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Fifty More Fables of La Fontaine epub

by Jean de Fontaine,Norman R. Shapiro


Fifty More Fables of La Fontaine epub

ISBN: 0252066502

ISBN13: 978-0252066504

Author: Jean de Fontaine,Norman R. Shapiro

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: University of Illinois Press (December 1, 1997)

Pages: 192 pages

ePUB book: 1515 kb

FB2 book: 1186 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 826

Other Formats: mbr mobi rtf azw





That Jean de La Fontaine problematized the fable genre is now well known, thanks to American, British, and German criticism of the late 20th century

That Jean de La Fontaine problematized the fable genre is now well known, thanks to American, British, and German criticism of the late 20th century. Even the French have reluctantly admitted this and dropped the Fables from the baccalaureat program, which privileges what Roland Barthes called the "readable" text, free of ambiguity, unstable irony, allusive metaphor, and aggressive (but usually covert) dialogue with earlier literature.

David Schorr has just as captivatingly illustrated them.

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Jean de La Fontaine collected fables from a wide variety of sources, both Western and Eastern, and adapted them into French free verse. They were issued under the general title of Fables in several volumes from 1668 to 1694 and are considered classics of French literature. Humorous, nuanced and ironical, they were originally aimed at adults but then entered the educational system and were required learning for school children. He gets the tune right and the tone right, and manages to echo both the folk wisdom and the poker-faced formality of the originals.

His principal contribution to literature was his 12 books of Fables, to which he devoted 30 years of his life.

These wonderfully wrought moral tales charm children with bright and basic truths as they delight adults with reflectively subtle, sophisticated facets of wit and wisdom. His principal contribution to literature was his 12 books of Fables, to which he devoted 30 years of his life. They were published from 1668 to 1694 and are universally appreciated in France by children and adults alike.

Better known for his Fables, La Fontaine (1621-95) also caught his public's attention .

Better known for his Fables, La Fontaine (1621-95) also caught his public's attention with a collection of verse tales, Contes et nouvelles en vers, written and published in a variety of groupings. In drawing on a tradition of the fable going back to Aesop, La Fontaine created a portrait of human life and French society through the representations of animals.

Illustrated by David Schorr

Illustrated by David Schorr. David Schorr has just as captivatingly illustrated them.

eading Jean de La Fontaine's fables is a double pleasure. These short moralistic narrative poems are not only witty, but they also evince a wonderful (I was going to say "fabulous") poetic skill.

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These wonderfully wrought moral tales will as easily charm children with bright and basic truths as they will delight adults drawn to their reflectively subtle, sophisticated facets of wit and wisdom.
Shapiro's verse translations are incredible. The same person who has just done the most faithful and most poetic rendering of Baudelaire has no less flawlessly met the very different demands of La Fontaine, with all the latter's elegance (and, when called for, inelegance) of tone, stylistic devices, phlosophical depth, and playful humor. His translations lose nothing of the originals. One even feels that the spirit and voice of La Fontaine are speaking here. A truly remarkable achievement. Bravo!
La Fontaine has never fared better in English than in Shapiro's translations. To say more is to gild the lily.
La Fontaine's fables look good. Where do I get more of La Fontaine's fables in French? (en francais?) [email protected]
Shapiro is most successful with the fables that deviate least from Greco-Roman objectivity, linear organization, and insistence on eternally recurring traits. But when his source texts are most lafontainian - skeptical or epicurean in viewpoint, dense, resonant, and conflictual in method, as well as radically creative with genre norms, Shapiro corrects the French poet's eclecticism by skillful massaging, tweaking, and pruning. The result is an undeniably delicious read - fluent, lively, and transparent - but like Fifty Fables of La Fontaine, Fifty More is less a translation than a thorough-going and backward-looking adaptation, as remote in profile from the original as La Fontaine's fables are from their classical models.