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Expecting Adam: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic epub

by Martha Beck


Expecting Adam: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic epub

ISBN: 0307719642

ISBN13: 978-0307719645

Author: Martha Beck

Category: Memoris

Subcategory: Arts & Literature

Language: English

Publisher: Harmony; Reprint edition (August 2, 2011)

Pages: 368 pages

ePUB book: 1680 kb

FB2 book: 1405 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 269

Other Formats: docx mbr azw lrf





Beck's other books include the New York Times bestseller Finding Your Own North Star, Leaving the Saints, The Four Day Win, The Joy Diet, and Steering by Starlight.

author of Second Sight. Set half in Harvard and half in heaven, Expecting Adam is a tough-minded yet tender-hearted book of spiritual discovery-a rueful, riveting, piercingly funny, thoroughly modern and deeply old-fashioned memoir. Beck's other books include the New York Times bestseller Finding Your Own North Star, Leaving the Saints, The Four Day Win, The Joy Diet, and Steering by Starlight. Dr. Beck lives in Phoenix, Arizona, with her family.

Expecting Adam is a poignant, challenging, and achingly funny chronicle of the extraordinary nine months of Martha's pregnancy

Expecting Adam is a poignant, challenging, and achingly funny chronicle of the extraordinary nine months of Martha's pregnancy. By the time Adam was born, Martha and John were propelled into a world in which they were forced to redefine everything of value to them, put all their faith in miracles, and trust that they could fly without a net. And it worked.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Expecting Adam: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Expecting Adam: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

is a life coach and monthly columnist for "O: The Oprah Magazine". She is the author of the bestsellers "Finding Your Own North Star: Claiming the Life You Were Meant to Live" and the memoir "Expecting Adam". She lives in Phoenix, Arizona. Expecting Adam: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic. عاد طباعته, معاد إصداره.

A wonderful book, funny unbelievably tender, and smart. Anne LamottIncludes an all-new afterword about Adam. Further graduate studies, budding careers, and a growing family meant major stress - not that they’d have admitted it to anyone (or themselves). As the pregnancy progressed, Martha battled constant nausea and dehydration.

The story of Diana, Herself helps every reader chart a course for awakening to greater joy, adventure, and purpose. Finding Your Own North Star. Claiming the life you were meant to live.

Beck, Martha Nibley, 1962-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio). Gutierres on September 30, 2010.

Expecting Adam: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth and Everyday Magic is Beck's story about her decision to give birth to and raise Adam. In 1990, soon after the birth of her third child, Beck, as a part-time faculty member at Brigham Young University (BYU) in Provo, Utah, taught a course on the sociology of gender in the Department of Social Science. During her time as part-time faculty member at BYU, five faculty members were excommunicated from the LDS Church as a consequence of public writings that were deemed critical of the church; the group became known as the September Six.

Expecting Adam is the story of letting go to perfection; the releasing of ambitions . I went into this book with great expectations The subtitle of this memoir is: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic.

Expecting Adam is the story of letting go to perfection; the releasing of ambitions; the saying goodbye to lofty goals. and saying hello to an angel. I went into this book with great expectations. I was mesmerized at first by her writing style and pithy observations. The subtitle of this memoir is: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic. John and Martha Beck were both working on their P. s at Harvard when they conceived their second child.

“A wonderful book, funny unbelievably tender, and smart. It shimmers.”--Anne LamottIncludes an all-new afterword about Adam.    John and Martha Beck had two Harvard degrees apiece when they conceived their second child. Further graduate studies, budding careers, and a growing family meant major stress--not that they'd have admitted it to anyone (or themselves). As the pregnancy progressed, Martha battled constant nausea and dehydration. And when she learned her unborn son had Down syndrome, she battled nearly everyone over her decision to continue the pregnancy. She still cannot explain many of the things that happened to her while she was expecting Adam, but by the time he was born, Martha, as she puts it, "had to unlearn virtually everything Harvard taught [her] about what is precious and what is garbage."

I loved this book insanely.

It's about transforming from a person-who-has-it-all-figured-out to a person who opens up to the miraculous.

"We will all be less hurt by opening--opening our hopes, our delights, our sorrows, our shattered and reborn dreams--than we will if we remain closed."

And here's why:

"Angels, or for that matter any forms of goodness, function like water; they run into any opening they are given."

I highly identified with over-valuing of intellect, planning and will-power...and then all of that changing in the face of life crisis. It is crisis that teaches us what really matters. It also opens doors to rooms we didn't even know existed.

As she began to trust herself to make a new life, "Some people told me I'd thrown my life away. They were right. But the life I threw away never fit me well... In the [new] life ... everything was transmuted into its opposite: grief turned out to be joy wearing a flimsy mask; danger turned into deep security; disability became genius; and death, the ultimate catastrophe, shimmered, shifted, and showed itself as just another sort of birth."
I almost didn't read it because I thought it would be depressing, but I love Beck's coaching books which are funny and down-to-earth. I'm SO glad I didn't let my preconceptions stop me. I started reading and couldn't put it down.

This book isn't about learning to cope with an imperfect life, nor is it some hippy-dippy rhapsody about flowers amid the ruins. Beck and her husband had mystical experiences (similar to ones I've had) that point to a much deeper order in life. I think the part I liked best was when (not to do a spoiler) a Presence says to him something like, "You just don't understand how it works."

I'm a little mystified by the reviews that say it's too much about Beck herself, since what she chose to write about is what she chose to write about. (The title is not "Adam", after all.) Nor do I find the tone "whiny"; it's humorous and somewhat self-mocking. (I get the impression that some of those who said this think that those who go to Harvard aren't allowed to claim to have problems.)

If you have even the slightest bent towards believing in a greater Life behind life, READ IT.
I love this book! From the moment I opened to it's first page until it's last it captured me and all still I wanted more . It touched the awareness in me of a love beyond all description, ever present and available. If ever someone opened themselves to allow themselves to be seen ,it's Martha Beck and I thank her immensely for the beautiful gift that that is. Her courage ,humor and insights make the reading of ever word a total pleasure. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants a look at the human heart with the eyes of the divine.
I was so moved by this book that I would like to give a copy to every person I love and care about. This book is about how truly misguided the idea of "success" in our society has become. It is about choosing to make your life more meaningful and happy.
Although some reviewers refer to it as a spiritual book, it is a powerful sociological analysis of the deep-seated prejudices in our society against being "different" or "unusual". What could be more natural than a mother deciding to behave like one? Yet what is most astonishing in the story is the refusal of so many people to understand and support that decision.
I myself am a person who deeply believes in a woman's choice, and yet I remain amazed by those ignorant enough to insist that "choice" means believing in abortion-particularly with regard to disabled children. Martha Beck's "choice" was to give birth to her child. How many times have I thought to myself how lucky my husband and I were not to have known that our daughter would some day be labeled "disabled". I cannot imaging being deprived of her miraculous and deeply treasured self, simply because she has turned out to be different than our expectations. When women choose abortions, it has to do with their own lives, and needs, and resources. This book is about why that is such a wonderful way to help a child enter the world. Martha Beck made her choices understanding that she was choosing for herself, and not because the baby she was carrying met, exceeded or disappointed her own or others' expectations. She has a lesson to teach all of us-even the reader from Brooklyn so offended by the way the author uses Harvard in the book.
This story is the story of a couple, both of whom suffered from a belief that their "value" stemmed from their intelligence, their academic achievement, and their professional potential. At different points in their lives, both were forced up against the knowledge that they had been pursuing goals and lives entirely devoted to proving them worthy of being loved. These lives were called into serious question by the challenge of being faced with the birth of their second child, who would be born retarded. Although the author talks a lot about Harvard, it is not about trying to impress us with the meaning of her Harvard degrees.
For those readers who start out their lives already so wise and well-adjusted they can't imagine why kids who go to exclusive schools are sometimes so in awe of that achievement-which seems so egotistical-perhaps this book is not necessary. However, for those like the rest of us, who question the values around us, but still founder when daring to imagine things differently, the book is a godsend. Though it may come as a shock to many educationally and professionally successful people to hear that the reverse side of a high IQ is sometimes an enormous sense of self-doubt and a lack of feelings of self-worth, it is nonetheless very true. One has to be fairly driven to compete in much of today's academic and professional world-given the costs demanded as "ritual sacrifices" by the Gods of Success. And in order to ignore our natural tendencies to seek pleasure rather than pain, a certain amount of necessary approval from parents and teachers has to be made contingent on academic and professional achievement or else normal folk won't be willing to suffer the sacrifices. By allowing us to understand the Harvard environment, the author helps us to understand just how desperately she and her husband believed they had to be "successful" in that world in order to feel worthy of love.
Their lesson-part of the spiritual tale which is also a focus of the story-is that we all deserve to be loved-not for what we achieve but for who we are. This is not what they teach at Harvard-or any other academic institution of high repute, as far as I have observed. Lots of people will not need to hear that lesson-but every parent should, even if they already believe they know everything about parenting. Imagine a world in which all children were as wanted and as loved as Adam-it would be like heaven on earth.
This book is about trying to get back on track with what the most profound goals of our lives should be, and how to achieve them. Ironically, there is not as much information about having a disabled child, or about that child himself, as there is about the beauty in taking life as it comes. My mother used to say that every person wakes up every day and is forced to decide whether to see the donut or the hole. My mom always chose the donut. That was her greatest gift to me. My daughter has continued in that family tradition of giving. Reading this book, which made me weep and chuckle out loud all week on PATH trains and New York City subways--to the dismay of other passengers--, has given me a "refresher course" in why such help remains necessary. Too many people have lost touch with the real beauty in life or have lost the ability to notice simple beauty--it is a natural talent of children, and the gift that Adam brought to the Becks. Many people of course, have never had it. In a time of great "prosperity", books like this can help you to focus--or refocus--on what is most precious in our lives.