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King Arthur's Enchantresses: Morgan and her Sisters in Arthurian Tradition epub

by Carolyne Larrington


King Arthur's Enchantresses: Morgan and her Sisters in Arthurian Tradition epub

ISBN: 1845111133

ISBN13: 978-1845111137

Author: Carolyne Larrington

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: I.B.Tauris (October 17, 2006)

Pages: 272 pages

ePUB book: 1628 kb

FB2 book: 1413 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 873

Other Formats: mobi doc lrf lit





Carolyne Larrington is Fellow and Tutor in Medieval English at St John's College, Oxford, U.

So as you might imagine this book was a bit of a holy grail for me when I discovered it.

"A good book on Arthur's enchantresses, Morgan-le-Fay among them, is long overdue, and this one is very good. For anyone with the slightest interest in the subject, King Arthur's Enchantresses will be essential reading. "-Allan Massie, author of Arthur the King ""If you have always loved the stories of the Knights of the Round Table, but want to know more: then this is the book for you. If you've heard of the names - Lancelot, Guinevere, Morgan Le Fay - but never read the stories: then King Arthur's Enchantresses is the book that you have to read.

Carolyne Larrington is an expert on myth and is an authority on all aspects of the Arthurian story. In this fascinating book she offers a novel and thoroughly contemporary take on the myth by focussing on the various powerful, magical women who play a central part in Arthur’s life and exploits. These women are mysterious, often sexually alluring figures, capable of harnessing magic for good as well as for subversive ends.

King Arthur's Enchantresses book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

King Arthur's Enchantresses book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking King Arthur's Enchantresses: Morgan and Her Sisters in Arthurian Tradition as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Larrington explores the characters of Morgan le Fey and her sisters (related by vocation or by blood) and the ways in which these characters challenge masculine hierarchy from their earliest appearances in the mid twelfth century to modern times.

King Arthur's Enchantresses makes a unique contribution to writing on the Arthurian myths. It will intrigue and delight anyone with an interest in mythology, religion, cultural history and medieval literature. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything.

In King Arthur's Enchantresses, Carolyne Larrington surveys representations of Morgan le Fay, the Lady of the Lake, the Viviane/Niviene figure, and Morgause in medieval literature, Victorian re-imaginings, and modern popular culture

In King Arthur's Enchantresses, Carolyne Larrington surveys representations of Morgan le Fay, the Lady of the Lake, the Viviane/Niviene figure, and Morgause in medieval literature, Victorian re-imaginings, and modern popular culture. The introduction points out that in medieval texts the enchantresses are not witches but aristocratic women who have learned magic and whose actions defy traditional concepts of feminine behavior.

King Arthur's Enchantresses : Morgan and Her Sisters in Arthurian Tradition Her previous books include Magical Tales: Myth, Legend.

King Arthur's Enchantresses : Morgan and Her Sisters in Arthurian Tradition. By (author) Carolyne Larrington. Carolyne Larrington is Fellow and Tutor in Medieval English Literature at St John's College, Oxford. Her previous books include Magical Tales: Myth, Legend and Enchantment in Children's Books (2013) show more.

Enchantresses : Morgan and Her Sisters in Arthurian Tradition. Carolyne Larrington brings these dangerous women fully and vibrantly to life. by Carolyne Larrington. Central to the legends of King Arthur are the mysterious, sexually alluring enchantresses, those spellcasters and mistresses of magic who wield extraordinary influence over Arthur's life and destiny, bestriding the Camelot mythology with a dark and brooding presence. Yet until now no book has told their stories in depth.

King Arthur: the very name summons visions of courtly chivalry and towering castles, of windswept battlefields and heroic quests, and above all of the monarch who dies but who one day shall return again.  The Arthurian legend lives on as powerfully and enduringly as ever. Yet there is an aspect to this myth which has been neglected, but which is perhaps its most potent part of all.  For central to the Arthurian stories are the mysterious, sexually alluring enchantresses, those spellcasters and mistresses of magic who wield extraordinary influence over Arthur's life and destiny, bestriding the Camelot mythology with a dark, brooding presence. Echoing the search for the Grail, Carolyne Larrington takes her readers on a quest of her own - to discover why these dangerous women continue to bewitch us.  Her journey takes in the enchantresses as they appear in poetry and painting, on the Internet and TV, in high culture and popular culture.  She shows that whether they be chaste or depraved, necrophiliacs or virgins, the Arthurian enchantresses  are manifestations of the feared, uncontainable Other, frightening and fascinating in equal measure.
The book analyses the enchantresses of the Arthurian romances (Morgan le Fay, the Lady of the Lake...) and their role in the stories we all know and enjoy. The analysis is done mostly through feminist criticism, but there are also interesting sections on magic. Overall, I found it a very engaging and informative book. The only fault that I noticed - and this is very personal, of course - is that very little space is devoted to the links between Morgan and her possible Celtic or pre-Celtic ancestors. Having read Loomis and Paton, I expected more on the topic - and perhaps something new. However, this is a very good book, to be read together with, for example, "On Arthurian Women. Essay in Memory of Maureen Fries" (2001).
I wanted an academic overview of the Arthurian mysteries according to what little fictional accounts exist and this book came through in aces. It gets a little long-winded in places, but definitely took care of my own research needs and was very helpful
I'm writing this review from the perspective of an Arthurian enthusiast and a modern pagan. For me, the most compelling characters in Arthurian lore were the Enchantresses with Morgan le Fay being my personal favorite. So as you might imagine this book was a bit of a holy grail for me when I discovered it. I loved its approach of looking at the literary origins of these ladies with care and attention to where and when major shifts began to appear in their characters. It explores which authors added what to their stories and meditates on why this happened.

As a pagan I loved that the author was able to sensitively debunk certain myths (that the Morrigan is the origin of Morgan le Fay) while still pointing out that the modern interpretations are valid shifts for the characters and in line with the way they have been shifting for centuries.

If you love Morgan, Nimue, Viviane, and all the rest then do get this book.
I knew a bit of what was in this book before I purchased it, I had been using a library copy for work in obtaining my Master's Degree (My specialty is Arthurian literature and I needed some good sources on Morgan le Fay). However, I did not realize when I purchased this book, how beautiful a brand new copy was going to be. The text is informative and just what I needed and the beautiful paintings reproduced in the text were a pleasant surprise to find.