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PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2011: The Best Stories of the Year (The O. Henry Prize Collection) epub

by Laura Furman


PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2011: The Best Stories of the Year (The O. Henry Prize Collection) epub

ISBN: 030747237X

ISBN13: 978-0307472373

Author: Laura Furman

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies

Language: English

Publisher: Anchor; 2011 ed. edition (April 19, 2011)

Pages: 432 pages

ePUB book: 1750 kb

FB2 book: 1233 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 169

Other Formats: lit docx doc lrf





Henry Prize Stories 2011 contains twenty unforgettable stories selected from hundreds of literary magazines. These stories were extraordinary, some of the best I've read anywhere.

Henry Prize Stories 2011 contains twenty unforgettable stories selected from hundreds of literary magazines. The rest of the collection was pretty mundane - it seems that if you are writing about an exotic locale (Africa, Malaysia, India) and your protagonists are homosexuals, then you had a fair chance of making it into this book.

Overall I found this a better collection than Best American Short Stories 2012

Henry Prize Stories since 2003, is the winner of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts for her fiction. The author of seven books, including her recent story collection The Mother Who Stayed, she taught writing for many years at the University of Texas at Austin. She lives in Central Texas. Overall I found this a better collection than Best American Short Stories 2012.

Henry Prize Stories 2011 book. Henry Prize Stories 2011 contains twenty unforgettable stories selected from hundreds of literary magazines. Henry Prize Stories 2011 contains twenty. A brief history of the pen/o. Many readers have come to love the short story through the simple characters, easy narrative voice and humor, and compelling plotting in the work of William Sydney Porter (1862-1910), best known as O. Henry.

Henry Prize Stories, and each year three writers distinguished for their . Henry Prize Stories remains to strengthen the art of the short story. Henry Prize Stories 2011 the mood is a savage fierceness, which seems apt at the moment.

Henry Prize Stories, and each year three writers distinguished for their fiction are asked to evaluate the entire collection and to write an appreciation of the story they most admire. These three writers read the twenty prize stories in manuscript form with no identification of author or publication. Many of the stories are laden with a convincing sense of doom and intimations of what civilization looks like minus the civilization.

Henry Prize Stories 2011 contains twenty unforgettable stories selected from hundreds of literary magazines

Henry Prize Stories 2011 contains twenty unforgettable stories selected from hundreds of literary magazines.

The O. Henry Award is an annual American award given to short stories of exceptional merit. The award is named after the American short-story writer O. Henry Prize Stories is an annual collection of the year's twenty best stories published in . and Canadian magazines, written in English. The award itself is called The O. Henry Award, not the O. Henry Prize, though until recently there were first, second and third prize winners; the collection is called The PEN/O.

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Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. I Love Him to Pieces. Henry Prize Stories 2011. The Best Stories of the Year. Part of The O. Henry Prize Collection. Apr 19, 2011 ISBN 9780307472373.

The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2011 contains twenty unforgettable stories selected from hundreds of literary magazines. The winning tales take place in such far-flung locales as Madagascar, Nantucket, a Midwestern meth lab, Antarctica, and a post-apocalyptic England, and feature a fascinating array of characters: aging jazzmen, avalanche researchers, a South African wild child, and a mute actor in silent films. Also included are essays from the eminent jurors on their favorite stories, observations from the winners on what inspired them, and an extensive resource list of magazines.  Your Fate Hurtles Down at YouJim Shepard Diary of an Interesting YearHelen Simpson MelindaJudy Doenges NightbloomingKenneth Calhoun The Restoration of the Villa Where Tibor Kálmán Once LivedTamas Dobozy IceLily Tuck How to Leave HialeahJennine Capó Crucet The JunctionDavid Means Pole, PoleSusan Minot Alamo PlazaBrad Watson The Black Square Chris Adrian Nothing of ConsequenceJane Delury The Rules Are the RulesAdam Foulds The Vanishing AmericanLeslie Parry CrossingMark Slouka Bed DeathLori Ostlund WindeyeBrian Evenson SunshineLynn Freed Never Come BackElizabeth Tallent Something You Can’t Live WithoutMatthew Neill Null For author interviews, photos, and more,  go to www.ohenryprizestories.com   A portion of the proceeds from this book will go to support the PEN Readers & Writers Literary Outreach Program. 

The Pen/O. Henry Prize Stories: The Best Stories of the Year 2011 edited by Laura Furman is one of a long series of annual best short stories books. To be included in the edition is very prestigious. The selections have all previously appeared in American or Canadian publications. Each of the three judges talks about their favorite stories, the authors are also given space to tell is a bit about what went into the writing of the story and there are concise author biographies. A number of the authors have an MA degree from The University of Iowa, America's leading literary fine arts academy.

Of the twenty stories in the collection, I liked six quite a bit and would be happy to read more of their work. Overall I found this a better collection than Best American Short Stories 2012. To give my bottom line on buying this, I would have to say it is for those very into short stories who want to follow the form, not for those lukewarm on short stories.

Here are my favorites, in random order.

1. "Diary of an Interesting Year" by Helen Simpson. OK perhaps the girl wanders through post apocalyptic landscape plot is not real original but it was an enjoyable read.

2. "How to Leave Hialeah" by Jeannie Capo Crucet. A well done coming of age story. I would read more of her work.

3. "Pole, Pole" by Susan Minot. An interesting set in Kenya short story.

4. "Bed Death" by Lora Ostlund. A very subtle story about two American women, lovers, who go to Malacca to teach.

5. "Sunshine" by Lynn Freed. Set either in Africa or India, this is a very powerful and disturbing story about a wealthy man who prays on young girls, often those who have been abandoned and become nearly feral. It is also about colonialism and the bitter consequences of third world poverty. I would read more of her work for sure.

6. "Something You Can't Live Without" by Mathew Neill Null. This story is set decades ago in the backwoods of West Virginia, one of the poorest parts of America. It centers on a traveling salesman and rural grotesques. At first I thought, "O brother, another University of Iowa grad trying to imitate Flannery O'Connor" (the author talks about the inevitability of this reaction in his end notes) however it ended up being my favorite story. Null pulls this very risky story off very well. It does scream out "Southern Gothic" but if you can do it this well, then go for it. I will seek out more of his work.

I am glad I read this collection. It is for short story fans only.
A characteristically strong collection with a wide range of fictional techniques and stylistic choices. It would be difficult to find a "workshop story" in this collection (even though one story, Capo Crucet's gem "How To Leave Hialeah," takes us inside an MFA workshop and many of the stories are written by writers who teach in writing programs, have come from writing programs or both). In her intro to the collection, Laura Furman describes these stories as containing "end-of-the world honesty" that often explores isolation, destruction and violence, and though Furman is right about the intensity of these stories and their ability to disrupt and engage, they might also simply be described as stories that lead us behind the velvet rope into hidden worlds.

Many of the stories travel in time or geography: Jim Shepherd takes us to 1939 Switzerland and a man who is researching avalanches; Tamas Dobozy gives us WWII Hungary; Lily Tuck takes us on an Antarctic cruise; Susan Minot shows us doomed affair in Kenya; Lori Ostlund gives us a couple teaching English in Malaysia; Jane Delury takes us to Madagascar and the complex love affair between a teacher and her student; Leslie Parry tells the story of a mute actor in a silent film; David Means follows Midwestern hobos; Matthew Neill Null goes back in time to follow a door-to-door salesmen in early West Virginia. Other stories leave the real world and slip into the fantastical--Chris Adrian describes a black square that you can go into but never return from, Lynn Freed's tells the fable of a man who systematically collects, trains and rapes children and the feral child who disables this system; Helen Simpson provides the haunting diary of a woman trying to survive the apocalypse. Some stories make the familiar new and strange: Elizabeth Tallent gives us a man trying to save his son from his bad choices in a dying mill town in California, Capo Crucet follows a young woman from Miami to academia in New England and the Midwest and her efforts to retain her identity in the process; Mark Slouka goes hiking in Washington State with a divorced man and his young son; Adam Foulds shows us a gay minister, his inattentive clubbing lover and his desire to be a parent; Judy Doenges takes us into the world of the meth trade; Kenneth Calhoun follows a young man who is smitten with the old men blues musicians who let him perform in their band.

And yet, in spite of the vividness with these worlds are revealed none of these stories are easy, confessional reads but stories that require slow reading and close attention to what is said and what is elided. Many stories play with reader expectations through language, time, and narrative distance--each story setting up its own rules for how it should be read. This collection is not just an enjoyable set of stories but an education in what the short story can do.

Anyone interested in short stories should be buying this collection (and Best American Short Stories, too) every year, just to give yourself an intelligently chosen sampler of what's going on out there. And if, like me, you write fiction and hope to get it published, this becomes an even more essential purchase.
Finally got around to this and great great great, those all so finely-crafted moments when the weight of our human experience comes crashing down on the unsuspecting character. Was nice to see some speculative fiction: Diary of an Interesting Year is a chilling must read and The Black Square shows such expert handling of sci-fi as the story focuses on the characters and their response to the Square not the Square itself. Windeye was a short and powerful rendering of childhood fantasies, or not. Pole, Pole set in Kenya hit very close to home for me, as did Melinda about a woman living on a meth farm, Nightblooming took me back to them jazz old gs, and How to Leave Hialeah was just downright hilarious until it was suddenly touching. But the story that will always linger with me is Sunshine (Narrative seems to have a knack for such disturbingly moving stories) and A.M. Homes essay on the story was such a wonderful read. So devour them all and move on to the next collection.