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My Mark Twain: Reminiscences and Criticisms epub

by William Dean Howells,Marilyn Austin Baldwin


My Mark Twain: Reminiscences and Criticisms epub

ISBN: 0807101257

ISBN13: 978-0807101254

Author: William Dean Howells,Marilyn Austin Baldwin

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: LSU Press; New Ed edition (June 1, 1967)

Pages: 189 pages

ePUB book: 1647 kb

FB2 book: 1913 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 539

Other Formats: txt lrf mobi lit





William Dean Howells knew "Clemens" for a large part of their adult lives

William Dean Howells knew "Clemens" for a large part of their adult lives. He loved and admired him and saw him as a very good man. Written after Twain's death, it is both a happy remembrance and a sad goodbye by Howells to a treasured friend. One person found this helpful. This short book gives one very personal insight into Twain, his wife, as well as the author.

William Dean Howells, My Mark Twain: Reminiscences and Criticisms, ed. Marilyn Austin Baldwin, Louisiana State University Press, 1967, page 173, footnote 62. ISBN 0-8071-0125-7. Van Wyck Brooks, Howells: His Life and World, Dutton, 1959, page 128. Henry James, William Dean Howells, Letters, Fictions, Lives: Henry James and William Dean Howells, Oxford University Press, 1997, page 130, footnote 6. ISBN 0-19-506119-5.

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William Dean Howells; Marilyn Austin Baldwin; Marilyn Austin Baldwin. The long friendship between Howells and Mark Twain fostered innumerable visits, extensive correspondence, joint literary projects, and often humorous escapades. To a great degree Howells identified with Clemens. New. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. My Mark Twain : Reminiscences and Criticisms. Both men were of midwestern origin and came from similar backgrounds. They encountered literary Boston together. Both experienced domestic tragedy.

Part first : Memories : My Mark Twain - Part second : Criticism.

Howells, William Dean, 1837-1920; Roy J. Friedman Mark Twain Collection (Library of Congress) DLC. Publication date. Part first : Memories : My Mark Twain - Part second : Criticism. A biography of Mark Twain, followed by criticism of about a dozen of his major works.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. My Mark Twain; Reminiscences And Criticisms. Howells, William Dean, 1837-1920.

By William Dean Howells. The question of a final criterion for the appreciation of art is one thatperpetually recurs to those interested in any sort of aesthetic endeavor. John Addington Symonds, in a chapter of 'The Renaissance in Italy'treating of the Bolognese school of painting, which once had so greatcry, and was vaunted the supreme exemplar of the grand style, but whichhe now believes fallen. Possibly there is no absolutely ugly, no absolutelybeautiful; or possibly the ugly contains always an element of thebeautiful better adapted to the general appreciation than the moreperfectly beautiful.

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MY MARK TWAIN I It was in the little office of James T. Fields, over the book-store of Ticknor&Fields, at 124 . I wrote nearly all of them myself, and in 1869 I had written rather a long notice of a book just winning its way to universal favor. Fields, over the book-store of Ticknor&Fields, at 124 Tremont Street, Boston, that I first met my friend of now forty-four years, Samuel L. Clemens. I forget just what I said in praise of it, and it does not matter; it is enough that I praised it enough to satisfy the author.

For more than forty years William Dean Howells counted Mark Twain among his closest friends. Howells knew all the great men of American literature during the last half of the nineteenth century. In his acquaintance were Longfellow, Emerson, Lowell, Holmes, and a long list of other sages, poets, novelists, and critics.

“They were like on another and like other literary men,” Howells wrote, “but Clemens was sole, incomparable, the Lincoln of our literature.”

Mark Twin’s death on April 21, 1910, moved Howells to record his memories of the man he felt “pervaded” the era “almost more than any other man of letters.” His reminiscences were published in Harper’s Monthly and subsequently put into book form along with twelve pieces of Howells’ criticism of Mark Twain’s work.

This is the first new edition of the book since the original printing in 1910. Both the sketch and the essays have been annotated to give the reader a full appreciation of Mark Twain’s growth as a writer and Howells’ increasing awareness of his friends’ greatness. The notes identify and explain the literary issues, the people, places, and events to which Howells alludes.

The long friendship between Howells and Mark Twain fostered innumerable visits, extensive correspondence, joint literary projects, and often humorous escapades. To a great degree Howells identified with Clemens. Both men were of midwestern origin and came from similar backgrounds. They encountered literary Boston together. Both experienced domestic tragedy. The immediacy of My Mark Twain affords the reader a rare and intimate picture of Mark Twain and indirectly, of Howells.

Written in quaint 19th century prose, this is a wonderful read with a close view of Mark Twain as a friend and as a family man. William Dean Howells knew "Clemens" for a large part of their adult lives. He loved and admired him and saw him as a very good man. Written after Twain's death, it is both a happy remembrance and a sad goodbye by Howells to a treasured friend.
This short book gives one very personal insight into Twain, his wife, as well as the author. Howells obviously had more than a business interest in Twain's writing career; thet shared personal time and concerns with one another.
A delightful insight by a close friend giving us a better understanding of the wonder behind the mustache.
this is a must book for anyone really interested in mark twain... thank you for publishing it...
If you really want to know Mr. Clemens, don't stop with the modern biographies. Read this one by his long-time good friend and consultant. Howells wrote this book in 1910, the year Clemens died. It is a fond recollection of the 44 years he had known the author. Clemens was a complicated man and Howells admits that he did not always understand him. But Howells, a great writer himself, comes close to describing the multi-faceted person that Clemens was. Yes, he was Mark Twain, but that was just one part of a man who surely must be one of the most interesting Americans who ever stood in the spotlight of the world. He was a superstar before radio, TV, and movies. This is certainly not an unbiased account of his life. Howells was clearly in awe of Clemens, a man who was unlike himself in so many ways. He was fascinated by Clemens and drawn to him. How lucky we are that we have this insightful and personal biography, beautifully written by someone who obviously wanted to get it right. Howells put Clemens at the top of the list: "Emerson, Longfellow, Lowell, Holmes - I knew them all and all the rest of our sages, poets, seers, critics, humorists; they were like one another and like other literary men; but Clemens was sole, incomparable, the Lincoln of our literature."
My Mark Twain is a delightful study of an intriguing man. W.D. Howells' observations allow us to see a side of Mark Twain that Twain himself would never have shown to us--his thoroughly vulnerable, boyish innocence, even in his later life. To read Howells' keen insights into the makings of this American icon makes for a truly fascinating read.