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The Alarming History of Medicine/Amusing Anecdotes from Hippocrates to Heart Transplants epub

by Richard Gordon


The Alarming History of Medicine/Amusing Anecdotes from Hippocrates to Heart Transplants epub

ISBN: 0312104111

ISBN13: 978-0312104115

Author: Richard Gordon

Category: Medical Books

Subcategory: History

Language: English

Publisher: St Martins Pr; 1st U.S. ed edition (January 1, 1994)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB book: 1439 kb

FB2 book: 1320 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 303

Other Formats: doc docx txt mobi





Delightfully witty and richly informative, The Alarming History of Medicine is a collection of anecdotes describing how the . Richard Gordon is a doctor who has written over forty books on or about medicine, including the famous Doctor in the House series. Dr. Gordon lives in London.

Delightfully witty and richly informative, The Alarming History of Medicine is a collection of anecdotes describing how the historical breakthroughs in medicine were really made. Using hilarious stories.

Delightfully witty and richly informative, The Alarming History of Medicine is a collection of anecdotes describing . Richard Gordon is the pen name used by Gordon Ostlere (born Gordon Stanley Ostlere on September 15, 1921), an English surgeon and anaesthetist. Using hilarious stories, based on actual facts, Richard Gordon shows that most of the monumental discoveries were originally accidents.

The aim of this collage of anecdotes from medical history is largely to entertain, though it is pointedly instructive in. .The stories he tells range from Hippocrates to the present with a heavy focus on the 18th and 19th centuries.

The aim of this collage of anecdotes from medical history is largely to entertain, though it is pointedly instructive in its focus on reasons for and results of medical mistakes, misapprehensions, and serendipitous breakthroughs. Gordon's dryly humorous skepticism and general irreverence is balanced by an obvious delight in the intellectual play that characterizes the history of science. The stories he tells range from Hippocrates to the present with a heavy focus on the 18th and 19th centuries

Bibliographic Citation. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1993. Medicine; Sociology of Health Care; Philosophy of the Health Professions

Bibliographic Citation. Medicine; Sociology of Health Care; Philosophy of the Health Professions; Collections. EthxWeb: Literature in Bioethics. Показать полную информацию.

Items related to The Alarming History of Medicine: Amusing Anecdotes. Gordon, Richard The Alarming History of Medicine: Amusing Anecdotes from Hippocrates to Heart Transplants. ISBN 13: 9780312167639. Gordon express no awe for those who practice medicine-he calls then & rum lot''-and he numbers at only 12 the & discoveries'' of the discipline: The history of medicine, he says, is & the substitution of ignorance by fallacies.

book by Richard Gordon. Delightfully witty and richly informative, "The Alarming History of Medicine" is a collection of anecdotes describing how the historical breakthroughs in medicine were really made.

The Alarming History of Medicine : Amusing Anecdotes from Hippocrates to Heart Transplants. An Alarming History of Famous and Difficult Patients: Amusing Medical Anecdotes from Typhoid Mary to FDR. Great Medical Mysteries. Great Medical Discoveries. The Bulldon and the Bear. 1984 London: House of Stratus.

Gordon loved to let his mind roam all around the discipline he had started from: in the 1990s, his Alarming History of Medicine contained amusing anecdotes from Hippocrates to heart transplants, and other Alarming Histories covered famous and difficult patients, and sex.

Born in London, Gordon studied at Selwyn College, Cambridge, and St Bartholomew’s hospital medical school in London

Ingram A compendium about the medical travails of famous people throughout history offers colorful anecdotes and intriguing observations about such difficult patients as Stalin, Napoleon, Adolf Hitler, and King Charles II. Richard Gordon.

Amusing Anecdotes from Hippocrates to Heart Transplants. Published September 15, 1997 by St. Martin's Griffin. The history of medicine is not the testament of idealistic seekers after health and life; no more than the history of man is more glorious than a catalogue of selfish and brutish unreason shot spasmodically with sanity.

Gathers the real stories behind discoveries in medicine and humorous anecdotes about early cures and procedures
Mr. Gordon wanders all around topics that would be interesting if the reader were able to follow his path. He makes frequent abbreviated references to topics that are difficult to follow.
This is a hard-to-read book.
Richard Gordon is a physician, a writer and a humorist. His history of medicine is, indeed, alarming. It was not so much what wasn't known that mattered, but what physicians thought they knew and did not. The book is light and quick paced. At times I wished Gordon had quit trying to be funny and had spent a little more time expounding on his massive knowledge of medicine and its history. I am not an expert in this field, but I did make an effort to check some of his facts...and he was right on target. The book is packed with medical trivia and funny gossip (sometimes horrible gossip) about its practitioners. Much of the information is astonishing if not alarming. The book lacks an index, which is infuriating and should be forbidden in these days of computers. It does have a few pages of references. In all I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, and I certainly learned a great deal of new and interesting facts, despite the author's obsession with the quick, witty phrase.
Richard Gordon is very witty. However, this book is poorly written and badly organized. There were also a lot of misspellings and other errors which should of been caught in editing. He wanders all over the place and assumes that you are familiar with the history of medicine. I am not, which is why I bought the book. Don't read this book unless you already know the history of medicine or you enjoy being frustrated.
This was an ok survey of the history of Medicine. I found that the author, (who is from great Britain), uses too many terms more familiar to other physicians. The average reader would probably not enjoy this book, as some of the language can get quite lofty, and encumbered by latin medical terms. If you want an easier read of the history of medicine this is not the book for you.
Some interesting information. Jumps around in his writing style within a topic but after you get used to it's not bad. Makes you wonder how anyone survived the early centuries.
Got exactly what we wanted.
This is a fascinating series of anecdotes that makes a strange kind of page turner. If you are interested in the history of medicine this is an interesting place to start before looking at Roy Porter's works.
Thumbs up to Gordon for taking the reader of a mesmeric stroll through the oft-unusual characters and events that shaped the history of modern medicine as we know it. My sentiment wasn't initially thus. Half way through the first chapter I slapped the price sticker back on the rear cover, prepared to return it to the bookstore. Luckily (for me), I'm always up for a challenge, and something deep inside urged me to press on. Ah, woe is me; I couldn't put this book down (and this is certainly a text I look forward to rereading!). Perhaps the biggest qualm that I have with this text (and the reason I referred to it as literally discombobulating) is that 30 pages (or 12% of the book) were out of order! After discovering that the "The Gold-headed Cane" wasn't a mere page and a half chapter, but a full 27-pages; I actually had to read backwards! Bad move St. Martin's Press. In short, this is a terrific text for ANYONE interested in learning more about the history of medicine. Gordon's tone is vivid and funny; the pace is fast; the language rich (if your vocabulary/verbal reasoning is slightly above average or below- be prepare to have a dictionary near by). The text also features a couple dozen resourceful illustrations. There are NO misspellings in this text, only differences in British and American Standard English usage (i.e. using an "s" instead of a "z"- organisation vs, organization). - Great book for the mature-minded, well-versed reader. Enjoy!