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Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation epub

by Joseph J. Ellis


Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation epub

ISBN: 0375405445

ISBN13: 978-0375405440

Author: Joseph J. Ellis

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People

Language: English

Publisher: Knopf; 1st edition (October 17, 2000)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB book: 1620 kb

FB2 book: 1495 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 974

Other Formats: lrf rtf mbr mobi





Six chapters are presented, none dependent on the others (you can read them out of sequence), the longest being about forty pages, with the layout being similar to that used in the great book Profiles In Courage.

Six chapters are presented, none dependent on the others (you can read them out of sequence), the longest being about forty pages, with the layout being similar to that used in the great book Profiles In Courage. The togetherness and unity of purpose, so necessary during the Revolution, begins to erode on the road to the Constitution, yielding to a more diverse spectrum of human passion.

Founding Brothers book. This is a sentence found on page 80 of Joseph J. Ellis's Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation.

Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation. Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams. Mount Holyoke College professor Joseph Ellis delivers a course that is a chronological survey of the period from 1763 to 1800 and discusses the single most consequential event in all of American history, the American Revolution. The key figures during thi. First Family: Abigail and John.

Late in the book the revolutionary, Founding . The Founding Brothers would lack a beating heart were it not for Ellis’ dimensionalized portrayals of Washington, Hamilton, Jefferson, Madison, the Adamses, and Burr.

The Founding Brothers would lack a beating heart were it not for Ellis’ dimensionalized portrayals of Washington, Hamilton, Jefferson, Madison, the Adamses, and Burr.

JOSEPH J. ELLIS is the author of many works of American history including Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize; and American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson, which won the National Book Award. He recently retired from his position as the Ford Foundation Professor of History at Mount Holyoke College and lives in Amherst, Massachusetts, with his wife and their youngest son. Joseph John Ellis (born July 18, 1943) is an American historian whose work focuses on the lives and times of the founders of the United States of America. American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson won a National Book Award and Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for History Contents Thomas Jefferson. Ellis is the Ford Foundation Professor of History at Mount Holyoke College. Educated at the College of William and Mary and Yale University, he served as a captain in the army and taught at West Point before coming to Mount Holyoke in 1972

Joseph J. Educated at the College of William and Mary and Yale University, he served as a captain in the army and taught at West Point before coming to Mount Holyoke in 1972. He was dean of the faculty there for ten years

Joseph J. Ellis is the author of several books of American history, among them Passionate Sage: The Character . Ellis is the author of several books of American history, among them Passionate Sage: The Character and Legacy of John Adams and American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson, which won the 1997 National Book Award. He was educated at the College of William and Mary and Yale University and lives in Amherst, Massachusetts, with his wife, Ellen, and three sons.

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An illuminating study of the intertwined lives of the founders of the American republic--John Adams, Aaron Burr, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and George Washington.During the 1790s, which Ellis calls the most decisive decade in our nation's history, the greatest statesmen of their generation--and perhaps any--came together to define the new republic and direct its course for the coming centuries. Ellis focuses on six discrete moments that exemplify the most crucial issues facing the fragile new nation: Burr and Hamilton's deadly duel, and what may have really happened; Hamilton, Jefferson, and Madison's secret dinner, during which the seat of the permanent capital was determined in exchange for passage of Hamilton's financial plan; Franklin's petition to end the "peculiar institution" of slavery--his last public act--and Madison's efforts to quash it; Washington's precedent-setting Farewell Address, announcing his retirement from public office and offering his country some final advice; Adams's difficult term as Washington's successor and his alleged scheme to pass the presidency on to his son; and finally, Adams and Jefferson's renewed correspondence at the end of their lives, in which they compared their different views of the Revolution and its legacy.In a lively and engaging narrative, Ellis recounts the sometimes collaborative, sometimes archly antagonistic interactions between these men, and shows us the private characters behind the public personas: Adams, the ever-combative iconoclast, whose closest political collaborator was his wife, Abigail; Burr, crafty, smooth, and one of the most despised public figures of his time; Hamilton, whose audacious manner and deep economic savvy masked his humble origins; Jefferson, renowned for his eloquence, but so reclusive and taciturn that he rarely spoke more than a few sentences in public; Madison, small, sickly, and paralyzingly shy, yet one of the most effective debaters of his generation; and the stiffly formal Washington, the ultimate realist, larger-than-life, and America's only truly indispensable figure.Ellis argues that the checks and balances that permitted the infant American republic to endure were not primarily legal, constitutional, or institutional, but intensely personal, rooted in the dynamic interaction of leaders with quite different visions and values. Revisiting the old-fashioned idea that character matters, Founding Brothers informs our understanding of American politics--then and now--and gives us a new perspective on the unpredictable forces that shape history.
Founding Brothers by Joseph Ellis
Hardcover edition

Six chapters are presented, none dependent on the others (you can read them out of sequence), the longest being about forty pages, with the layout being similar to that used in the great book Profiles In Courage.

The togetherness and unity of purpose, so necessary during the Revolution, begins to erode on the road to the Constitution, yielding to a more diverse spectrum of human passion. Fault lines, held in check by the necessities of war, become increasingly apparent in the aftermath of peace. Here, deeper personal reflections take the founders in opposing directions; loyalties are questioned; etiquette and protocol become strained, in some cases fracturing those buried fault lines beyond the repair of civil discourse and famously demonstrated in the duel between Hamilton and Burr.

The plans and maneuvering of the battlefield had now moved to the less bloody theatre of parchment, quills and tables. There are no cannons here, but it’s clear to see that John Adams, by his own doing, set himself up to be everyone’s favorite cannon fodder.

A very well worded book, with gracefully crafted sentences containing so much more that their initial brevity might suggest. For example, Chapter Four, The Farwell: “Washington was the core of gravity that prevented the American Revolution from flying off into random orbits, the stable center around which the revolutionary energies formed.”
Very good book. Recommended.
When I started this book, I expected a historical accounting similar to other books covering this period. But, Ellis’s book went much further. Author Ellis enables a glimpse into the key figures and their issues during the country’s first-generation administrations. This contentious period gave rise to political parties. Because communications during this period depended on journals and mailings, ample written records exist. I can’t imagine the amount of research it took to locate and examine these, but the results are rewarding.

The book dealt with such “behind the scenes” subjects as the reasons for the Burr-Hamilton duel, the 1790 Quaker petition to end the African slave trade, and the formulation of Washington’s Farewell Address. But, the book was highlighted by the evolution of the Jefferson -Adams relationship: from friendship, to abhorrence; and after 12 years of silence, to reconciliation. Ellis guides us through this relationship to their later years. Here, they have put aside their individual differences to reflect, clarify the record, and focus on their places in history. The book ends on a surprising note.

This book was difficult to read. In explaining and analyzing deep and subtle topics, the book’s sentences could be complex and the paragraphs lengthy. I needed to re-read some sections to grasp their meanings. But, the extra time was worth the effort.
This is one of the most well-known work on early American history. Ellis's argument of the gentlemanly American Revolution, which stresses consensus and compromise, is persuasive. His analysis of John Adams is more sympathetic than the mainstream view. This book is a good bridge to link general readership and academic scholarship. In an era of polarizing politics and increasing hostile interaction between different parts of the society, politicians and laymen alike should really look into the days of Washington and understand some of the true values of American political structure.
Well written, well researched description of several pivotal events in the formation of our republic. Accentates how important is was then as it is now to have men/women in power that have VISION. Even though they had almost absolute power, their integrity and motives were directed towards creating a NEW COUNTRY, imagine that, creating a new country. Seems like an impossible task.
If the events shown in this book had turned out differently we may be having High Tea @ 4 O’clock and speaking The King’s English.
Jolly good....

Bottom line- you are reading how a small group of men who faced almost impossible odds shaped our country into what it is today. The same debates on “Big Government” vs States rights to govern themselves, taxes, foreign policy are still wildly debated today....
Fascinating reading, Especially the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, why it happened, the results of its outcome and how ONE event can change everything
How you feel about this book will be largely dependent upon what you expect going into it. So I will tell you right now, this is not a narrative, it's more of a collection of essays, each focused on a specific event or relationship. At least, that is my take anyways. I do audio books and I have been listening to a lot of fiction lately, so it was a bit jarring to go from a narrative to the slower pace of this book. I listened to it as if it were the build up to the story but that never happened. I eventually got used to it, for the most part. It still reads slowly at times. On the other hand, some points I found so interesting I would have to stop to think and process the issue that was being discussed. I can't really say anything more without spoilers.

I have read a few things about the founding fathers, most recently a biography on Jefferson. And even being familiar with the characters and events, Ellis presents topics that I haven't heard discussed in much detail, or at least presents them from new angles.

I would give this book 4 and half stars if I could, because of the parts I found slow, but because of the description of slavery and elitism I will round up to 5 stars, instead of down to 4.