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The Most Dangerous Man in America: The Making of Douglas MacArthur epub

by Mark Perry


The Most Dangerous Man in America: The Making of Douglas MacArthur epub

ISBN: 0465013287

ISBN13: 978-0465013289

Author: Mark Perry

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Leaders & Notable People

Language: English

Publisher: Basic Books; 1 edition (April 1, 2014)

Pages: 416 pages

ePUB book: 1471 kb

FB2 book: 1519 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 221

Other Formats: mbr rtf txt azw





Mark Perry's enjoyable The Most Dangerous Man in America amply captures the general's 'proud and egotistical' streak. ―Wall Street Journal. A deft portrayal centered mainly on MacArthur's World War II years.

Mark Perry's enjoyable The Most Dangerous Man in America amply captures the general's 'proud and egotistical' streak. Without ever denying MacArthur's flaws and mistakes, Perry revives the general's reputation by carefully and positively appraising his role in some of the war's key moments. ―David Crist, Senior Historian, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Foreign Affairs.

Douglas MacArthur In September 1943, Roosevelt wrote to MacArthur that his wife Eleanor would be coming to Australia to tour military hospitals: I am delighted that she will be able to see yo. .

Douglas MacArthur In September 1943, Roosevelt wrote to MacArthur that his wife Eleanor would be coming to Australia to tour military hospitals: I am delighted that she will be able to see you. t MacArthur railed at the distraction. I don’t like that woman coming here to spy on my personal life and carry gossip back to Washington, he told his staff. I cannot have her here. He fobbed her off on Bob Eichelberger and then onto his wife Jean, who hosted a luncheon for her in Brisbane. MacArthur’s discourtesy was self-defeating-he came off as narrow-minded and boorish.

More Advance Praise for The Most Dangerous Man in America Second only to his monumental self-regard was . Printed in the United States of America.

More Advance Praise for The Most Dangerous Man in America Second only to his monumental self-regard was Douglas MacArthur’s ability to polarize those who encountered him. Thus Mark Perry’s. For information, address Basic Books, 250 West 57th Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10107.

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General of the Army Douglas MacArthur was one of the most shameless self-promoters in history. In April 1951, after MacArthur gave his famous farewell address to Congress ( Old soldiers never die, they just fade away ), Rep. Dewey Short of Missouri cried out, We heard God speak today, God in the flesh, the voice of God! When MacArthur was cast (and posed) as the hero of Corregidor in the opening days of World War II, mothers named their newborns after him. Others, more familiar with the general and his moods, were less enraptured

Mark Perry (born 1950) is an American author specializing in military, intelligence, and foreign affairs analysis. The Most Dangerous Man in America: The Making of Douglas MacArthur.

Mark Perry (born 1950) is an American author specializing in military, intelligence, and foreign affairs analysis  .

I came across both The Most Dangerous Man in America & Supreme Commander in the NY Times Book . This book details the relationship between FDR and Douglas MacArthur. The main emphasis of the book, however, is MacArthur

A well told story of a very complex man who led us to Pacific victory in World War II, rebuilt Japan and salvaged disaster in Korea. Unfortunately MacArthur is not well understood in today's America. The main emphasis of the book, however, is MacArthur. A summary of his family roots and the career of his father is described, as is the relationship with his mother which had a big impact on his life.

Douglas MacArthur and Franklin Roosevelt first met in 1916 when both were involved in planning prewar mobilization for .

Douglas MacArthur and Franklin Roosevelt first met in 1916 when both were involved in planning prewar mobilization for the Woodrow Wilson administration.

The Most Dangerous Man begins with a vignette in which Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in a conversation with an.The first is Douglas MacArthur

The Most Dangerous Man begins with a vignette in which Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in a conversation with an associate, describes Huey Long as the second most dangerous man in America. When asked if Long was second, who then was the most dangerous, Roosevelt responded, "Huey is only second. The first is Douglas MacArthur. Perry's book is not about MacArthur as much as it is about Roosevelt and MacArthur. The careers of these two great men ran together beginning in the 1930s when MacArthur served as chief of staffof the Army and beyond Roosevelt's death.

Historian Mark Perry has crafted a perceptive, authoritative biography of the legendary general. But the words and actions of "The Most Dangerous Man in America" live on. And we have many more of them to ponder thanks to this perceptive book. Randy Dotinga is a Monitor contributor. Chapter & Verse Junot Diaz and other writers are awarded MacArthur genius grants.

At times, even his admirers seemed unsure of what to do with General Douglas MacArthur. Imperious, headstrong, and vain, MacArthur matched an undeniable military genius with a massive ego and a rebellious streak that often seemed to destine him for the dustbin of history. Yet despite his flaws, MacArthur is remembered as a brilliant commander whose combined-arms operation in the Pacific—the first in the history of warfare—secured America's triumph in World War II and changed the course of history. In The Most Dangerous Man in America, celebrated historian Mark Perry examines how this paradox of a man overcame personal and professional challenges to lead his countrymen in their darkest hour. As Perry shows, Franklin Roosevelt and a handful of MacArthur's subordinates made this feat possible, taming MacArthur, making him useful, and finally making him victorious. A gripping, authoritative biography of the Pacific Theater's most celebrated and misunderstood commander, The Most Dangerous Man in America reveals the secrets of Douglas MacArthur's success—and the incredible efforts of the men who made it possible.
I have read several books concerning General Douglas MacArthur. A few have been scathing, giving him hell for just about everything he did (the author Stanley Weintraub does not think much of him) some are admiring (William Manchester comes to mind). Mark Perry, in this excellent book, does not fall under either category. He looks at the record and the relationship between MacArthur and President Franklin Roosevelt and Army Chief of Staff George Marshal and calls the shots as he sees them. He obviously believes that all three of these men were good men and talented men. They needed each other during hard times. They helped form each others' characters and ideas. In the end, MacArthur was brilliant as a military commander, perhaps even a genius, all the while earning the anger of other people with his arrogance and near paranoia that others were against him. Perry has done a great job of separating the faults of the man from his sometimes astonishing successes. We are lucky that he took the time to do so and then write this book.
Excellent but far too long. This is a historical non fiction book with too much minutiae .
Should have been far shorter BUT there are so many interesting anecdotes about MacArthur that they do carry the reader along.
If you are a fan of history and enjoy many, many facts then definitely buy this book.
I do recommend it.
The title is misleading. It reflects Roosevelt's fear of a presidential rival in an upcoming election. MacArthur came out of WWII a great hero. At the time of the Korean Conflict, most Americans took his side when Truman fired him as commanding general. But over time Truman's reputation has been rehabilitated and MacArthur's star has dimmed. Much of this was due to the published memoirs of his colleagues, Eisenhower included, showing his arrogant and petty side. Author Perry does not gloss over these defects, yet manages to burnish his reputation. MacArthur was in an impossible position when the Japanese invaded the Philippines. There was no possibility of relief. His escape to Australia was inglorious. In his efforts to keep his promise to return, MacArthur had to fight not only the enemy, but Roosevelt and the Europe First policy, the Navy and their central Pacific campaign, as well as the the program equip Russia. All these prevented the general from getting needed supplies. These are clearly detailed.
My ancestor, Frazier Hunt, was included in this book, as well as his dear friend, Brig. Gen. Bonner Fellers ("Uncle Bonner"). As someone who is pursuing his PhD at Penn State with an emphasis on MacArthur and Fellers, I must say that I LOVED this book. This author gets it. He synthesized all the current history and wrote a piece that is understandable for not only the general public, but also scholars and/or hard-core Southwest Pacific Area schelps like me. There were only a few factual errors...and they were minor. e.g., the author mistakenly wrote that the 28th Infantry Division was sent to the SWPA. It wasn't. I also take some umbrage with the author's description of Uncle Bonner and my great-grand father, Frazier Hunt, but, by in large, he was dead on. The reader will esp. enjoy the interesting relationship that MacArthur had with Roosevelt and the other sharks in the shark tank (sorry, Virginia, but most in the high command hated each other), the difficult decisions that had to be made, and humanized MacArthur...something my great-grandfather passed down to my grandfather, mother, and uncles. Thank you, Mr. Perry.
This book joins a pile of others about the famous American General and commander of the South-West Pacific Theater during World War II. What sets it apart, I believe, is Perry's emphasis on two main points. The first is McArthur's openness and honesty with his superiors, first with President Roosevelt and later with Chief of Staff of the Army, General George Marshall, which gave the latter two men insight into the true inner workings of the War Department and the Army. Although General MacArthur could be friendly, he may have had few friends; he apparently judged people solely on their effectiveness, which enabled Roosevelt and Marshall to select people for responsible positions during WWII whose names we revere today. It also enabled Roosevelt and Marshall to trust McArthur with vast resources, responsibilities, and authorities never before or since entrusted to an American military officer.

The second point that Perry brings out about McArthur is the latter's development of self-awareness. McArthur became almost chameleon-like in his ability to adapt his behavior and demeanor to the people and situations around him. McArthur's adaptability enabled him to get along well with, and secure cooperation from, Australians who were most of his infantry for the first years of his command and later with powerful Navy commanders who apparently were determined that the Pacific Theater was going to be solely a Navy show.

What may annoy you about Perry's new book is his version of "facts" about Douglas MacArthur's life and their correlation with those printed in other sources. On the one hand, you may wish that the author was in the same room with you so you could throw his book at him and scream "Why couldn't you have gotten the small stuff right?" On the other hand, it is possible that Perry is right and the other sources wrong, but how long would it take to find out? However, on some third appendage you may ask "What are the implications if both sets of "facts" are correct?" For example, if it's true that when McArthur entered the Philippines he celebrated his birthday in November, given that other sources list it as being in January, what does that say?

In summary, this is a fascinating book which not only will you find it almost impossible to put down, but also you may have difficulty falling asleep as you replay portions of it in your mind. Mark Perry is to be congratulated on a totally new take on a great, famous, and effective American personality who influenced hugely and positively the people and countries United States dealt with in the Pacific during and after the Second World War.