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That Old Ace in the Hole: A Novel epub

by Annie Proulx


That Old Ace in the Hole: A Novel epub

ISBN: 0743240928

ISBN13: 978-0743240925

Author: Annie Proulx

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Literary

Language: English

Publisher: Scribner (December 24, 2002)

Pages: 560 pages

ePUB book: 1131 kb

FB2 book: 1909 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 177

Other Formats: azw rtf mbr lit





Annie Proulx is the author of eight books, including the novel The Shipping News and the story collection Close Range. Her many honors include a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award, the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, and a PEN/Faulkner award.

Home Annie Proulx That Old Ace in the Hole. This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. That old ace in the hole, . Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.

That Old Ace in the Hole is a 2002 novel by Annie Proulx. Bob Dollar was abandoned by his parents and was brought up by his eccentric uncle. Dollar is sent by his employer, the multinational "Global Pork Rind Corporation", to scout for locations for intensive hog farming in the Texas Panhandle.

The novel, Proulx's fourth, is told through the eyes of Bob Dollar, a young Denver .

The novel, Proulx's fourth, is told through the eyes of Bob Dollar, a young Denver man trying to make good in a bad world. Dollar is out of college but aimless, and he takes a job with Global Pork Rind - his task to locate big spreads of land in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles that can be purchased by the corporation and converted to hog farms. Robust, often bawdy, strikingly original and intimate, "That Old Ace in the Hole" tracks the vast waves of change that have shaped the American landscape and character over the past century - and in Bob Dollar, Proulx has created one of the most irresistible characters in contemporary fiction.

A brilliant novel from Pulitzer Prize-winning Annie Proulx, author of The Shipping News and Brokeback Mountain

A brilliant novel from Pulitzer Prize-winning Annie Proulx, author of The Shipping News and Brokeback Mountain. That Old Ace in the Hole is a richly textured story of one man's struggle to make good in the inhospitable ranch country of the Texas panhandle, told with razor-sharp wit and a masterly sense of place.

Annie Proulx at the 2018 . National Book Festival. 2000-WILLA Literary Award, Women Writing the West. Edna Ann Proulx (1935-08-22) August 22, 1935 (age 84) Norwich, Connecticut, United States.

Originally published: 2002. Bob Dollar is a young man from Denver trying to make good in a bad world. Out of college and aimless, Dollar takes a job with Global Pork Rind, scouting out big spreads of land that can be converted to hog farms. Soon he's holed up in a two-bit Texas town called Woolybucket, where he settles into LaVon Fronk's old bunkhouse for fifty dollars a month, helps out at Cy Frease's Old Dog Cafe, and learns the hard way how vigorously the old Texas ranch owners will hold on to their land, even when their children want no part of i. .

The brilliant novel from Pulitzer Prize winner Annie Proulx, author of THE SHIPPING NEWS. Proulx's own ace in the hole is her brilliance at evoking place and landscape. She sets about drawing the vast distances and parched flatlands of Texas with almost immeasurable skill. A richly textured story of one man's struggle to make good in the inhospitable ranch country of the Texas panhandle, told with razor wit and a masterly sense of place. Alex Clark, Guardian 'Amusing, intriguing and disturbing.

Proulx's own ace in the hole, though, is her brilliance at evoking place and landscape. With less of the darkness that marked out Postcards, Accordion Crimes or Heart Songs, That Old Ace in the Hole could be classed alongside The Shipping News as one of Proulx's entertainments. For those who enjoy the fine art of spinning a yarn, that might be no bad thing.

That Old Ace in the Hole is a richly textured story of one man's struggle to make good in the inhospitable ranch .

That Old Ace in the Hole is a richly textured story of one man's struggle to make good in the inhospitable ranch country of the Texas panhandle, told with razor-sharp wit and a masterly sense of place. From Annie Proulx-the Pulitzer Prize­ and National Book Award-­winning author of The Shipping News and Brokeback Mountain-comes an ecological masterwork, five years in the writing: an epic, dazzling, violent, magnificently dramatic novel about the taking down of the world's forests. In the late seventeenth century two penniless young Frenchmen, René Sel and Charles Duquet, arrive in New France.

In That Old Ace in the Hole, Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner Annie Proulx has written an exhilarating story brimming with language, history, landscape, music, and love. The novel, Proulx's fourth, is told through the eyes of Bob Dollar, a young Denver man trying to make good in a bad world. Dollar is out of college but aimless, and he takes a job with Global Pork Rind -- his task to locate big spreads of land in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles that can be purchased by the corporation and converted to hog farms. Dollar finds himself in a Texas town called Woolybucket, whose idiosyncratic inhabitants have ridden out all manner of seismic shifts in panhandle country. Dollar settles into LaVon Fronk's old bunkhouse for fifty dollars a month, helps out at Cy Frease's Old Dog Café, targets Ace and Tater Crouch's ranch for Global Pork, and learns the hard way how vigorously the old owners will hold on to their land, even though their children want no part of it. Robust, often bawdy, strikingly original and intimate, That Old Ace in the Hole tracks the vast waves of change that have shaped the American landscape and character over the past century -- and in Bob Dollar, Proulx has created one of the most irresistible characters in contemporary fiction.
Like the other Annie Proulx books I've read (The Shipping News and Postcards) the protagonist is forced by circumstance to leave home and travel to another land to reshape his life. However this novel doesn't have the strong plot driven narrative of the other two novels. While nominally about Bob Dollar's foray into the big pork business, the novel is really a description of the Texas panhandle and people who live there: "In his first weeks in Woolybucket Bob Dollar discovered that if the terrain was level and flat, the characters of the people were not, for eccentricities were valued and cultivated, as long as they were not too peculiar" ... "But dark skin color, strange accent or manifestations of homosexuality and blantant liberalism were unbearable." [p102]

I especially like Chapter 8, Pioneer Fronk, which is about one of the main characters ancestors who moved to the pan handle for health reasons. He has a difficult time getting to the town of Wollybucket and winds up on a horse with two names "You Son of a Bitch and Grasshopper." [p82]. The chapter was reminiscent of Larry McMurtry westerns where characters talk about all matter of mayhem and catastrophe with a droll matter of fact voice. Chapter 11, Tater Crouch, is another glorious chapter on the character, and characters, of the west. One of the characters talking about the wind on the panhandle describes the purpose for a hole in the door: "It's a crowbar hold. The wind gets blowin, you stick your crowbar out and let it set a minute, then pull it in. If it's bent, it's dangerous a venture forth." [p 135]

If you are looking for a plot driven novel which you can't put down because you have to find out who does what to whom next, you might want to pass on this. If, on the other hand, you are looking for a delightful character study of the hardy folk who settled the arid pan handle region, dive in.

What keeps me coming back to Annie Proulx' stories is her exquisite description of the world. Here are some examples.

"road alligators cast off from the big semi tires" [p 3]
"greasy hair that held the tradcks of his comb" [p17]
"He gave a crackling laugh like a dead bush in a drag, twigs snapping" [p 130]
"it was hot enough to loosen the bristles on a wild hog." [p 152]
"the sky turned the color of watermelon juice" [p 156]
"There were ticks of rain like insect wings against a lampshade." [p 182]
"the wet heat fell on them like a barber's towel" [p 211]
"road the color of grapefruit pith"[p 223]

If you are looking for a nice book on the people and features of the Texas pan handle, this is an excellent choice. If you are looking to read your first Annie Proulx novel, steer toward The Shipping News".
Hands-down one of my favorite authors! I truly find hard to stop reading her stories. Annie Proulx creates and connects some really compelling and complex characters, who inhabit places and occupations which she describes in a variety of passages -- lyrical, hilarious, dark, etc. -- whilst also illustrating the many ways human practices have had (and continue to have) deleterious effects on their environment and its inhabitants, in a way that is thought-provoking, yet not preachy.
annie proulx, for those who know her, is devastatingly sad. alarmingly so. nothing is ever easy, or sunny, or kind. it's alllll horrrrrrible eeeeeeek *tears falling copiously*

this is a whole new ball game. one of her friends said, annie, you are a brilliant writer, but you always write grim grim work. i bet....i just bet...it's because you CAN'T write anything light hearted or funny.

annie must have taken the challenge to heart, because this is book is a bright, shiny winner. funny, bright, loving and a joy to read. there a few downers, she just can't help herself, but all in all, this is wonderful. go for it.
I really enjoyed this book, although it lacks the pathos of the Shipping News, and Dollar is less developed as a character than Quoyle, although they share common traits. The reason may be that this book is more in line with Close Range, but in this one, the stories are not self contained, they are wound up by the main storyline, and you get to see the full development of the different characters and stories. In that sense it is magnificently crafted, like silver filigree, to give a more rounded vision of the panhandle, its history and its people. And there is a little bit of everyhting: joy, nostalgia, loss, fun....Tha caveat is that Dollar as a character is underdeveloped, it is more a means to the end of capturing the different stories, and the stories are a little bit disjointed.
I really like Annie's novels. They are much different that her collections of short stories which I also enjoy. You will learn much about the land and the people of West Texas. Her characters have complexity and texture. You can see, taste and smell her descriptions of the land, communities and weather. I consider this a must read for anyone who enjoys a really good story that you can step into and really soak up.
Annie Proulx produced a piece of literature worthy of the Nobel Prize. The writing was over the top great, the characters were drawn so realistically, the setting and everything about this book was masterful!
I could not connect with any character, much less like them nor understand what this very talented author's literary quest was in this novel than perhaps draw some strange and distant humor from this turnip of a story. Other works such as "Shipping News" and "Brokeback Mountain" are masterpieces. I look forward to reading her other works. We must allow our artists to fail in their exploration of artistic quests. I do love Annie Proulx.
Some authors seem to write unaffectedly. Annie Proulx has this knack. Her characters have some wildass names but they are wildass people. I am aware off that part of Texas and think she has knowledge of the kind of people that live there. Somewhat caricaturish in her portrayal but believable and lovable. She is a great writer and I gave her all 5 stars.