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How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe epub

by Charles Yu


How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe epub

ISBN: 1848876815

ISBN13: 978-1848876811

Author: Charles Yu

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Literary

Language: English

Publisher: Atlantic Books; Export ed edition (2010)

ePUB book: 1126 kb

FB2 book: 1870 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 857

Other Formats: docx rtf lrf lit





It also includes themes about life and how we live especially with respect to time, memories, and creation of the self. It was named the year's second best science fiction novel by the Center for the Study of Science Fiction at the University of Kansas -runner up for the annual Campbell Memorial Award.

Charles Yu is a time machine repairman in science fictional Minor Universe 31. He lives in his Recreational Time Travel . On the other hand, Universe 31 is a fictional, recreational universe where people choose to live, where the word fictional is of great import.

On the other hand, Universe 31 is a fictional, recreational universe where people choose to live, where the word fictional is of great import.

ALSO BY CHARLES YU Third Class Superhero This is a work of fiction. Original publication date in Minor Universe 31 is impossible to determine, due to the nature of residual objects within closed time-like structures

ALSO BY CHARLES YU Third Class Superhero This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents either are the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Original publication date in Minor Universe 31 is impossible to determine, due to the nature of residual objects within closed time-like structures. How to live safely in a science fictional universe: a novel, Charles Yu. p. cm. eISBN 978-0-307-37948-1 .

Essentially, it’s a science fictional universe where time travel is possible. Charles Yu is a time travel technician who has spent ten years living in his own time machine set in a stasis mode. Notice that the author’s name is also Charles Y. Fiction and reality have blended together so that you may run into Luke Skywalker’s son If anyone is ever crazy enough to make a movie version of this, they better hire Charlie Kaufman to do the adapted screenplay. Even he would probably be left scratching his head and saying, What the hell? Trying to summarize this is going to be like trying to explain Inception to someone who has never had a dream or seen a movie.

The science-fictional universe in question in this marvel of a novel is Minor Universe 31 (MU31). Q: Your book deals with time travel in a more serious and even tragic way than most stories about the subject, though you mask the severity with humor to keep the dialogue light and amusing. This is a universe you need to visit.

Every day in Minor Universe 31 people get into time machines and try to change the past. That’s where Charles Yu, time travel technician, steps in. He helps save people from themselves.

Электронная книга "How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe: A Novel", Charles Yu. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

He's spent the better part of a decade navel-gazing, spying on 39 different versions of himself in alternate universes . Now he's stuck in a time loop, going in circles forever

He's spent the better part of a decade navel-gazing, spying on 39 different versions of himself in alternate universes (and discovered that 35 of them are total jerks). And he's kind of fallen in love with TAMMY, which is bad because she doesn't have a module for that. With all that's on his mind, perhaps it's no surprise that when he meets his future self, he shoots him in the stomach. And that's a beginner's mistake for a time machine repairman. Now he's stuck in a time loop, going in circles forever

New York : Pantheon Books.

New York : Pantheon Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio). Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 16, 2012.

With only TAMMY - a slightly tearful computer with self-esteem issues - a software boss called Phil - Microsoft Middle Manager 3.0 - and an imaginary dog called Ed for company, fixing time machines is a lonely business and Charles Yu is stuck in a rut. He's spent the better part of a decade navel-gazing, spying on 39 different versions of himself in alternate universes (and discovered that 35 of them are total jerks). And he's kind of fallen in love with TAMMY, which is bad because she doesn't have a module for that. With all that's on his mind, perhaps it's no surprise that when he meets his future self, he shoots him in the stomach. And that's a beginner's mistake for a time machine repairman. Now he's stuck in a time loop, going in circles forever. All he has, wrapped in brown paper, is the book his future self was trying to press into his hands. It's called How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe. And he's the author. And somewhere inside it is the information that could save him.
I want to say I remember seeing this in the New Yorker when it first came out. I looked for it again when I read a newer release on theories of time travel that cited this book a lot. Pretty sure it was “Time Travel: A History” by James Gleick.

It’s not really a story. Well, it kind of is. The narrator having the same name as the author and it tells the story of his father inventing time travel and a kid looking up to his father. But if you’re in this for the plot, you might be let down a bit.

There is a blurb on the cover of my edition calling this a “A great Calvino-esque thrill ride of a book”. That really directed me how to read this book. It turns out that it is not science fiction. It science metafiction or metascience fiction. I’m not sure which one fits better. It’s a book about science fiction and time travel and paradoxes. It is an interesting text if you approach it in that sort of manner. I hated Invisible Cities, but loved If on a winter’s night a traveler, so I can image there are some mixed reactions here. In any manner, it is worth the read you just have to know to come at it obliquely.
I am a big fan of his and only read this book because he got such high reviews on a short story in The New Yorker Magazine. If you like "the Hitchhiker's Guide", Douglas Adams - you will like this. Very creative on several levels. Charles Yu is science fiction on steroids and possibly late night pizza. I usually read biography, business, and history books.
(Partly read in Kindle, partly heard in audiobook. This review reflects both.)

Story Flavor: Post-modern psycho-social technological sci-fi (think "Raw Shark Texts" has a baby with "Psychohistorical Crisis" that gets adopted and raised by "Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse").

Audio Narration Flavor: Ascerbic, all-knowing humor reminiscent of noir tough-guy, blended with the tentative consideration of a philosophy student.

...and, believe it or not, that was the perfect voice to narrate this book. Many kudos to the audiobook narrator, and the producer who seems to have carefully read the book before choosing him.

The story follows a main character through a bildungsroman event with the unlikely catalyst of getting stuck in a time loop. As is typical, the reader will not necessarily like the main character in the beginning, but will inevitably be pulling for him (partially facilitated by the fact that he is quite literally confronting his own mortality; partially facilitated by the considerable and constant self-referential/fourth-wall-eclipsing nature of the book that gives the distinct notion that the whole thing may not be the main character's fault and perhaps the author is a meta-villain) and the supporting characters around him (for having to deal with him). The flavor text of the book is rife with partially scientific theories and considerations of what disciplines would have to develop in a universe wherein time travel is common and a recreational commodity. It also dabbles in geography, literature, and a numerical view of sociology. Very interesting, and each tidbit discussed in just enough detail to leave the reader wanting more.

This is also one of the more sensible methods of handling the concept of a loop in time travel. Anyone who wants to explore the loop concept without getting dizzy should enjoy this book.

There is one character that was severely underdeveloped throughout the book, and that was Ed the dog. Do not expect the dog to be a source of humor or non-vocal comment for the storyline, as he serves more to demonstrate the nature of the world the author is telling.

Overall summary: Five out of five. Excellent read. One of the rare Post-moderns that gives the reader plenty to consider without regretting the reading and getting depressed.
A sharp book that upticks the level of writing and story to more literary proportions while still honoring the sci-if genre, which can be much more plot-oriented with poor writing than what Yu offers up. The story of a damaged man looking to undo mistakes, the classic situation and dilemma of a time travel story, as can one ever really change events or is one's life the result of a causality loop that can't change. Yu writes with humor and intelligence and some heartbreak, of course, as his protagonist looks to rediscover his family and put himself on a happier path.
I'm not exactly sure whether or not I liked this book.

Oh, I enjoyed it well enough, but I'm not sure I *liked* it.

Yu is obviously steeped in Star Trek and the sci-fi canon surrounding time travel, and he uses that knowledge to great effect. His main character - a version of himself - at times gets as confused as the reader does. It's all in good fun, though, and the story is filled with poignant vignettes about a young man trying to come to grips not only with himself, but with his past, parents and future.

The details are just right, but the pseudo-science (which Yu largely creates out of whole cloth) can become a little overwhelming at times. A greatly enjoyable read for the most part. I'll definitely be checking out some of his other work.
Not at all what I was expecting, but I loved it all the same. This was a different writing style that I was expecting, but it worked for the story. A good mix of humor, sci-fi, and philosophy.
Love this book. It's straightforward and full of classic science fiction tropes, but Yu's writing is engaging and at times, emotionally charging.