» » Hitler And Stalin: Parallel Lives

Hitler And Stalin: Parallel Lives epub

by Alan Bullock


Hitler And Stalin: Parallel Lives epub

ISBN: 0394586018

ISBN13: 978-0394586014

Author: Alan Bullock

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Historical

Language: English

Publisher: Knopf; 1st American ed edition (March 17, 1992)

Pages: 1081 pages

ePUB book: 1981 kb

FB2 book: 1228 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 194

Other Formats: mbr docx txt lit





Hitler and Stalin book.

Hitler and Stalin book. I used to teach Alan Bullock's "Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives" in courses about totalitarianism. Contrary to many other college textbooks, which tend to date rather quickly, this history book seems timeless. Bullock offers a monumental social biography of two of the most evil dictators in human history as well as an epic sketch of an era. Although the author specializes in Hitler, his grasp of Stalin is equally impressive.

saveSave Allan Bullock - Hitler & Stalin - Parallel Lives For Later.

saveSave Allan Bullock - Hitler & Stalin - Parallel Lives For Later. Allan Bullock - Hitler & Stalin - Parallel Lives. Uploaded by. Onur Kizilsafak.

Alan Bullock was knighted in 1972, becoming Sir Alan Bullock and in 1976 was .

Alan Bullock was knighted in 1972, becoming Sir Alan Bullock and in 1976 was made a life peer as Baron Bullock, of Leafield in the County of Oxfordshire. He is best known for his book Hitler: A Study in Tyranny (1952) which was the first comprehensive biography of Adolf Hitler and influenced many other major biographies of Hitler. Bullock died in 2004.

Hitler and Stalin never met but this book interweaves their lives chronologically. It sounds like a recipe for confusion, irritation and indigestion. In fact, it works brilliantly. the book is a triumph of organisation, lucidity and perspective. JOHN CAMBELL, 'The Times'.

Stalin was born in Gori, a rural village in Georgia, in 1879, and Hitler in Braunau on the river Inn ten years later

Stalin was born in Gori, a rural village in Georgia, in 1879, and Hitler in Braunau on the river Inn ten years later. Both, too, were raised by doting mothers and were abused or neglected by delinquent fathers: the elder Stalin (Djugashvili) was a drunken shoemaker, the elder Hitler a petty bureaucrat who eventually abandoned his family.

Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives is a 1991 book by the historian Alan Bullock, in which the author puts Adolf Hitler in perspective with Joseph Stalin. Bullock analyses the inner doctrines that made victory and unparalleled terror possible. While theorizing the lives of Hitler and Stalin, he prompts the reader with importance of the German-Russian axis in the first half of the century. The title and structure of the book refer to the ancient Greek writer Plutarch and his Parallel Lives.

I used to teach Alan Bullock's "Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives" in courses about totalitarianism. Bullock also produced a major work in British history, The Life and Times of Ernest Bevin (1960-1983), a three-volume biography of the British transport-union leader and foreign secretary. Contrary to many other college textbooks, which tend to date rather quickly, this history book. His latest work, Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives (1992) compares the two great dictators at different stages of their lives.

Alan Bullock published the first exploration of the two lives in 1991, and this excellent documentary covers many of the issue raised in Bullock's work. Uploaded for educational purposes only. Any advertising that appears is beyond my control.

Forty years after his Hitler: A Study in Tyranny set a standard for scholarship of the Nazi era, Lord Alan Bullock gives readers a breathtakingly accomplished dual biography that places Adolf Hitler's origins, personality, career, and legacy alongside those of Joseph Stalin-his implacable antagonist and moral mirror image.

Neither Hitler nor Stalin, he believes, was mad. Both were entirely serious about their historic roles, the author says; skeptical about the motives of others, their cynicism stopped short of their own. But Hitler, at the end, was close to insanity; and Stalin had all the symptoms associated with. But Hitler, at the end, was close to insanity; and Stalin had all the symptoms associated with paranoia-chronic suspicion, self-absorption, jealousy, hypersensitivity, and megalomania

A dual biography told in the context of Berlin-Moscow relations tells how the two similar men temporarily took total command of the historical forces swirling around them. 50,000 first printing. 50,000 ad/promo. History Bk Club Main.
THE definitive account of Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia. This book is a serious read, over 1000 pages, I was assigned to read it in college and I had to buy it and read it a second time; this is the only book you need to read to become an expert at Totalitarianism. How the two clawed their way to absolute power; what they did with it, the sheer scale of atrocity boggles the mind. What I love about this book is it's scholarly; I can't stand preachy books about Hitler and Stalin. I dont need you to tell me someone is "evil", 'diabolical', just tell me what the fudge he did and stop preaching to me. The research is flawless, what struck me was the numbers of the catastrophe that was Soviet Collectivization of agriculture, besides the 6 million dead peasants; Bullock cites the dramatic halving of Soviet Livestock numbers. If Stalin is coming to get your sheep, and you're a poor peasant who ate meat once a month; you might as well eat lamb chops every day until they come and snatch whats left.
This book is so necessary because their fates are so tied up against each other, their inevitable brutal clash from 1941-45 is the main event of WW2. Taken alone, the Nazi-Soviet Eastern Front war is THE bloodiest war in human history...the fate of the world really was at stake.
A history teacher recommended this book to me, and initially I wasn't sure a dual biography, particularly one of this length, would work, but Professor Bullock brings it off masterfully as he weaves together the political careers of Hitler and Stalin. Of course it helped in weaving their careers together that: their dictatorships overlapped significantly, they each had ruthless control of parties that aspired to control every aspect of society, they each singled out "enemies" of the state/party for particularly horrific treatment ("racial" enemies for Hitler, class enemies, e.g., Kulaks, for Stalin), they each viewed the other's country as the ideological enemy, and then they engaged each other in the most terrible war (WW II's eastern front) in human history. And yet while enemies, they seemed to have a grudging admiration for each other. Stalin noted approvingly Hitler's bloody purge of the SA and political enemies in 1934 and followed with his own far more massive purges in 1936-1938; near the end of the war Hitler regretted he hadn't done to his generals what Stalin did to the Red Army officer corps in 1937. And yet they never met each other.

This book is for students of Soviet history, Nazi Germany, World War II, and 20th century European history and requires a substantial investment in time as the paperback version has 977 pages of densely-packed prose, but the investment is worth it. Bullock's prose is smooth, and his descriptions at times are haunting, but most important his historical judgement is sober and unerring, or so it would appear to me. Writing in 1991, he had the benefit of decades of previous research to sort out the controversies of WW II, but even at that time the Soviet archives were just being opened so he readily admits that some Stalinist issues and events have not completely been clarified.

Besides their similarities as ruthless dictators of totalitarian states with enormous resources under their control, Bullock shows how they exhibited pronounced differences as well. Hitler was a charismatic orator who was very effective in mass meetings while Stalin was an indifferent speaker who was essentially a bureaucrat but a very effective schemer; Hitler was more of a gambler who took great risks (e.g., his remilitarization of the Rhineland when the French Army was still stronger than his rearming Wehrmacht, his invasion of the Soviet Union before he had subdued Britain) while Stalin was more of a calculator and a shrewd evaluator of situations; Hitler, who considered himself an "artist", worked indifferent hours and disdained paperwork while Stalin worked long hours and involved himself in paperwork and details (on one day he and Molotov signed over 4,000 death warrants during the purges). They both were ideologues; Stalin really believed in the tenets of Lenin's Bolshevism (although he killed just about all of Lenin's comrades) and Hitler really believed in the benefits of a "racially purified" German nation. They were completely indifferent to human life. Both Hitler and Stalin ordered their armies, time and again, to defend positions to the last man. Almost unbelieveably, Hitler in his political testament during his last day in the Berlin bunker rued the "fact" that he had been too "kind" as Fuehrer of Germany while Stalin has been quoted as saying that "one death is a tragedy, a million deaths is a statistic". Bullock estimates in his final chapter that perhaps 50 million deaths can be attributed to Hitler and Stalin, so that while these monsters may or may not have been the most evil leaders in human history, their undivided command of two powerful countries combined with 20th century technology made their impact on human lives unparalleled.
I used to teach Alan Bullock's "Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives" in courses about totalitarianism. Contrary to many other college textbooks, which tend to date rather quickly, this history book seems timeless. Bullock offers a monumental social biography of two of the most evil dictators in human history as well as an epic sketch of an era. Although the author specializes in Hitler, his grasp of Stalin is equally impressive. It rivals, in fact, Robert Conquest's "The Great Terror" in its thoroughness and depth.

As the title suggests, Bullock alternates chapters on Hitler with those on Stalin. He reveals how each dictator relied on his powers of manipulation, deception and opportunism to rise to power and spread totalitarian regimes meant to wipe out the human spirit and large parts of humanity itself across the world. The book also explains how Hitler and Stalin initially operated within the systems which they later (mis)used for their own selfish and nefarious goals. Whatever their rhetoric and ideology, both sociopathic tyrants ultimately craved power for its own sake, at the expense of everyone else, even the causes (and allies) they initially claimed to support.

Bullock's "Hitler and Stalin: Parallel Lives" gives us a detailed, compelling and extremely informative portrait of the faces of evil. It is an indispensable book for all those who want to understand how totalitarian regimes function and the role sociopathic dictators play in changing the course of history. As luck would have it, sociopaths are too self-serving and power-hungry to form lasting alliances. Had Hitler and Stalin not turned on each other, totalitarianism might have triumphed across the globe. As Winston Churchill famously stated in a speech after the German invasion of the Soviet Union: "If Hitler invaded Hell I would make at least a favorable reference to the devil in the House of Commons."

Claudia Moscovici, [...]