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The Hammer: God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress epub

by Jan Reid,Lou Dubose


The Hammer: God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress epub

ISBN: 1586482386

ISBN13: 978-1586482381

Author: Jan Reid,Lou Dubose

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People

Language: English

Publisher: PublicAffairs; First Edition edition (September 28, 2004)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB book: 1493 kb

FB2 book: 1512 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 961

Other Formats: mobi lrf mbr rtf





I'd recommend it even if they weren't friends of mine, which they are" - Molly Ivans. this book opens a window not only on DeLay but the new Republican House and how it operates. - October 22, 2004, Baltimore Chronicle. One of the Republican reforms implemented after the 1994 takeover of the House was to greatly reduce the power of formerly powerful committee chairmen who had presided with baronial independence based on a rigid system of seniority.

I'd recommend it even if they weren't friends of mine, which they are" - Molly Ivans.

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Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Hammer: Tom DeLay God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress.

In The Hammer Lou Dubose and Jan Reid track DeLay's rise to the pinnacle of power, illuminating not only his personality and policies, but the forces in American politics that have made him a player

In The Hammer Lou Dubose and Jan Reid track DeLay's rise to the pinnacle of power, illuminating not only his personality and policies, but the forces in American politics that have made him a player. well as his deep ties to the evangelical Christian right. The Hammer details how DeLay turned his anti-regulatory stances into the largest and most organized political funding network ever seen, harnessed the political power of the evangelical movement, and made lobbyists the workhorses for Republican policy. It explains why the changes DeLay has spearheaded in the way politics works are likely to last for at least the next quarter-century.

by Jan Reid and Lou Dubose. Now there is a six-year limit on their chairmanships, support staff have been cut one-third (limiting their ability to analyze issues), each party's study groups were eliminated (provided brief summaries of bills), and the Speaker has the ability to appoint/replace chairmen.

Lou Dubose has written about Texas and national politics for thirty years. In 2003 he wrote (with Texas Monthly writer Jan Reid) The Hammer: Tom DeLay, God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress. He was co-author (with Molly Ivins) of Shrub and Bushwhacked.

The Hammer NPR coverage of The Hammer: Tom DeLay: God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress by Lou Dubose and Jan Reid. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more. Tom DeLay: God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress. by Lou Dubose and Jan Reid. Lou Dubose and Jan Reid. Your purchase helps support NPR programming.

Louis (Lou) Dubose is an American journalist . The Hammer: Tom DeLay: God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress with Jan Reid (Public Affairs, 2004). Boy Genius: Karl Rove, the Brains Behind the Remarkable Political Triumph of George W. Bush with Jan Reid and Carl M. Cannon (Public Affairs, 2003).

Last month PublicAffairs published The Hammer: Tom DeLay, God, Money, and the Rise of the Republican Congress, by Austin authors Lou Dubose and Jan Reid. The book recounts the life and career of . House Majority Leader DeLay, R-Sugar Land, who rose from South Texas oil fields to small pest-control businessman, to Texas state representative, to eventually become the most powerful member of the .

The New Republican House of Representatives began with the bang of an oversized gavel made for Newt Gingrich to convene the 1995 session. Gingrich, note the authors--longtime journalists in Texas--flamed out within three years. But the changes he ushered in have endured, and they have been drastic. Today, Tom DeLay presides over a House that has all but banished bipartisan committee work, meaningful floor debate, and collaboration and social relations across party lines. In the current system, Democrats' views are all but irrelevant. Dubose and Reid trace the evangelical Speaker's career from his early days in the Texas Legislature, and explain why the changes he helped spearhead are likely to last for the next quarter-century or more. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
The interesting thing about this is the subject rather than the writing or the style of the book. I found that I labored reading this rather than enjoying it. However, it does get three stars because it was revealing about Tom Delay whom the author presented as interesting and disturbing, an American Machiavelli.

We learn a little bit of his character by his pettiness in his reaction to lawsuits against him, and his membership in a club that, using a play on words, has the initials KKK. These things give a little glimpse into the man's vindictiveness and racism. We also learn about Delay's utter insensitivity toward others with such pronouncements explaining why he didn't serve in the army--because enlistments were being taken by Blacks and Latinos, and he did not want to deny them the high pay that the Army was providing. Gee, that was big of him.

Such insensitivity turns to the pathological in his defense of "free market economics" in American Samoa. An unscrupulous asian businessman named Tan needed labor to have his products reach American markets. Convincing dirt poor Asians that their family members will get jobs in America, they go further in debt to pay the thousands of dollars required for job selection. The unwitting worker deplanes on American territory (American Samoa) and works under sweatshop conditions fourteen hours a day. They live in a virtual barracks with little sustenance, privacy or sanitation. Managers impregnate these defenseless female employees who are then forced to have abortions. In the meantime, they get further into debt producing clothes that proudly bear the title, "American made." Even Delay applauds the free-market economics and capitalism in Samoa.

We learn that during his stay in a swanky Samoan hotel, his time on the golf links, and at sumptuous banquets, desperate workers are trying to pass notes to him and his entourage to let him know of the desperate conditions under which they labor. Oblivious, Delay will block any attempt by congress to enact or improve working conditions on the island. One wonders if any of those notes addressed the forced abortions to which he is so opposed in this country!

His machiavellian skill is evident in congress as he extends the deadlines of votes for some old-fashioned arm-twisting and bribery. This true-to-life ogre may have changed the way congress does business forever. He shuts out the traditional bi-partisan debate on bills, and even demands what he expects from lobbyists--rather than the other way around. He is ultimately censured several times by a bi-partisan ethics committee.

Update: Tom Delay has since resigned his seat in disgrace, and will probably, or at least hopefully, go to jail. We must hope that his congressional legacy is not allowed to continue.

Recently a convention which held the theme that Christians are being persecuted in this country called Tom Delay a fine christian man. The main speaker said that they (I guess that means the rest of us) were after Delay because of his Christian faith, and his belief in Jesus Christ.

The one good thing about being the victim is, you don't have to accept responsibility for your actions.

Amen!
One of the Republican reforms implemented after the 1994 takeover of the House was to greatly reduce the power of formerly powerful committee chairmen who had presided with baronial independence based on a rigid system of seniority. Now there is a six-year limit on their chairmanships, support staff have been cut one-third (limiting their ability to analyze issues), each party's study groups were eliminated (provided brief summaries of bills), and the Speaker has the ability to appoint/replace chairmen. This new environment provided the power vacuum for Majority Leader DeLay to grab power.

DeLay dodged Vietnam service via student and marriage deferments. DeLay first ran for Congress after the EPA banned Mirex - one of the few chemicals that kill fire ants. This was particularly offensive to DeLay who had been an exterminator, albeit a marginally successful one. (The IRS had filed liens in '79, '80, '83 for failure to pay withheld income and Social Security taxes from DeLay's employees.) DeLay had been a three-term member of the Texas legislature (few remember him at that time) at the time he first ran for Congress in 1984.

DeLay's first focus was the pornography and banality of grants supported by the National Endowment for the Arts - with a few others from Texas the result was an $8 million cut in their funding. DeLay was a heavy drinker at the time, but after seeing one of Dr. James Dobson's TV presentations he became very upset about now spending much time with his daughter, and he became a "Born-Again" Baptist.

DeLay got on the Republican Committee on Committees as a freshman, making him part of those who allocate seats and can thereby cultivate favor. Upon re-election DeLay moved to the powerful Appropriations Committee, though that never was his real interest.

1994 was a banner year for House Republicans. Between Hillary's healthcare reform bill (supported by President Clinton, but massacred by insurance companies), Clinton's support for gays in the military (created upsetness among evangelical Christians), and the assault weapons ban (prompted the NRA to donate $70 million to support candidates to its liking), the Republicans took control. DeLay got into the practice of using his PAC to buy loyalty of members by contributing to their campaigns and providing training for political candidates he supported; he furthered his strength by also getting lobbyists on his rolodex to also help support those same candidates directly. DeLay became the Republican Whip, and selected Hastert as chief deputy.

Moving further, DeLay started the "K Street Project" - lobbyists united behind the concept of freeing business from government taxation and regulation. (When asked, DeLay replied that he could not think of a Federal regulation he would keep intact.) Saipan (an American protectorate) offers an example of DeLay's regulation-free utopia - DeLay worked to prevent U.S. labor laws from applying there, leaving intact the practice of $3/hour wages, less deductions for food and lodging (ten to a room), large fees assessed outsiders to enter for a job, and minimal benefits, and forcing acceptance of an Enron (large DeLay donor) proposal for a new power-plant.

Dubose moves on to summaries of various DeLay protégés in charge of fund-raising that skirted laws limiting the amounts from individuals and corporations - the process involved shuffling funds, and where possible, also hiding IDs. While some of the participants were forced to pay fines, others maneuvered around to achieve dismissal of their case. DeLay, however, was untouched.

Another key DeLay action, according to Dubose, was his forcing the House to go beyond voting censure of President Clinton for the Lewinsky affair, to the much bigger act of impeachment.

DeLay's greatest "innovation" was forcing lobbying groups to accept Republican approval of those filling key leadership positions - those that did not simply did not get access. DeLay forced the issue when he pulled a key piece of legislation for the Electronic Industries Alliance on copyright protection that had been worked on for over a year when they moved to hire a Democrat head. (DeLay was later censured by the House Ethics Committee over this action; regardless, the practice of approving lobbying group leadership remains firmly in place.) Criteria considered were three: 1)Is the applicant a Republican? 2)How much has he/she contributed to the Republican party, candidates, and PACs? 3)Has the applicant contributed to the Democrat part, candidates, and PACs? Lobbyists are now told to lean on House members to whom they have contributed money and tell them how the party wants them to vote.

DeLay and Rove then joined forces to change Texas districting to favor Republicans. The first outcome was that 18 of 21 hand-picked conservative Republicans won Texas legislative races, taking over the law-making in that state. They then redistricted ("gerrymandered" according to opponents) so that 5 - 7 more Republicans would win election to Congress, as well as defeat some of Bush's sharpest critics. (DeLay has been indicted by local officials for his role in financing this transition.)

DeLay supports Israel (forced Bush to withdraw support for Palestine), solicits money from Jewish groups, and looks forward to "The Day" (Apocalypse).

DeLay's greatest vulnerability at this time appears to be his close association with lobbyists Jack Abramoff, charter member of DeLay's K-Street "kitchen cabinet" lobbying group. Abramoff and associates took $45 million in Indian tribe lobbying fees - over the same time period G.M.'s total lobbying was less, as was the big four in pharmaceuticals. This amount was about 25% of one tribes entire budget - reportedly squeezed out of them through scare tactics.

"The Hammer" does a good job of explaining the source of Congressman DeLay's power, and is interesting reading.