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The House of Godwine: The History of a Dynasty epub

by Emma Mason


The House of Godwine: The History of a Dynasty epub

ISBN: 1852853891

ISBN13: 978-1852853891

Author: Emma Mason

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Historical

Language: English

Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (March 4, 2004)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB book: 1706 kb

FB2 book: 1652 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 633

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Emma Mason is a Emeritus Reader in History at Birkbeck College, University of London, and the author of many books and articles on Medieval England. I would say The House of Godwine is not an ideal history for beginners

Emma Mason is a Emeritus Reader in History at Birkbeck College, University of London, and the author of many books and articles on Medieval England. I would say The House of Godwine is not an ideal history for beginners. It is not light reading, but for someone versed in the basics, the details here are welcome and useful. I picked up many things I hadn't run across before.

In The House of Godwine, Emma Mason tells the turbulent story of a remarkable family which, until Harold Godwineson was king of England from January 1066 until his death at Hastings in October of that year. For much of the reign of Edward the Confessor, who was married to Harold’s sister Eadgyth, the Godwine family, led by Earl Godwine, had dominated English politics. In The House of Godwine, Emma Mason tells the turbulent story of a remarkable family which, until Harold’s unexpected defeat, looked far more likely than the dukes of Normandy to provide the long-term rulers of England.

The House of Godwine: The History of a Dynasty. Great Tales from English History: The Truth About King Arthur, Lady Godiva, Richard the Lionheart, and More by Robert Lacey, 2004. p. 178. ^ "Schlachtfeld bei Hastings". Projekt Gutenberg-DE. House of Godwine: The History of Dynasty by Emma Mason, 2004. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Lines: 176-2, 176A-4, 177-1. Who Was Eddeva?' by . Transactions of East Riding Antiquarian Society, Volume 4 (1896); pages 11–22.

In The House of Godwine Emma Mason tells the turbulent story of a remarkable family which, until Harold's unexpected defeat, looked far more likely than the dukes of Normandy to provide the long-term rulers of England. But for the Norman conquest, an Anglo-Saxon England ruled by the Godwine dynasty would have developed very differntly from that dominated by the Normans.

Harold Godwineson was king of England from January 1066 until his death at Hastings in October of that year.

In The Rise and Fall of the House of Godwine, Emma Mason tells the turbulent story of a remarkable family .

In The Rise and Fall of the House of Godwine, Emma Mason tells the turbulent story of a remarkable family which, until Harold’s unexpected defeat, looked far more likely than the dukes of Normandy to provide the long-term rulers of England. But for the Norman Conquest, an Anglo-Saxon England ruled by the Godwine dynasty would have developed very differently from that dominated by the Normans.

Author: Mason, Emma Publisher: Hambledon & London. Cover Type: Hard Year published: 2004 ISBN: 1852853891.

In his 2002 book The Godwins, Frank Barlow sympathetically examined the arguments put forward by Anscombe and Lundie Barlow. The House of Godwine: The History of a Dynasty. He included a family tree based on their work, showing Godwin's descent from Æthelred I, and at one point described Wulfnoth Cild as the son of Æthelmær the Stout. London, UK: Hambledon and London.

This book studies some of the more characteristic elements of the common style used by the vernacular historians. Their detached and "self-conscious" authorial presentation is particularly notable: it is seen both in the prologues and epilogues to their works, where they present their source materials as reliable, themselves as serious scholars, and their works as worthy of belief, and constantly throughout the text as the historians direct audience response to their work. Все результаты Поиска книг Google Библиографические данные.

Harold Godwineson was king of England from January 1066 until his death at Hastings in October of that year. For much of the reign of Edward the Confessor, who was married to Harold's sister Eadgyth, the Godwine family, led by Earl Godwine, had dominated English politics. In The Rise and Fall of the House of Godwine, Emma Mason tells the turbulent story of a remarkable family which, until Harold's unexpected defeat, looked far more likely than the dukes of Normandy to provide the long-term rulers of England. But for the Norman Conquest, an Anglo-Saxon England ruled by the Godwine dynasty would have developed very differently from that dominated by the Normans.

I read this book some months ago, and today, as I was looking up a detail for more clarification, I realized that this volume was full of paper slips marking important passages. Then I realized I never reviewed this book which I keep on hand while working on my historical fiction projects. Well, I suppose this is a classic case of taking a book for granted, since I'm still actively using it.

I find "The House of Godwine" to be a clear, detailed and useful history that goes farther than merely recording pertinent details. Emma Mason skillfully puts "two and two" together and ventures to explain how certain events occurred or why people did what they did. For instance, when Harold launched his lightning attack on the court of Gruffydd ap Llewelyn in 1062: "It has been suggested that Aelfgar died in the Christmas season, possibly while attending court, and that this opportunity was seized to attack his ally Gruffydd ap Llewelyn before he learned of the earl's death and could reinforce his own position." Now, I knew about the Christmas campaign for years but never thought to associate it with Aelfgar's death. This may or may not have happened as suggested, but the explanation is compelling.

In case you are wondering, yes, Emma uses extensive Notes to support her work. In fact, out of 281 pages, the Notes and Index start on page 203. As far as I can tell, she used her sources to best describe an event (such as the Battle of Hastings), then gave references every step of the way. So at Hastings, for instance, she gave us a depiction of the battle with notes every few sentences referencing many different sources. All told the battle description was thorough and it made a lot of sense. The same technique is used throughout the book.

I would say The House of Godwine is not an ideal history for beginners. It is not light reading, but for someone versed in the basics, the details here are welcome and useful. I picked up many things I hadn't run across before. Another for-instance: "Harold knew that Norman plans for invasion of England were now well under way. William of Poitiers wrote that he sent spies to report back with more detailed information. One of these men was captured and his cover story was blown. He was taken before the duke, but instead of condemning him William seized the opportunity to send a message intended to demoralize his rival..." That's the kind of detail I just gobble up!

The book starts with a good overview of England's culture and politics before and during Aethelred's reign, and ends with how the survivors after Hastings dealt with the new regime. This is where I discovered that Count Alain le Rouge, who led the Breton contingent at Hastings, carried off Edith Swanneck's daughter Gunhild from her exile at Wilton abbey. Since Alain held much of the land previously owned by Gunhild's mother, the daughter's presence presumably calmed his Anglo-Danish tenants. She stayed with him until he died then became his brother's partner in turn. I learned this tidbit just in time to incorporate it into my debut novel. Needless to say, I was thrilled. This is one book I will have to read more than once.
Recently I've been reading many histories of this period. This book provides some extra, well researched facts that I had not read before, and amplifies others that I had read. Great addition to my Edward/Harold/William library.
This volume is based on a course the author taught at the University of London and is enhanced by her discussions with colleagues at the annual Battle Conference on Anglo-Norman Studies, which is to say she knows what she's talking about when it comes to perspectives of conquest, especially as they pertain to (in this case) the losers. Certainly, Harold Godwinson is remembered mostly for having lost his kingdom at Hastings, but the family went on to be both glorified and demonized. Where did all this status come from? The hard facts regarding the family's wealth and power survive to some extent in official records but the narrative context is all prejudicial in one direction or the other. Mason tries to correct this by tracing the role of the kin-group in Anglo-Saxon society, and the importance of the church (which Godwine and his descendants carefully supported), and the astute political maneuvering by the founder of the family during the reign of Canute, the canny Danish interloper. An expert study and a good starting point for further examination of the kingdom-as-family-business.