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The Maias (Penguin Classics) epub

by Eca de Queiros,Patricia McGowan Pinheiro,Ann Stevens


The Maias (Penguin Classics) epub

ISBN: 014044694X

ISBN13: 978-0140446944

Author: Eca de Queiros,Patricia McGowan Pinheiro,Ann Stevens

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Classics (July 1, 1999)

ePUB book: 1154 kb

FB2 book: 1858 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 439

Other Formats: mobi mbr docx lrf





See if your friends have read any of Patricia McGowan Pinheiro's books. Eça de Queirós, Patricia McGowan Pinheiro (Translation). Ann Stevens (Translation).

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By (author) Eca de Queiros, Translated by Ann Stevens, Translated by Patricia McGowan. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

In the end he is reduced to a kind of spiritual helplessness and his good intentions are reduced to dilettantism. His passionate love affair begins to suffer a devastating constraint. Download The Maias by Eça de Queirós, Patricia McGowan Pinheiro, Ann Stevens free

In the end he is reduced to a kind of spiritual helplessness and his good intentions are reduced to dilettantism. Download The Maias by Eça de Queirós, Patricia McGowan Pinheiro, Ann Stevens free. The Maias by Eça de Queirós, Patricia McGowan Pinheiro, Ann Stevens fb2 DOWNLOAD FREE.

Patricia McGowen Pinheiro Ann Stevens. Country Works by José Maria de Eça de Queirós. The Mystery of the Sintra Road (1870). The first English translation, by Patricia McGowan Pinheiro and Ann Stevens was published in 1965 by St. Martins Press. In 2007 Dedalus Books published a new English translation by Margaret Jull Costa which won the 2008 Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize. Film, TV and theatrical adaptations. Works by José Maria de Eça de Queirós.

Find nearly any book by Patricia McGowan Pinheiro. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. Patricia McGowan Pinheiro at LibraryThing.

Eca de Quéiros was a 19th-century Portuguese novelist. The Maias has been brilliantly translated by Patricia MacGowan Pinheiro and Ann Stevens, who have produced an equivalent masterpiece in English. I've just finished reading Eça de Queiroz' The Maias, a work poignantly saturated with this feeling of regret. Prepare for the book by listening to Amália Rodrigues, experiencing the feeling of saudade so prevalent in Portuguese artists. José Maria de Eça de Queiroz (1845-1900) is considered Portugal's greatest novelist, and The Maias (1888) his greatest novel.

lifetime the spelling was Eça de Queiroz, and this is the form that appears . Eça de Queirós was born in Póvoa de Varzim, Portugal, in 1845. Os Maias (The Maias): translation by Ann Stevens and Patricia McGowan Pinheiro, St. Martin's Press, 1965

Eça de Queirós was born in Póvoa de Varzim, Portugal, in 1845. An illegitimate child, he was officially recorded as the son of José Maria de Almeida Teixeira de Queirós and Carolina Augusta Pereira d'Eça. Martin's Press, 1965. Os Maias (The Maias): translation by Margaret Jull Costa, New Directions, 2007. O Defunto (Our Lady of the Pillar): translation by Edgar Prestage, Archibald Constable, 1906.

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and .

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. Hailed by the Washington Post Book World as "a modern classic," Robertson Davies’s acclaimed Deptford Trilogy is a glittering, fantastical, cunningly contrived series of novels.98.

Published by the Penguin Group Penguin Books Ltd, 27 Wrights Lane, London W8 5TZ, England Penguin Books USA Inc . Mangiarotti worked somewhere in the 14th anon- 10 dissement, the Porte de Vanves area of Paris.

Published by the Penguin Group Penguin Books Ltd, 27 Wrights Lane, London W8 5TZ, England Penguin Books USA In. 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014, USA Penguin Books Australia Ltd, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia Penguin Books Canada Ltd, 10 Alcorn Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4V 3B2 Penguin Books (NZ) Ltd, 182-190 Wairau Road, Auckland 10. .

It is only when Hurtle meets an egocentric adolescent whom he sees as his spiritual child does he experience a deeper, more treacherous emotion in this tour de force of sexual and psychological menace that sheds brutally honest light on the creative experience

It is only when Hurtle meets an egocentric adolescent whom he sees as his spiritual child does he experience a deeper, more treacherous emotion in this tour de force of sexual and psychological menace that sheds brutally honest light on the creative experience. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

One of the key classics of Portuguese literature, by an author compared to Proust, Flaubert, Stendhal, Dickens, Balzac, and Tolstoy. Eca de Queiros was Portugal's greatest nineteenth-century novelist, whose works brilliantly evoke--and condemn--the rapidly changing society of his times. The Maias (1888) depicts the declining fortunes of a landowning family over three generations as they are gradually undermined by hypocrisy, complacency, and sexual license. With a vivid, comprehensive portrayal of nineteenth-century Portuguese politics and social history, Eca creates a kind of comedie humaine that, despite the force of its social satire and its damning critique of the Portugal from which he had exiled himself, is a supreme work of humor and irony. The author was a diplomat who traveled widely, and although he claimed to be an apostle of naturalist realism, he reveals with detached irony the lethargy and decadence of his native land. The book initially attracted attention through its account of an incestuous romance, yet today we can see this as just one element in a novel whose compelling story, depth of thought, and compassion make it one of Europe's great literary masterpieces. "A restless mingling of poetry, sharp realism and wit . . . his excellent prose glides through real experience and private dream in a manner that is leading on toward the achievements of Proust." --V. S. Pritchett
"Of all words of tongue and pen,/the saddest are 'It might have been'" says Bret Harte. I've just finished reading Eça de Queiroz' The Maias, a work poignantly saturated with this feeling of regret. Prepare for the book by listening to Amália Rodrigues, experiencing the feeling of saudade so prevalent in Portuguese artists.

José Maria de Eça de Queiroz (1845-1900) is considered Portugal's greatest novelist, and The Maias (1888) his greatest novel. Other books by de Queiroz are The Sins of Father Amaro (1876) and The Illustrious House of Ramires. The Maias has been brilliantly translated by Patricia MacGowan Pinheiro and Ann Stevens, who have produced an equivalent masterpiece in English.

In its ability to deal with tragic conflict while retaining such an exquisite beauty of form the book reminds me of the Attic drama of Aeschylus and Sophocles.

In a long book (over 600 pages) no detail is forgotten, and a convincing picture of mid 19th century Lisbon is built up. The characters all ring true: I felt I knew them well. The dozens of central characters are all alive, real people with faults, somehow lovable - Eça de Queiros writes with great affection even though he deplores the decay of a once great country. So many of the book's characters seem real, though presented in brief. They come and go and re-appear in a complex tapestry of events which makes them astoundingly like people I have known. Eça de Queiroz has the gift of bringing his world to life and making the reader a part of it. The mood is not tragic: ironic, satiric, even humorous at times, full of regret...let's just say saudade, even though we English speakers don't really know what that means. I was very moved while reading, and for long after. I feel sad that I do not have the ability of a de Queiroz to express what I had felt in reading the book.

Carlos Eduardo de Maia is the sole heir of an ancient, illustrious family. The family hopes and ambitions are dependent on him. Honour is a very real thing in this culture, and Carlos has a lot of expectations to bear. The glorious past and the unsatisfactory present are both with him at all times. A central plot strand of the novel details the incestuous love of Carlos and Maria Eduarda, and the tragedy this brings to all concerned. The affair is skillfully built up, and comes to a shattering, Sophoclean climax.

The Maias is a book which mourns many things. The decadence of Portuguese culture and spirit; the passing of time; the loss of things undone. Carlos and his friend Ega in the end have fulfilled none of their youthful ambitions.

The ending, with the friends Carlos and Ega running after a tram, reminds me of the end of Fellini Satyricon. One is suddenly made to realise that these people who have come to life so convincingly, who share my own pains and regrets, lived more than one hundred years ago. That poignant shock universalises the reading experience. Ambition, the great love of Carlos and Maria Eduarda, the virtues of Alfonso, the literary gifts of Ega, the pretensions and fantasies of so many of the characters, are all futile in the end. Fate, and perhaps some innocent fault of their own, conspires against them. Life wasn't meant to be fair, and looking back is often a bitter affair.

I put the book away with a word of encouragement to Carlos, this imaginary character who died almost a century ago. Don't be too cynical, I say: your gifts are great, and you have achieved much. Visit Maria Eduarda. Encourage Ega to finish his book. We all grow older, duller. What we love inevitably turns to dust. But still: to live! to love!

Finishing this book has been like saying goodbye to friends. Yet these friends: they are so alive, yet so dead, dead in two senses, living so long ago and being characters of fiction. Something that was lost long ago has been lost again today. The train pulls out and leaves someone behind on the platform to whom I can only say goodbye. I too am thinking more of what might have been than of what might be.

During the plague years in Elizabethan England Thomas Nashe expressed the same mood: "Beauty is but a flower,/Which wrinkles will devour./Brightness falls from the air;/ Queens have died young and fair..."
This is a great XIXth Century novel, with all the strenghts and shortcomings. The plot is conventional melodrama, which explains its being presently serialized by Brazilian TV, in an adaptation that has as its chief fault to take the story too much seriously. Eça was, above all, a master of good-naturedly irony,a fact enhanced in this novel by his forswearing the more strict realistic manner of Zola and Flauber in favour of Thackeray's and Dickens'. That explains why, although the novel is full of fin-de-siecle pessimism - above all about the possibilities of a developed bourgeois society in backward Portugal being possible - it's still so damned funny. Eça's irony has only one parallel among his contemporaries, the Brazilian novelist Machado de Assis. However, Eça loves too much his creatures to submit them to the bitter and torturing irony of Machado's.Having seem this English translation, I regard it as correct (Eça's plain language requiring no great flights of fancy from the translator) but miss the absence of some footnotes on historical and political matters that could help modern readership to feel more at ease. However, one can still do without them, as Eça's novels - just like Tolstoy's - have the ability to stand on their own feet even today. A must-read.
Always craving novelty, I was quite interested to read a novel by a guy I'd never heard of from a country about which I know nothing, literature-wise--let alone one which, according to the helpful editors and amazon reviewers, is an all-time classic, to boot. With Zola comparisons, to boot.
So all right, I read it. And now I find myself wondering if it wasn't...well, obscure for a reason. It isn't that The Maias is a bad novel, exactly, but it IS the least-compelling book I've read in a long time. Forget Zola; aside from a few moments of atmospheric vividness, and a nearly non-existent plot structure that could possibly be compared to Nana's, those don't really pan out. Actually, it's manifestly obvious that Eca's big influence was Flaubert--basically, A Sentimental Education, only in Lisbon. And, um, not nearly as good.
I think that the biggest problem is Eca's failure to create a particularly memorable cast of characters. Sure, Flaubert's characters are generally small, fairly trivial people, but they hold our interest nonetheless. Eca's characters, with a few exceptions, simply don't; the cast is large, but most of its members are colorless props without much more than a single personality trait apiece who sort of hover in the background to provide the necessary heads for the novel's numerous interminable set pieces. And the protagonist, Carlos da Maia, is emphatically no Frederic Moreau.
There are things that I liked about The Maias: the opening hundred or so pages, relating the family's history in brief up to Carlos's adulthood where the main narrative begins, engaged me fairly well (Carlos is a helluva lot more interesting as a child than an adult, actually); his great romance, once it begins, renewed my interest to an extent; and said romance's shattering climax (helpfully spoiled by both the back cover copy AND the introduction of this Penguin edition) is appropriately, well, shattering. The ending's also pretty good, if a bit heavy-handed--if you somehow had failed to notice it before, the influence of Flaubert's masterpiece should at least become apparent here. Still, these virtues aren't really enough to drown out the vices in my view; getting all the way through the book was a real act of willpower on my part.
It doesn't help either, of course, that the Penguin edition is so very lackluster. Given that Eca is an unfamiliar writer to most native English-speakers, and that nineteenth-century Portuguese history and culture are likewise generally mysterious, one would think that the editors would have made an extra effort to be helpful, but in this, alas, one would be wrong. The introduction feels very desultory and is almost wholly non-illuminating, there are virtually no footnotes, and those that do exist (all of them in the second half, which strengthens my theory that the two strangely biography-free translators didn't really collaborate, but rather each translated half, and then they mashed the two together--there's also the way the text abruptly starts abbreviating 'Senhor' at about the halfway mark) seem almost random--there are quite a few references that simply left me clueless. The translation isn't so hot either; while it seems servicable in general, there are occasional word choices and turns of phrase that make you go "guh?," and, as parenthetically noted above, there are some odd inconsistencies. All in all, it seems that the people responsible for assembling this volume got as bored as I did.
I don't know--I certainly don't want to discourage the exploration of other cultures, but if this is really the best that nineteenth-century Portugal has to offer...well. If you absolutely MUST read a nineteenth-century Portuguese novel, knock yourselves out, I suppose, but if all you're after is something from the last century in a language not traditionally associated with a great literary tradition, I humbly recommend Boleslaw Prus for your consideration.
Thank you for listening.