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The Piano Tuner: Stories (Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction Ser.) epub

by Peter Meinke


The Piano Tuner: Stories (Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction Ser.) epub

ISBN: 0820308447

ISBN13: 978-0820308449

Author: Peter Meinke

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies

Language: English

Publisher: University of Georgia Press; 1st edition (April 1, 1986)

Pages: 168 pages

ePUB book: 1246 kb

FB2 book: 1909 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 466

Other Formats: mbr txt docx lit





The Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction is an annual prize awarded by the University of Georgia Press named in honor of the American short story writer and novelist Flannery O'Connor.

The Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction is an annual prize awarded by the University of Georgia Press named in honor of the American short story writer and novelist Flannery O'Connor.

Other author's books: The Complete Stories. The Complete Short Stories. A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Other Stories. Everything That Rises Must Converge: Stories. The Violent Bear It Away: A Novel.

In The Piano Tuner, Peter Meinke writes of theforeignness that awaits us when we go abroad and when we answer ourown front . Series: The Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction.

In The Piano Tuner, Peter Meinke writes of theforeignness that awaits us when we go abroad and when we answer ourown front door to admit a stranger, that confro. Published by: University of Georgia Press.

Her forward expression was steady and driving like the advance of a heavy truck. Her eyes never swerved to left or right but turned as the story turned as if they followed a yellow line down the center of it. She seldom used the other expression because it was not often necessary for her to retract a statement, but when she did, her face came to a complete stop, there was an almost imperceptible movement of her black eyes, during which they seemed to be receding, and then the observer would see.

In The Piano Tuner, Peter Meinke writes of the foreignness that awaits us. .Riveting, almost terrifying, the stories in The Piano Tuner tell of decent men and women caught in events that they could never have.

In The Piano Tuner, Peter Meinke writes of the foreignness that awaits us when we go abroad and when we answer our own front door to admit a stranger. Riveting, almost terrifying, the stories in The Piano Tuner tell of decent men and women caught in events that they could never have predicted, would never have chosen.

In The Piano Tuner, Peter Meinke writes of the foreignness that awaits us when we go.Flannery O'Connor Award for short fiction. 60 books - 10 voters.

In The Piano Tuner, Peter Meinke writes of the foreignness that awaits us when we go abroad and when we answer our own front door to admit a stranger, that confronts us in unfamiliar cities and villages and in the equally disquieting surroundings of our memories and regrets. Often in these stories, what seems a safe, comfortable environment turns suddenly threatening.

1986 Peter Meinke for The Piano Tuner. 1985 Daniel Curley Living with Snakes. 1985 Molly Giles for Rough Translations.

The Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction is an annual prize awarded by the Flannery O'Connor. It is awarded annually to two winners for a collection of short stories or novellas  . 1986 Peter Meinke for The Piano Tuner.

Flannery O’Connor was a master of the short story. O’Connors excellent essay on writing short stories can be read here. Admittedly, her stories are not for everyone, but if you like her work, even the longest ones are well worth reading. There’s a short teaser for each story. The Complete Stories Flannery O’Connor. If you love O’Connor’s stories and want to read them at your leisure, this is probably the collection for you. This volume contains all of her short stories, from her genesis as a writer thru her prime as a short story master. There are 31 stories and the collection is 550 pages.

In The Piano Tuner, Peter Meinke writes of the foreignness that awaits us when we go abroad and when we answer our own front door to admit a stranger, that confronts us in unfamiliar cities and villages and in the equally disquieting surroundings of our memories and regrets.

Often in these stories, what seems a safe, comfortable environment turns suddenly threatening. In the title story, a writer's quiet existence amid his antiques and books is dismantled, piece by piece, by a demonic, beer-bellied piano tuner. In "The Ponoes," a man recalls how, as a young boy living in Brooklyn during World War II, he became a collaborationist in the brutal pranks of two Irish bullies. In "The Twisted River," the sedate collegiality of a Polish university is disrupted when an American on a Fulbright grant attempts to blackmail two faculty members. And in "The Bracelet," a young anthropology student doing field work in Africa finds herself drawn further and further into the role of a priestess of Oshun, into a life dictated by the configuration of cowry shells cast upon the floor.

Meinke writes of a world where our control over our lives seldom exists across a border, and often extends no further than our fingertips. Attempts to bridge two cultures, two lives are sometimes successful, as when an actor finds love in the arms of a tough-talking barmaid, but more usually lead to disillusionment, as when a hard-drinking salesman's career is shattered after he is drunk under the table one night by a Polish engineer, or when an English father struggles to find common ground with his American son. Riveting, almost terrifying, the stories in The Piano Tuner tell of decent men and women caught in events that they could never have predicted, would never have chosen.

Short story collection that are quick reads. I only made it 1/2 way through the book. At the end of each story I kept thinking the next one would be better...but it wasn't. It felt as though the time spent reading was wasted and time I couldn't get back. That is extremely rare since I can find value in anything.
"In The Piano Tuner, Peter Meinke writes of the foreignness that awaits us when we go abroad and when we answer our own front door to admit a stranger, that confronts us in unfamiliar cities and villages and in the equally disquieting surroundings of our memories and regrets.

Often in these stories, what seems a safe, comfortable environment turns suddenly threatening. In the title story, a writer's quiet existence amid his antiques and books is dismantled, piece by piece, by a demonic, beer-bellied piano tuner. In "The Ponoes," a man recalls how, as a young boy living in Brooklyn during World War II, he became a collaborationist in the brutal pranks of two Irish bullies. In "The Twisted River," the sedate collegiality of a Polish university is disrupted when an American on a Fulbright grant attempts to blackmail two faculty members. And in "The Bracelet," a young anthropology student doing field work in Africa finds herself drawn further and further into the role of a priestess of Oshun, into a life dictated by the configuration of cowry shells cast upon the floor.

Meinke writes of a world where our control over our lives seldom exists across a border, and often extends no further than our fingertips. Attempts to bridge two cultures, two lives are sometimes successful, as when an actor finds love in the arms of a tough-talking barmaid, but more usually lead to disillusionment, as when a hard-drinking salesman's career is shattered after he is drunk under the table one night by a Polish engineer, or when an English father struggles to find common ground with his American son. Riveting, almost terrifying, the stories in The Piano Tuner tell of decent men and women caught in events that they could never have predicted, would never have chosen." UGA PRess
Half of the stories are great. The rest are OK.