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Eudora Welty and Politics: Did the Writer Crusade? (Southern Literary Studies) epub

by Harriet Pollack,Suzanne Marrs


Eudora Welty and Politics: Did the Writer Crusade? (Southern Literary Studies) epub

ISBN: 0807126187

ISBN13: 978-0807126189

Author: Harriet Pollack,Suzanne Marrs

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: LSU Press; Edition Unstated edition (March 1, 2001)

Pages: 327 pages

ePUB book: 1587 kb

FB2 book: 1496 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 796

Other Formats: lrf rtf azw txt





Eudora Welty and Politics book.

Eudora Welty and Politics book. This collection of complementary and interrelated essays by ten. Eudora Welty and Politics provides just that, approaching Welty's work from an all-new point of view.

Suzanne Marrs is a professor of English at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi, and has served as. .

Suzanne Marrs is a professor of English at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi, and has served as Welty Scholar at the Mississipi Department of Archives and History. Series: Southern Literary Studies.

One Writer's Imagination: The Fiction of Eudora Welty, Louisiana State University Press (Baton Rouge, LA), 2002. SIDELIGHTS: Suzanne Marrs, who was a personal friend of Pulitzer Prize-winning American writer Eudora Welty, has written a biography and other books based on Welty's life and work.

This collection of complementary and interrelated essays by ten well-known Welty critics brings welcome clarification to the controversial subject of Eudora Welty and the political, a topic once presumed to be closed tight.

Southern literary studies. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.

Pollack, Harriet, ed. Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press, 2013. Eudora Welty and Politics: Did the Writer Crusade? Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2001. E-mail Citation . One revised and eleven original essays extend the examination of the author’s fiction and photography analyzed in Pollack and Marrs 2001 with a focus on racial politics, racialized whiteness, and race as performance.

In One Writer's Imagination, Suzanne Marrs draws upon nearly twenty years of conversations, interviews, and friendship with Eudora Welty to discuss the intersections between biography and art in the Pulitzer Prize winner's work. Through an engaging chronological and comprehensive reading of the Welty canon, Marrs describes the ways Welty's creative process transformed and transfigured fact to serve the purposes of fiction. She points to the sparks that lit Welty's imagination - an imagination that thrived on polarities in her personal life and in society at large.

Yet in its misguided condescension, it makes startlingly, even achingly, clear the need for this collection, and for clarification of the controversial subject of Welty and the political" (18)

This book offered a wealth of information on how Welty incorporated race into her work and how she felt about doing so. The essays were informative and together formed a solid look.

This book offered a wealth of information on how Welty incorporated race into her work and how she felt about doing so. The essays were informative and together formed a solid look at Welty's opinions and actions in a scholarly yet very readable book. 2 people found this helpful.

This collection of complementary and interrelated essays by ten well-known Welty critics brings welcome clarification to the controversial subject of Eudora Welty and the political, a topic once presumed to be closed tight. As the essays prove, Welty has been inaccurately assessed by critics from Diana Trilling in the Nation (1943) to Claudia Roth Pierpont in the New Yorker (1998) as a writer who avoids political, historical, or cultural engagement in her fiction. The better question these essayists explore is not whether but how Welty’s work is to be understood as political.

Harriet Pollack, Suzanne Marrs, Peggy Prenshaw, Noel Polk, Suzan Harrison, Ann Romines, Rebecca Mark, Barbara Ladd, Sharon Baris, and Danièle Pitavy-Souques place Welty’s seeming rejection of the political in her 1961 essay “Must the Novelist Crusade?” into the cultural and historical context of 1940–1960, when “individualism” was a code word for political and personal freedom and was defined in contrast to totalitarianism as represented by Mussolini, Hitler, and Stalin. Welty, they show, though she repudiated the concept of fiction as editorial, wrote stories that were inherently and unavoidably political.

The essayists look closely at how surprisingly often Welty’s fiction, criticism, and photographs are oblique responses to public political issues―political corruption, racial apartheid, poverty, McCarthyism and the Rosenberg trials, violent resistance to the civil rights movement, integration of schools, and filial piety and southern reverence for identities of the cultural past. The deceptive opposition of the terms private and political may be most at fault for misreading Welty.

As the only living author to be reedited by the Library of America, Eudora Welty deserves a sound appreciation of her complex oeuvre. Eudora Welty and Politics provides just that, approaching Welty’s work from an all-new point of view to reveal how the writer repeatedly registered a political vision in her work.