book. I did so to find out how my former Company, Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment (K 3/7), had come along since my last wound received in August 1966, my departure from South Vietnam. The differences were sadly remarkable.

I had joined with K 3/7, in November 03, 1965, in an interesting way. I arrived at DaNang Air base on November 02, 1965, and the next day I was sent to Chu Lai on an early flight, there is was taken to the 7th Marine Regimental Headquarters, and was given a speech by the Commanding Officer of the 7th Marine Regiment, and told that the unit I was being assigned to was going into action this day, and there was a vehicle waiting to take me to the Battalion Headquarters to be assigned to a unit. The Colonel wished both I and another marine the best best of good luck and dismissed us to be taken to our units. We rode on a flatbed 106 platform called a mule, several Kilometers to the west to the 3rd Battalion Headquarters, where it was we were issued rifle, ammo, helmet, and web-gear, and transported to the helicopter landing zone to the east of the Battalion area. It was there that I met with the members of Kilo Company. I was assigned to the First Fire-team, of the First Squad, of the First Platoon. I was asked by my squad leader, Corporal Brock, if I was a seasoned Marine, and I told him I was a rifleman with the 8th Marine Regiment at Camp Lejeune. He said to load up my magazines, and get ready to go, and he assigned me to Lance Corporal Barrone's Fire-team. I was asked the same things by Barrone, and within minutes, the helicopters had landed and we were boarded and on our way to Operation Black Ferret. The operation was a search and destroy operation 16 km south of Chu Lai, Quảng Ngãi Province, I Corps. On this particular operation, Correspondent Dickey Chapelle was killed by a mine booby-trap.

All in all, I was very lucky. The unit I had joined with was a very professional outfit. These men had been together before Vietnam, and they were the ones that had landed on Operation Starlight, some two and a half months prior to my coming aboard. The men that I was assigned to were very good about showing me things that would keep me alive in the war. They were very good leaders and teachers. In my time we fought in many an operation, and I was a casualty of war on two occasions, shot once on Operation Texas, and returned to the front after a stay st Guam Naval Hospital for 60 days, and blown up the second time in August 1966, which lead to my release from the Marine Corps in April 1967.

Sadly, the way Dr. Vogel describes the company, almost two years later, was an entirely different company.

Joseph P Carey, BSM/V PHM/Star K 3/7 65-66
the author's description of his Vietnam experience is typical of a combat Marine in I corps. But it is the first time i have read a summary of each chapter named "Lessons learned" at the end of the chapter. Very interesting and eye opening reading!
If you want a ground view of Marine grunt life in 'Nam, this is it.
I truly enjoyed the PURPOSE of this book...BUY IT. You will not regret it. Thank you Mr. Vogel for bearing your heart
The full reality of war comes through in this chronicle of daily events--from the mundane to the dramatic, the grimey to the horrific. The author takes us inside the realities of what goes on in becoming a soldier and fighting a war at close range. The sentiments expressed are not always pretty and the lessons learned not always justified. The bonding of soldiers in battle is extraordinary while their dehumanizing and insensitivity to death and destruction is troubling. War does more damage to those we commit to it than we can possibly comprehend or compensate. Judge for yourself what would become of you had you the same experience of terror, death and destruction. The author has found solace and meaning in the teachings of Scripture, but the death and destruction of so many for so little in the end must give everyone pause to reflect on the efficacy and necessity of war in all but the most extreme of circumstances.
This book has special meaning to me as it was authored by my brother. I was 17 when he left for Vietnam and was I totally engrossed in being a teenager in the 70's, not realizing what horrors he was put through. I would read his letters but never once thought he wouldn't come home to tell his stories. Now that I am an adult and a parent, I can fully appreciate what he and my parents must have gone through. I had a hard time putting it down, mainly because of the intensity with which he wrote and the outpouring of sincerity and honesty.
I believe every parent and teen should read this as lessons learned are not only a matter of commone sense but straight from the heart. He talks not only of himself in that horror but I felt he was speaking for thousands more who did not live to speak of the war. It will give you a different perspective of the Vietnam war, and you will come away with a happy heart for his survival and his love of life today.
I recently purchased several copies of this book, and sent them to my family and friends. My dad who is an avid book reader, and big fan of books on history made the statement to me "This is possibly one of the best books I have ever read". I have completed about 50% of the book and am growing towards the same conclusion. I guess the best way I can review this book is by saying this book is real, as well as the person who wrote it. This book comes alive with action, suspense, and real life stories from Vietnam. In my dad's words get the book, and you will never put it down!