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The Old Man and the Boy epub

by Robert Ruark


The Old Man and the Boy epub

ISBN: 080502669X

ISBN13: 978-0805026696

Author: Robert Ruark

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies

Language: English

Publisher: Holt Paperbacks; Reprint edition (August 15, 1993)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB book: 1616 kb

FB2 book: 1110 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 179

Other Formats: docx lrf doc mbr





His many books include The Old Man and the Boy, Poor No More, and The Old Man's Boy Grows Older. This book contains 29 quasi-biographical short stories about Ruark's youth in North Carolina during the Depression and Prohibition

His many books include The Old Man and the Boy, Poor No More, and The Old Man's Boy Grows Older. This book contains 29 quasi-biographical short stories about Ruark's youth in North Carolina during the Depression and Prohibition. These stories are about fishing and hunting and appreciating nature and, most importantly, learning life's lessons. The narrator (The Boy) describes his fishing and hunting adventures with his grandfather (The Old Man). The Old Man teaches the Boy how to shoot, how to safely handle a gun, how to maintain a boat, the habits of various types of fish and game, etc.

Robert Ruark (1915-1965) was an author and columnist Many of us treasure our fond memories of this time, realizing that we won't pass that way again, but not only does Ruark help you relive it, but in a far richer way that.

Robert Ruark (1915-1965) was an author and columnist. His many books include The Old Man and the Boy, Poor No More, and The Old Man's Boy Grows Older. Many of us treasure our fond memories of this time, realizing that we won't pass that way again, but not only does Ruark help you relive it, but in a far richer way that makes me think he was one of the the luckier boys that ever lived and at a time when distractions and complications weren't even a factor.

The Old Man's Boy Grows Older. This book came recommended from a friend. It's told by an adult recalling his childhood with his grandfather, and all the things the "old man" taught him about hunting, fishing, dogs, and life. Horn of the Hunter: The Story of an African Safari. The Old Man and the Boy & The Old Man's Boy Grows Older - 2 Books in One (Classics of American Sport Series). What's not to love? But I don't think the writer is a very good storyteller.

That Robert Ruark learned much from his experience as a big-game hunter in Africa, and that he truly appreciated the . In 1953, Ruark began writing a column for Field & Stream magazine entitled ''The Old Man and the Boy''.

That Robert Ruark learned much from his experience as a big-game hunter in Africa, and that he truly appreciated the relationship of the hunter to the hunted, as well as the need and the value of male mentoring. The older you get, the more you will appreciate his writings. Considered largely autobiographical (although technically fiction), this heartwarming series ran until late 1961. Ruark's first bestselling novel was published in 1955.

The old man’s boy grows older. The Old Man and the Boy dealt with a small local segment of the American scene, so it is rather strange and rather amusing that its components should have been produced in practically every corner of the world

The old man’s boy grows older. With Line Drawings by Walter Dower. The Old Man and the Boy dealt with a small local segment of the American scene, so it is rather strange and rather amusing that its components should have been produced in practically every corner of the world. The first two chapters were written on a steamer bound for Genoa; subsequent ones were recorded on an African safari.

North Carolina Outdoors journalist "Joe Guide, reads his rendition of Robert Ruark's first duck hunt as a young boy off the lower Cape Fear.

North Carolina Outdoors journalist "Joe Guide, reads his rendition of Robert Ruark's first duck hunt as a young boy off the lower Cape Fear

Born Robert Chester Ruark J. to Charlotte A. Ruark and Robert C. Ruark, a bookkeeper for a wholesale grocery, young .

Born Robert Chester Ruark J. Ruark, a bookkeeper for a wholesale grocery, young Ruark grew up in Wilmington, North Carolina. His brother, David, was adopted, and little is known about him. The Ruark family was deeply affected by the Depression, but still managed to send Robert to college. In 1953, Ruark began writing a series for Field & Stream magazine entitled The Old Man and the Boy. His many books include The Old Man and the Boy, Poor No More, and The Old Man's Boy Grow's Older.

This classic captures the endearing relationship between a man and his grandson as they fish and hunt the lakes and woods of North Carolina. All the while the Old Man acts as teacher and guide, passing on his wisdom and life experiences to the boy, who listens in rapt fascination.

This was one of the authors best among many others of credited attributes in literature. This set in the 1950 style era, a young man coming into young adulthood is mentored by his grandfather in the ways of woodlore, fishing, human nature, dogs and hunting, The learning of natures way as taught by grandfather to his grandson. These ways are all most non existent in this day and age. I myself growing up in that era was one of the most memorable of my life and will carry those to my grand children. Life long old timers etiquette and humor make this a classic. A grand read.
I'm 61 and I just learned about this book through my gun forum. I'm a big reader. Why have I not come across this book until now? Chock full of wisdom for a young man growing up in a setting that anybody can enjoy. The great outdoors. Many of us treasure our fond memories of this time, realizing that we won't pass that way again, but not only does Ruark help you relive it, but in a far richer way that makes me think he was one of the the luckier boys that ever lived and at a time when distractions and complications weren't even a factor. No wonder this book was so highly recommended by so many people.
Great book I have the hardcover edition as well & two of the soft covered editions. I just recently purchased a softcover edition to give to my grandson to read. I think the story has a life-message & should be read by every father and grandfather. I just love the story and the way it was told. I read it when I was very young, I'm now 83 years old and still remember, it I read it 3X. It's worth every penny. I highly recommend its purchase & I think it's a real treasure to own. I don't think I can sing it's praises any louder.
This comment is very respectfully & happily submitted, without reservation.
This book contains 29 quasi-biographical short stories about Ruark's youth in North Carolina during the Depression and Prohibition. These stories are about fishing and hunting and appreciating nature and, most importantly, learning life's lessons. The narrator (The Boy) describes his fishing and hunting adventures with his grandfather (The Old Man). The Old Man teaches the Boy how to shoot, how to safely handle a gun, how to maintain a boat, the habits of various types of fish and game, etc. At the same time, the Old Man is giving the boy many of the more important life's lessons about respect (for both oneself and others), the value of education, women, and a sense of responsibility. This is a great book. Each of the stories is relatively short (say 10 pages) and written with an easy prose. You could easily sit down and blow through this book in an afternoon, but after I read the first few stories, I wanted to savor every one and draw it out. As you're reading these stories, you'll smell the salt air of the ocean or the smoky aroma of game cooking over an open fire. Ruark may not satisfy the literary critics and write prose like Hemingway or Faulkner, but he is certainly one of America's greatest writers. I don't understand why he isn't more widely read, I only discovered his writing about a year ago myself. In any case, I can guarantee that you will ponder your own childhood as you read this book, and by the time you finish this book, you'll be thinking about what it is you really want to do with the rest of your life. I agree with one of the other reviewers, I would give this book 6 stars if I could. These are stories about hunting and fishing, but they are also stories about growing up and about life.
This is a wonderful book about the lessons of life learned by a boy from his grandfather. It was originally published as a series in Field and Stream and details Hunting and fishing scenarios that contribute towards making the man. Ruark was never as popular as Hemingway who also wrote about similiar issues. However, Ruark's sense of life and the excitement of a young boy as he experiences life's challanges and excitement make this book a well worth the investment.
I bought this book in the mid 50s - my late husband took Field & Stream magazine then (and I think it was F&S, too) where Robert Ruark was a featured writer. We both enjoyed Ruark's columns - even I who didn't hunt nor fish. But my late husband loved hunting/fishing/nature and the outdoors. I gave this to him for a birthday present in the 50s and later gave a copy to my Dad. I still have both those original books - hardbound with the dust covers.
Over the years, my late husband and I would buy copies to give to men friends recovering from surgeries or whatever. It was the perfect gift.
Since my husband's death, I've continued this practice - it's hard to find the right gift men but this one works beautifully. Several receipients have told me they've bought copies for their own sons/grandsons, too.
It's a glimpse back in time to a simpler, gentler life and one that seems now so far away. It's tender, funny, wise and sweet - I've enjoyed reading it again myself over the years and it's a classic as far as I'm concerned.
A great book, well written and so full of wonderful nostalgia, too. It's what I call a "feel good" read and in today's world, that is such a rarity.
I recommend it to everyone who loves the outdoors.
I wish I had a good explanation for not having read the book sooner, I thoroughly enjoyed reading a little every evening until I had finished the book. I enjoyed the vivid descriptions and eloquent prose used to describe what had to have been a fantastically enjoyable childhood, Ruark you were so lucky to have a Grandpa who loved you that much. It carries a message that spans generations and time, it should be required reading for every man/child/girl/boy/woman who even inkles about hunting. The ethics are so correct and hopefully will inspire a new generation to the honor which should accompany the hunt and harvest. How many times have you just looked and soaked up the experience, actually seen what was going on around and with you, appreciated all the small components that comprise a memory. I humblely thank you Mr. Robert Ruark for sharing the splendid times in your life, may you rest in peace.