» » My Sister from the Black Lagoon : A Novel of My Life

My Sister from the Black Lagoon : A Novel of My Life epub

by Laurie Fox


My Sister from the Black Lagoon : A Novel of My Life epub

ISBN: 0684855380

ISBN13: 978-0684855387

Author: Laurie Fox

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: United States

Language: English

Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1st Scribner Paperback Fiction Ed edition (September 13, 1999)

Pages: 336 pages

ePUB book: 1776 kb

FB2 book: 1445 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 510

Other Formats: mbr mobi azw rtf





My sister was the officially crazy one, but really we were all nuts. So begins My Sister from the Black Lagoon, Laurie Fox's incandescent novel of growing up absurd

My sister was the officially crazy one, but really we were all nuts. So begins My Sister from the Black Lagoon, Laurie Fox's incandescent novel of growing up absurd. Lorna Person's tale is wrested from the shadows cast by her sister, Lonnie, whose rages command the full attention of her parents. Their San Fernando Valley household is off-key and out of kilter, a place where Lonnie sees evil in the morning toast and runs into the Burbank hills to join the animals that seem more like her kin.

Laurie Fox. Scribner paperback fiction. Published by Simon & Schuster

Laurie Fox. Published by Simon & Schuster. Also by Laurie Fox. Sexy Hieroglyphics: 3,335 Do-It-Yourself Haiku. Also, a knowing wink to Victoria Meyer, Elizabeth Hayes, Gypsy da Silva, Carol Catt, and Leslie Jones for their behind-the-scenes magic. Thanks, too, to Nan Hohenstein, who has proved to be an invaluable aide-de-camp.

Confusingly marketed as an autobiographical novel, My Sister from the Black Lagoon starts out promisingly as Laurie Fox/Lorna Person tells of growing up in 50s/60s Southern California with her crazy sister.

Confusingly marketed as an autobiographical novel, My Sister from the Black Lagoon starts out promisingly as Laurie Fox/Lorna Person tells of growing up in 50s/60s Southern California with her crazy sister Lonnie-who shouts colorful murder threats, fears toast with sharp edges, cares for a veritable menagerie of reptiles, and terrorizes babysitters, but has also, Lorna thinks, the sweetest

My sister was the officially crazy one, but really we were all nuts. Lorna, on the other hand, is an acutely sensitive girl who can't relate to Barbie.

Confusingly marketed as an "autobiographical novel", My Sister from the Black Lagoon starts out promisingly as Laurie Fox/Lorna Person tells of growing up in 50s/60s Southern California with her "crazy" sister Lonnie-who.

Confusingly marketed as an "autobiographical novel", My Sister from the Black Lagoon starts out promisingly as Laurie Fox/Lorna Person tells of growing up in 50s/60s Southern California with her "crazy" sister Lonnie-who shouts colorful murder threats, fears toast with sharp edges, cares for a veritable menagerie of reptiles, and terrorizes babysitters, but has also, Lorna thinks, the sweetest.

I was born into a mentally ill family. My sister was the officially crazy one, but really we were all nuts.

ALSO BY LAURIE FOX My Sister from the Black Lagoon Sexy Hieroglyphics SIMON I bore and raised a ravishing . This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are products of the.

ALSO BY LAURIE FOX My Sister from the Black Lagoon Sexy Hieroglyphics SIMON I bore and raised a ravishing daughter.

Books ship from the US and Ireland. Bookseller Inventory KMR0000564. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Through it all, Lorna remains true to herself. And though she doesn't always think much of the person she is, she emerges from childhood a strong, passionate, and compassionate figure, realizing that-despite all the pain and guilt of growing up with a mentally ill sister, a "sister from the black lagoon"-Lonnie represents the best and worst of her own life and identity.

I would love to recommend it. I finished this book in just one day . Is it a bad idea to read two different version (translations) of a novel? 10 answers. I finished this book in just one day :) Source(s): Vks · 1 decade ag. I am reading "Dragon Fly in Amber", the second book in a series of 6 books by Diana Gabaldon.

"I was born into a mentally ill family. My sister was the officially crazy one, but really we were all nuts." So begins My Sister from the Black Lagoon, Laurie Fox's incandescent novel of growing up absurd. Lorna Person's tale is wrested from the shadows cast by her sister, Lonnie, whose rages command the full attention of her parents. Their San Fernando Valley household is off-key and out of kilter, a place where Lonnie sees evil in the morning toast and runs into the Burbank hills to join the animals that seem more like her kin. Lorna, on the other hand, is an acutely sensitive girl who can't relate to Barbie. "Could Barbie feel sorrow? Could Barbie understand what it's like to be plump, lonely, Jewish?" My Sister from the Black Lagoon is a wisecracked bell jar, a heartbreaking study of sane and crazy. Laurie Fox's delightful voice is knowing yet wide-eyed, lyrical, and witty.
Even though the author stated early in her book that she hoped this was *her* story, the story lacked depth about the mentally ill sister and the author's relationship with her. Lorna/Laurie's relationship with her cat seemed, at times, to be more important to her than her dear, frustrated (and frustrating) sister.
Never did we learn what Lonnie's illness is, what was being done for her, how she was educated, what her prognois was, how she acted that was violent (other than the unusual toys and the interesting pets)- Lonnie clearly lacked depth. Why mention the sister in the title if the novel was to be entirely about Lorna?
Other reviewers have suggested that Lorna/Laurie is self-centered, but that is to be expected. This is a memoir of an actor/writer, after all. The point of a memoir is to focus on one's life- and a actor is supposed to present herself.
Lorna/Laurie had a typical, freak, suburban upbringing in the 60's. The major difference is that she had a lot of stress at home, without enough support for herself, for her mother, and for her father. Even Lonnie appeared to not be well-supported by her therapists. Hopefully, people who work with the mentally ill and their families have learned over the decades to support them as they have learned with other forms of more visible illness.
A better memoir to explore the flaky family and the ensuing sister entanglement is "The Liar's Club". Truly a wonderful read.
Lonnie is severely mentally ill. As a child she is afraid of toast, bread crusts and has an array of bizarre verbal expressions. A veteran of clinics and later, hospitals and psychotropic medicines, Lonnie appears to accept her mental condition from the start. Her oddities stand out in stark contrast to her younger sister.
Lonnie's sister narrates the story of their voyage into mental illness, one as the unwilling passenger and the other as the conductor, trying to make sense out of a bizarre existence.
Lonnie exhibits glaringly masculine behaviors from an early age. She sneers at her little sister, dismissing her as a "prissy pink princess" and has no use for dolls, dresses or anything even remotely approaching gender bias towards feminity. When she is hospitalized during her early puberty, she pretends to like dresses so she can convince her parents to have her released.
Never able to comfortably find her niche, Lonnie's verbalizations and behaviors grow alarmingly more bizarre. Her parents split up and her younger sister fights for her own independence. Lonnie seems to accept her mental condition, e.g., she says upon seeing her little sister enter high school, she admits that she, Lonnie, can't go to high school. She crops her hair, adopts glaringly masculine appearing behaviors and, at the close of the book, is living a lesbian lifestyle in a half way house.
Lonnie's sister provides the voice of reason, the voice of explanation and the voice of hope. She holds out hope for Lonnie by describing her originality and spark of creativity and humor. She sticks by Lonnie. During the turbulent 1960s, during which a good portion of this story takes place, she points out Lonnie's behavior is not too outlandish given the climate of their times.
This novel gives a gentle, humane look at how mental illness affects an entire family and not just the person unfortunate enough to have the condition.
Laurie Fox's amazing saga of an intelligent, lost little girl struggling to find her place in a world that for her is a crazy, at times scary, blazingly turbluent place, is a honest, loving, funny, and entertaining piece of literature.
We see the character of Lorna Person from a very young age up into her 20s and are given witness to the confusion of her life. Born into a family where the star is her full of rage sister Lonnie and to parents who at times have nothing left to give her, Lorna quickly finds a voice for herself in her arts: poetry and acting-all tools of her intensely active and creative imagination. Plagued with the guilt of being the 'sane' sister and desperate for some normalcy in her life-she uses her imagination to dream up new roles and perfect families, drawing endless 'perfect families' in her little book. You watch, as she grows up into a blossoming actress-watch for an entertaining "Wizard of Oz" section-and as she grows into a strong, self-reliant adult. You watch as she searches for herself, finally finding the peace she craves when her sister gives her the secrets to her universe.
Fox's prose is beautiful and poetical, but also startlingly real, interesting, gripping and quickly paced, it's hard not to become involved in Lorna's world and it's very hard to put this book down.
I also picked this novel up on a whim and am so glad that I did! I laughed, cried, and dreamed right along with Lorna and her crazy family and enjoyed every minute of it. I will definitely be looking for more from Laurie Fox.