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Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain, 1750–1850 epub

by Devoney Looser


Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain, 1750–1850 epub

ISBN: 0801887054

ISBN13: 978-0801887055

Author: Devoney Looser

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (September 8, 2008)

Pages: 252 pages

ePUB book: 1951 kb

FB2 book: 1410 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 773

Other Formats: lrf mobi txt mbr





Looser focuses most of her pages solely on women writers but thoughtfully includes several brief examples of contemporary . As wonderful and thorough as her book is, Looser fails to provide a complete picture of women writers.

Looser focuses most of her pages solely on women writers but thoughtfully includes several brief examples of contemporary male novelists to provide a counterpoint in each chapter. If the argument can made that by focusing almost solely on women she provides a weak and curtailed history, Looser counters reasonably that we are in a better position to understand women if we separate the cases to investigate this uncharted terrain fully.

This essay, conceived as a response to Anne Mellor's Romanticism and Gender (1993), considers the author's Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain 1750–1850 (2008) in the context of contemporary scholarship on Romantic-era women's writings.

Though these remarkable women wrote and published well into old age, Looser sees in their .

Though these remarkable women wrote and published well into old age, Looser sees in their late careers the necessity of choosing among several different paths. In illuminating the powerful and often poorly recognized legacy of the British women writers who spurred a marketplace revolution in their earlier years only to find unanticipated barriers to acceptance in later life, Looser opens up new scholarly territory in the burgeoning field of feminist age studies.

Devoney Looser's 2008 study, Women Writers and Old Age in Great .

Devoney Looser's 2008 study, Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain, 1750-1850, will prove to be a landmark publication. Looser provides an in-depth survey of the lives of a selection of women writers from the time period, from well-known authors like Jane Austen to those who have become obscure, like Jane Porter.

She is the author of Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain, 1750–1850 and British Women Writers and the Writing of History 1670–1820. xvi. Notes on the Contributors

She is the author of Women Writers and Old Age in Great Britain, 1750–1850 and British Women Writers and the Writing of History 1670–1820. Notes on the Contributors. Olivia Murphy is a DPhil candidate at Worcester College, Oxford University, having previously completed an MPhil at Sydney University on Austen’s juvenilia

Though these remarkable women wrote and published well into old age, Looser sees in their late careers the necessity of choosing among several different paths. These included receding into the background as authors of "classics," adapting to grandmotherly standards of behavior, attempting to reshape masculinized conceptions of aged wisdom, or trying to create entirely new categories for older women writers

Though those awesome girls wrote and released good into outdated age, Looser sees of their .

Though those awesome girls wrote and released good into outdated age, Looser sees of their past due careers the need of selecting between numerous diverse paths. those incorporated receding into the heritage as authors of "classics," adapting to grandmotherly criteria of habit, trying to reshape masculinized conceptions of elderly knowledge, or attempting to create fullyyt new different types for older girls writers

Download PDF book format. English literature Women authors History and criticism Older women Great Britain Women and literature History 18th century History 19th century Old age Social aspects.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Women writers and old age in Great Britain, 1750-1850 Devoney Looser. Book's title: Women writers and old age in Great Britain, 1750-1850 Devoney Looser. Library of Congress Control Number: 2008000586. Download now Women writers and old age in Great Britain, 1750-1850 Devoney Looser. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

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Are you sure you want to remove Women writers and old age in Great Britain, 1750-1850 from your list? Women writers and old age in Great Britain, 1750-1850. Published 2008 by Johns Hopkins University Press in Baltimore. Includes bibliographical references and index.

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This groundbreaking study explores the later lives and late-life writings of more than two dozen British women authors active during the long eighteenth century.

Drawing on biographical materials, literary texts, and reception histories, Devoney Looser finds that far from fading into moribund old age, female literary greats such as Anna Letitia Barbauld, Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Catharine Macaulay, Hester Lynch Piozzi, and Jane Porter toiled for decades after they achieved acclaim―despite seemingly concerted attempts by literary gatekeepers to marginalize their later contributions.

Though these remarkable women wrote and published well into old age, Looser sees in their late careers the necessity of choosing among several different paths. These included receding into the background as authors of "classics," adapting to grandmotherly standards of behavior, attempting to reshape masculinized conceptions of aged wisdom, or trying to create entirely new categories for older women writers. In assessing how these writers affected and were affected by the culture in which they lived, and in examining their varied reactions to the prospect of aging, Looser constructs careful portraits of each of her subjects and explains why many turned toward retrospection in their later works.

In illuminating the powerful and often poorly recognized legacy of the British women writers who spurred a marketplace revolution in their earlier years only to find unanticipated barriers to acceptance in later life, Looser opens up new scholarly territory in the burgeoning field of feminist age studies.