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Do Not Deny Me: Stories epub

by Jean Thompson


Do Not Deny Me: Stories epub

ISBN: 1416595635

ISBN13: 978-1416595632

Author: Jean Thompson

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies

Language: English

Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Original edition (June 9, 2009)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB book: 1635 kb

FB2 book: 1371 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 879

Other Formats: mobi lrf rtf docx





Do Not Deny Me: Stories. San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year. The collection is also in its sixth printing, as Thompson’s longstanding critical acclaim crosses over into a popular following.

Do Not Deny Me: Stories. Do Not Deny Me is perfectly positioned to gain an even wider audience. Do Not Deny Me: Here is a title that demands-and commands-attention in and of itself.

As in her earlier collection Who Do You Love, a finalist for the National Book Award, Thompson populates her fiction with characters who, on the surface, could hardly be more ordinary, more like the folks down the block

I didn't know Jean Thompson's short fiction until I began reading this new volume of a dozen stories . I have read Jean Thompson's short stories in other books and did not enjoy them as much as DO NOT DENY ME. Her characterizations are intuitive and identifiable.

I didn't know Jean Thompson's short fiction until I began reading this new volume of a dozen stories - and didn't stop.

Автор: Thompson Jean Название: Do Not Deny Me: Stories Издательство: Simon & Schuster . Jean Thompson-author of the National Book Award finalist Who Do You Love and the New York Times bestseller The Year We Left Home-is a writer at the height of her powers.

Jean Thompson-author of the National Book Award finalist Who Do You Love and the New York Times bestseller The Year We Left Home-is a writer at the height of her powers.

Электронная книга "The Year We Left Home: A Novel", Jean Thompson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Year We Left Home: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

When Jean Thompson—“America’s Alice Munro” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review)—is telling stories, “You cannot put the book down” (The Seattle Times), and her superlative new collection, Do Not Deny Me, is one to be savored, word by word. • Award-winning storyteller gaining popularity: Jean Thompson’s short fiction has been honored by the National endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation; Who Do You Love: Stories was a National Book Award finalist for fiction and was promoted by David Sedaris during his own lecture tour; and Throw Like a Girl: Stories was a New York Times Notable Book and a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of the Year. The collection is also in its sixth printing, as Thompson’s longstanding critical acclaim crosses over into a popular following. Do Not Deny Me is perfectly positioned to gain an even wider audience. • Do Not Deny Me: Here is a title that demands—and commands—attention in and of itself. Yet Thompson’s latest collection is no literary dare, delivering as it does twelve dazzling new stories that together offer, with wit, humor, and razor-sharp perception, a fictional primer on how Americans live day to day. In Thompson’s writing, The New York Times Book Review has noted, “some of the biggest satisfactions happen line by line, thanks to Thompson’s effortless ability to tip her prose into the universal.” Thompson succeeds as “one of our most astute diagnosticians of contemporary experience” (The Boston Globe).
Like O. Henry, who ended many of his most famous stories with a melodramatic revelation, Thompson tends to cap each of hers with a psychological one. The blueprint is established in the opening story, "Soldiers of Spiritos," which begins as an academic satire of sorts. Penrose is a professor out of touch with the latest in culture and theory who writes a scathing sci-fi parody of his colleagues; his own emotional revelation arrives during a conference with a student who is underperforming in his class. In his office, reading aloud passages from an O'Neill play, they share their breakthrough moment: "It was the most beautiful, awful thing. An ember flaring up as they breathed on it. Old sorrow made new again."

Each of the book's twelve stories follows a similar arc: dissatisfaction with the state of affairs, followed by a series of everyday trials or soul-crushing routines, culminating in a confrontation or revelation that leads to "an ember flaring up" or an "old sorrow made new again." If Thompson were not such an incisive and often witty writer, a few of the stories would seem formulaic and manipulative in their adherence to this pattern. (Although Thompson describes quotidian incidents in such a way that makes them recognizable to most anyone, there's one thing that can be said about her stories: she never portrays the same character twice.) Of the stories that stick most closely to this mold, my favorite is "Treehouse," a story awesome in its simplicity, about a man who deals with the usual midlife crisis by building a hideaway for himself in the backyard.

There are two other stories that stand out, because the menace that pervades each of them doesn't lend itself to eye-opening transformations. In "Little Brown Bird," an older woman spies on her new neighbors and ultimately takes an interest in one of their little girls. When she mentions to her husband that the children seem to be unwatched, her husband quips, "Sounds as if you're doing a pretty good job of supervising them." Her adopted role as a busybody leads to a disturbing discovery, but in this case, rather than bringing about a revolution of the psyche, the woman is confronted by the vague remorse caused by her own powerlessness.

And, finally, "Escape" seems to be most everyone's favorite--for good reason. Confined to a wheelchair and largely incapacitated, Hurley is a prisoner to a range of merciless, routine abuses from his wife, who begrudges every moment she has to take care of him. He plots a means of escape, and the darkly comic turn of events really does result in the type of melodramatic twist her other stories avoid.
I have read Jean Thompson's short stories in other books and did not enjoy them as much as DO NOT DENY ME.

Her characterizations are intuitive and identifiable. The stories are easy to read yet offer some insight into the human person.
Just stories of regular people dealing with life, interesting, compassionate, and full of real life.I'll be looking for more of the same soon.
Why does Thompson get compared to Alice Munro, rather than to, say, William Trevor or Updike, to name two writers of equal caliber? I suppose it's the central place of women in her stories. To be honest I prefer Thompson's women to Munro's. Munro women are sensible and sensitive but always somewhat defeated and involved with vaguely unsatisfactory men or weak futile parents. Men don't come off much better in Thompson but Thompson's women have more chutzpah. They sometimes strike back and win the battle of the sexes. (The Canadians still do better at hockey.)
Finding a good writer of short stories is more rare than finding a gold nugget on the sidewalk while you're taking a walk. Jean Thompson is an excellent writer of the short story genre. There are several favorites that I have in this collection.

My all-time favorite is the first story, 'Soldiers of Spiritos'. Ms. Thompson takes on all the politically correct 'isms' that are currently in vogue in academia. The story is about a drama teacher who feels worn-out and out of place on the faculty. At the same time, he is busy writing a science fiction satire about his colleagues who look down on him and sometimes do not even acknowledge him. We see his sensitive side and that he really cares when he can get through to his students on some level.

Another wonderful story is 'Little Brown Bird'. A woman is working on a quilt and hidden among the appliques in plain sight is a little brown bird. The woman befriends a young girl from a troubled family next door and realizes that the girl's life is as visible as the little brown bird.

'Escape' is a story of two older folks who live to hate each other. Sadly, the husband has had a stroke so he is at a disadvantage in the 'let's see how I can get her back' category. They manage to torment each other and the story is sad to read but most of us know at least one couple like this.

On page 251, Ms. Thompson says. "I think you're destined for something wonderful. Not sainthood, exactly." . . ."But some other kind of shining, special life. No matter what things might look like now." Sadly,in each of her stories, nothing much better than the current unhappiness that each character is facing is likely to appear on the horizon. She uses the term "emotional pollution" on page 250. That is what we see in all of the stories - - sadness, anger, bitterness, despair, hopelessness and the repetition of those same mistakes that got each character to the miserable place that they find themselves in now.