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Penguin Modern Classics Lives of Girls and Women epub

by Jane Smiley,Alice Munro


Penguin Modern Classics Lives of Girls and Women epub

ISBN: 014305144X

ISBN13: 978-0143051442

Author: Jane Smiley,Alice Munro

Category: Literature and Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Canada (June 28, 2005)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB book: 1870 kb

FB2 book: 1709 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 792

Other Formats: rtf doc lrf mobi





Alice Munro grew up in Wingham, Ontario, and attended the University of Western Ontario

Alice Munro grew up in Wingham, Ontario, and attended the University of Western Ontario. She has published sixteen books - Dance of the Happy Shades; Lives of Girls and Women, Something I’ve Been Meaning to Tell You; Who Do You Think You Are?; The Moons of Jupiter; The Progress of Love; Friend of My Youth; Open Secrets; Selected Stories; The Love of a Good Woman; Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage; Runaway; The View from Castle Rock; Alice Munro’s Best, Too Much Happiness, and Dear Life.

As Del dreams of becoming famous, suffers embarrassment about her mother, endures the humiliation of her body’s insistent desires, and tries desperately to fall in love, she grapples with the crises that mark the passage to womanhood.

As Del dreams of becoming famous, suffers embarrassment about her mother, endures the humiliation of her body's insistent desires, and tries desperately to fall in love, she grapples with the crises that mark the passage to womanhood. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

In her only novel, Alice Munro turns her eye to the frustrations, embarrassments, glee and bewilderment of. .I still feel that Alice Munro is mine. For the latest books, recommendations, offers and more.

In her only novel, Alice Munro turns her eye to the frustrations, embarrassments, glee and bewilderment of adolescence, and to the brushes with sex, death, violence and birth that shape the lives of girls and women. I am the perfect audience for her brand of quiet, seething feminism' Lena Dunham. I am the perfect audience for her brand of quiet, seething feminism".

Penguin Modern Classics, Paperback, 256 pages. Author(s): Alice Munro. Published March 5th 2015 by Vintage Digital.

Alice Munro grew up in Wingham, Ontario, and attended the University of Western Ontario

Published by the Penguin Group. Changes and Ceremonies. Lives of Girls and Women. Epilogue: The Photographer.

Published by the Penguin Group. Penguin Group (Canada), 90 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 700, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4P 2Y3 (a division of Pearson Canada In. Penguin Group (USA) In. 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, . Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. Penguin Ireland, 25 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2, Ireland (a division of Penguin Books Ltd). We spent days along the Wawanash River, helping Uncle Benny fish.

Alice Munro grew up in Wingham, Ontario, and attended the University of Western Ontario. She has published thirteen collections of stories as well as a novel, Lives of Girls and Women, and two volumes of Selected Stories. During her distinguished career she has bee. ore about Alice Munro. Category: Women’s Fiction.

Jane Smiley is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "A Thousand Acres

Jane Smiley is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "A Thousand Acres. She invites us behind the scenes of novel-writing, sharing her own habits and spilling the secrets of her craft, and offering priceless advice to aspiring authors.

Lives of Girls and Women is the intensely readable, touching, and very funny story of Del Jordan, a young woman who journeys from the carelessness of childhood through an uneasy adolescence in search of love and sexual experience.

As Del dreams of becoming famous, suffers embarrassment about her mother, endures the humiliation of her body's insistent desires, and tries desperately to fall in love, she grapples with the crises that mark the passage to womanhood.

Alice Munro’s Lives of Girls and Women is the closest we get to a novel in her oeuvre. Her mainstay is her seemingly prosaic, but actually unsettling and jarring short stories; this collection is somewhere between the two.

Many of the chapters could stand alone as short stories, but indeed, the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. The title is true to the content: Munro follows the life cycle of her protagonist from girl to young woman. Along the way, her character Del Jordan observes the lives of other girls and women in her corner of rural Canada with a critical and discerning but eye.

Along the way are conflicts with boys and men. This culminates in the disturbing, but finely written ‘baptism’ chapter between Del and her boyfriend. Religion. Violence. Male domination. All there, a clearly written and apt charge against men. But Del is not trapped by this. The end hints at greater horizons for Del, far beyond her small hometown, beyond its narrow norms and customs, a town named, aptly, Jubilee – the biblical year of release.
Alice Munro is a very compelling voice in being able to speak the experience of women. Her heroine in this book is fascinating, the milieu of small town Canadian life is fascinating. The book ended rather abruptly, and left me wishing for more, but what are you going to do there? The author writes as the author writes and when they are done, that's it, however, I loved the book. She has just won a Nobel prize in literature.

Of her, Wikipedia says: "Alice Ann Munro (née Laidlaw; born 10 July 1931) is a Canadian author writing in English. Munro's work has been described as having revolutionized the architecture of short stories, especially in its tendency to move forward and backward in time.[2]

Munro's fiction is most often set in her native Huron County in southwestern Ontario.[3] Her stories explore human complexities in an uncomplicated prose style.[4] Munro's writing has established her as "one of our greatest contemporary writers of fiction," or, as Cynthia Ozick put it, "our Chekhov."[5] Awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature for her work as "master of the modern short story",[6] and the 2009 Man Booker International Prize for her lifetime body of work, she is also a three-time winner of Canada's Governor General's Award for fiction.[6][7][8]
Del, a young rural Canadian growing up in the 1940's grows up surrounded by friends, family and neighbors. She observes and describes her interactions with them and their interactions with each other in a way that connected with me in California in the 1990s and again with me and my students in the 2010s. It is a quietly exuberant celebration of everyday and every-man-and-woman.

Munro is known for her short stories, so a novel is something special, although each chapter can be read as a story in itself. I loved it and now I am reading it with my 11th and 12th grade students. After recommending it, I am gratified to find that some of my students are as awed, delighted, and disturbed by her keen observations as I am.
A lovely book, back and forth through time, it almost reads like many of her short stories woven together. If you've read "Family Furnishings",
or many of her short stories in the "New Yorker" and other publications, much of this book will feel familiar to you, if not redundant. If this is your first time to read Alice Munroe, I recommend this "fictional" biography. Even if you're well versed in Munroe, you'll want to have this book, as it's her one and only "novel."
Excellent writing in this novel by Alice Munro about the coming of age of a girl/woman in Ontario. She lives at first on a silver fox farm in the countryside but later moves with her mother to a nearby town. Her mother is an independent thinker who is trying to better herself and her family. While she is off selling encyclopedias to farmers, the daughter gets into various kinds of mischief. Very clear-eyed descriptions of what it is like to grow up in such an environment. I will be reading her collections of short stories next.
Read Alice Munro for the first time for an English seminar. She is utterly fantastic. I am so honored to have studied her work. This is the only novel she wrote, and definitely worth the read. I preferred her short stories to this, but it is a very well-crafted work.
I haven't read a book in a long time that left me feeling so connected to my fellow woman. How did she articulate impressions and vague memories so skillfully and accurately, finding the common thread that stitches us all?