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Napoleon epub

by Paul Johnson


Napoleon epub

ISBN: 0786240008

ISBN13: 978-0786240005

Author: Paul Johnson

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Historical

Language: English

Publisher: Thorndike Pr (August 1, 2002)

Pages: 271 pages

ePUB book: 1900 kb

FB2 book: 1772 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 546

Other Formats: mbr lrf rtf doc





Napoleon/Paul Johnson. p. c. (A Penguin life). A Lipper/ Viking book. Includes bibliographical references. FEW INDIVIDUALS have had more impact on history than Napoleon Bonaparte

Napoleon/Paul Johnson. eISBN : 978-1-440-68448-7. 1. Napoleon I, Emperor of the French, 1769-1821. FEW INDIVIDUALS have had more impact on history than Napoleon Bonaparte. He is the grandest possible refutation of those determinists who hold that events are governed by forces, classes, economics, and geography rather than by the powerful wills of men and women. Though Bonaparte exercised power only for a decade and a half, his impact on the future lasted until nearly the end of the twentieth century, almost two hundred years after his death.

Paul Johnson’s many books, including A History of Christianity, A History of the Jews, Modern Times, Churchill, and Napoleon: A Penguin Life, have been hailed as masterpieces of historical analysis. He is a regular columnist for Forbes and The Spectator, and his work has also appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and many others publications.

Napoleon: A Penguin Life . This small book by Paul Johnson is part of the "Penguin Lives" series of short biographies of famous individuals of history written by comparatively famous authors (novelist Larry McMurtry on Crazy Horse and Southern humorist Roy Blount, Jr. on Robert E. Lee, for example).

Paul Johnson's many books, including A History of Christianity, A History of the Jews, Modern Times, Churchill, and Napoleon: A Penguin Life, have been hailed as masterpieces of historical analysis.

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. Postmodern Counternarratives: Irony and Audience in the Novels of Paul Auster, Don DeLillo, Charles Johnson, and Tim O'Brien (Literary Criticism and Cultural Theory).

Which brought me to Napoleon, Paul Johnson's contribution to the Penguin Lives series. The life of Napoleon Bonaparte in under 200 pages? Hmm.

Johnson Napoleon, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Jhonson Napoleon, is a father, serial entrepreneur, investor, a builder, and public speaker. CommunitySee All. 367,410 people like this. 412,702 people follow this.

Praise for Napoleon by Paul Johnson: Paul Johnson. is a historian at the top his game. The Atlantic Monthly This is a jewel of a book; comprehensive, brief, and passionate. His judgments are sure. His historical range is sweeping. His storytelling is crisp and his writing elegant. The Baltimore Sun The selection of the venerable British historian. Paul Johnson to write on Napoleon. has turned out to be a wise one: Johnson is succinct, critical, and deeply skeptical of the Napoleonic legend. The Economist Johnson provides an excellent overview.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Категория: Общественные науки прочие, Философия, Критическое мышление.

Book by Johnson, Paul
A very concise and thoughtful overview of the years in which Napoleon dominated Europe in so many ways. I have read a lot previously on this subject, but from mainly a military perspective. This books weaves the military in with the political and personal aspects of Napoleon (and also Josephine of course!) As Johnson summarizes at the end (which I largely agree with), Napoleon was basically an opportunist with an awesome military ability that even the Duke of Wellington stated was the greatest of all time!
But he never had an overarching philosophy that would unite his country and other parts of the Empire in the manner that the Roman Empire did.. In the end his tremendous ego and determination to conquer (in some way) the British Empire thru the Continental System was his downfall. He made great contributions to French society in the way of buildings, monuments, and the Napoleonic Code (For example, the code forbade privileges based on birth, allowed freedom of religion, and specified that government jobs should go to the most qualified), but in the end he ended up a lonely man on a tiny island far from any civilization, his home country and much of Europe thoroughly devastated by 20 years of constant warfare.
If you are looking for an introduction to Napoleon, this book serves nicely. Without much detail, Johnson provides most analysis and interruption. Johnson is able to present a unified Napoleon. Some authors succumb to the temptation of description Napoleon as two people - one responsible for his raise and one for his fail. As other reviews note, Johnson takes a fairly negative view of Napoleon. He didn't change, his circumstances did. He wasn't a gifted ruler and his fall was inevitable. His raise can be attributed to aggressiveness and lucky timing.

The explanation for some of Napeleon's success is technological. He was a master map reader. Napoleon's battle field strategy was predicated on three tactics: surprise, speed of attach, and point of attack from the rear. His aim throughout his career was to move swiftly to a position where he obliged the enemy to fight a major battle, destroy the enemy's forces, and then occupy his capital and dictate peace terms.

Napoleon was also a master propagandist. Napoleon either invented or benefited from the invention of the first modern nation state and the absolute concentration of authority. The army became the state. The modern nation state is capable of total warfare: economic, political, and combat. Napoleon's success was the catalyst that created a rival and ultimately more power nation state, Germany.

Quotes:

He is the grandest possible refutation of those determinists who hold that events are governed by forces, classes, economics, and geography rather than by the powerful wills of men and women.
He needed not a paymaster, like a mercenary, not a disembodied ideal, like a patriot, but a source of power, so that he could capture it and obtain more power.
The object of power, in is view,was not only to crush opposition to his will, but more usually to inspire fear, so that power did not need to be used at all.
The whole Napoleonic empire was an emergency entity, built to blaze but not to last.
A huge unbridgeable chasm yawned between his person and the next man down the chain of command.
Another fine book by Paul Johnson. He answers many of my questions about Europe and its nature following the fall of the Roman empire. What about the Germanic tribes? What about Prussia? Whatever happened to the French revolution? I probably didn’t pay attention in world history, or maybe they just didn’t teach me anything worth remembering. This book has been an outstanding adjunct to my knowledge and understanding of western Europe after the Middle Ages. No wonder my ancestors fled Germany and England in the 1800s!
Perspective rises above other portrayals to illuminate the effective propaganda aggrandizing Napoleon “The Man on Horseback” seeded the rise of 20th century fascist and socialist statism
As Modern Times, the author abuses of his knowledge of future. He atributes to Napoleón responsabilities out of his time. The description of the environment that produced the Emperor is probably the best analyze of the play. A big mistake It's the confussion between Louis and Lucien. Also, It's important the role played by Talleyrand, Fouché and Denian. The reading is easy and very interesting and, at the end, It's a good prologue to «Modern Times»
Interesting not entirely chronological narrative...good balance of personal anecdotes and tying together the overarching themes. A bit heavy on the military history details for me, but well written for fans of that part of things.
This brief biography of Napoleon biggest issue is that it is just that, brief. Instead of deviling into the intracacies of Napoleon's battles, rise to power, and rule, Johnson simply reiterates information that would be readily found on the Emperor's Wikipedia page. As much is dedicated to whole companions as is to Napoleon's seating chart for his wedding. While Johnson appreciates the greatness of the man, and writes compelling prose, he fails to capture any detail. A man like Napoleon deserves a bigger biography, I recommend the potential reader find a more complete work.