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Baltimore's Mansion epub

by Wayne Johnston


Baltimore's Mansion epub

ISBN: 0385500319

ISBN13: 978-0385500319

Author: Wayne Johnston

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Doubleday (May 16, 2000)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB book: 1110 kb

FB2 book: 1795 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 615

Other Formats: azw doc rtf mobi





Baltimore’s Mansion is an unusual and vibrant book, a fine tribute to the island that has been such a formidable part of the Johnston and other clans, a land whose influence is hard to define but is evident in the way one views the world.

Winner of the Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction Shortlisted for the 1999 Governor General’s Award for Non-Fiction. A love letter not only to homeland, but to his father, a staunch anti-Confederate unable to relinquish his vision of what Newfoundland once was and could have been. Baltimore’s Mansion is an unusual and vibrant book, a fine tribute to the island that has been such a formidable part of the Johnston and other clans, a land whose influence is hard to define but is evident in the way one views the world. The Edmonton Journal.

So begins Baltimore's Mansion, Wayne Johnston's story of his grandfather Charlie, his father Arthur and of the small community of Ferryland on Newfoundland's Avalon Peninsula, founded as a Catholic community by Lord Baltimore in the 1620s. Charlie, a fisherman and blacksmith, is an ardent Newfoundland nationalist

This is how he was engaged when our school had What Does Your Father Do?. Day when I was twelve, and each of us spent a day on the job with our fathers.

This is how he was engaged when our school had What Does Your Father Do?. Day when I was twelve, and each of us spent a day on the job with our fathers or the whole day tasting fish, using spit buckets the way television actors making food commercials do. Between tastes, they gargled palate-cleansing water, which they likewise spat into the buckets. A woman circulated constantly, refilling their glasses, a jug of water in each hand.

Baltimore, the title of the book, refers to one of the first settlers to the area who arrived in the 17th century, weathered one winter and fled after most of his group died, largely as a result of the horrific winters.

In stock on June 21, 2018. Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Baltimore, the title of the book, refers to one of the first settlers to the area who arrived in the 17th century, weathered one winter and fled after most of his group died, largely as a result of the horrific winters. Clearly Newfoundland is not a warm and welcoming place, but that doesn't matter and that's what the author does such a good job conveying.

Baltimore's Mansion book. Wayne Johnston never fails to give me a book hangover. I feel like this should be required reading for all Newfoundlanders. I actually cried when I finished.

About Baltimore’s Mansion. In this loving memoir Wayne Johnston returns to Newfoundland-the people, the place, the politics-and illuminates his family’s story with all the power and drama he brought to his magnificent novel, The Colony of Unrequited Dreams

About Baltimore’s Mansion. In this loving memoir Wayne Johnston returns to Newfoundland-the people, the place, the politics-and illuminates his family’s story with all the power and drama he brought to his magnificent novel, The Colony of Unrequited Dreams. Descendents of the Irish who settled in Ferryland, Lord Baltimore’s Catholic colony in Newfoundland, the Johnstons "went from being sea-fearing farmers to sea-faring fishermen

The book climaxes with Johnston’s movingly imagined re-creation of the final days, during which Charlie and Art separately (and dourly) await the dawning of Confederation, and with it the loss of their country’s independence and their awareness of their own powerlessness and mortality. Johnston is a master of understatement wringing honest nostalgic emotion from simple declarative sentences. Here he offers a rich display of the rhetorical skills and heartfelt cultural recall that make his novels so enchanting and rewarding. Pub Date: June 16th, 2000.

Baltimore's Mansion introduces us to the Johnstons of Ferryland, a Catholic colony founded by Lord Baltimore in the 1620s on the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland . Baltimore's Mansion - Wayne Johnston.

Baltimore's Mansion introduces us to the Johnstons of Ferryland, a Catholic colony founded by Lord Baltimore in the 1620s on the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland, and centres on three generations of fathers and sons. Filled with heart-stopping description and a cast of stubborn, acerbic, yet utterly irresistible family members, it is an evocation of a time and a place reminiscent of Wayne Johnston's best fiction. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

The acclaimed author of The Colony of Unrequited Dreams introduces us to the Johnstons of Newfoundland in an intimate, captivating memoir of three generations of fathers and sons.The New York Times called Wayne Johnston's The Colony of Unrequited Dreams "an eventful, character-rich book...a brilliant and bravura literary performance."  His marvelous new memoir, Baltimore's Mansion, is equally impressive, filled with heart-stopping descriptions, a cast of stubborn, acerbic, yet entirely irresistible family members, and an evocation of time and place reminiscent of his best fiction. Charlie Johnston is the famed blacksmith of Ferryland, a Catholic colony founded by Lord Baltimore in the 1620s on the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland.  For his prowess at the forge, he is considered as necessary as a parish priest at local weddings.  But he must spend the first cold hours of every workday fishing at sea with his sons, one of whom, the author's father, Arthur, vows that as an adult he will never look to the sea for his livelihood.In the heady months leading to the referendum that results in Newfoundland being "inducted" into Canada, Art leaves the island for college and an eventual career with Canadian Fisheries, studying and regulating a livelihood he and his father once pursued.  He parts on mysterious terms with Charlie, who dies while he's away, and Art is plunged into a lifelong battle with the personal demons that haunted the end of their relationship.  Years later, Wayne prepares to leave at the same age Art was when he said good-bye to Charlie, and old patterns threaten to repeat themselves.At times a harrowing tale of trails in the darkness, of grand desolation and dangerous coasts, Baltimore's Mansion speaks to us all about the hardships, blessings, and power of family relationships, of leaving home and returning.
enjoyed reading account of author's family history, good read!
This is the stuff of magic.
Absolutely wonderful stories about Newfoundland. However, the Kindle text was marred by many errors.
Although I have not read "Baltimore's Mansion" yet I really enjoy Wayne Johnston's books. I'd bet anything that he would appreciate if his name was spelled Johnston rather than Johnson.
While true the period of time of "remaining righteous" may be finite, it needn't be necessarily short. In the case of the Johnston Family the third of that generation deals with the consequences to this day. "Baltimore's Mansion" is both true Family History together with the autobiographical experience of the Author. He may not have witnessed all he memorializes, but the feeling you get while reading is that if there is a line between the two it is seamless. And that this is true is due to the Author's insight into the memories of others he experiences as opposed to the memories that are his own.
The prose of this book is rich it is thick and dense. I intend that comment in only the most positive manner. There is nothing extraneous as you read, every sentence is important; this book is as long as it needs to be, no more or no less. I always had the impression the Author chose each word or phrase he wrote carefully and with purpose. The writing needs no embellishment it is precise and honest.
The book is about change, about change that is often not wanted, about progress that is anything but, rather it is a series of events that strips away a people's identity, the ground their homes are built upon, the jobs they have known for generations, and ultimately the Families themselves.
The damage and dislocation that is suffered that is external is magnified by secrets and thought kept hidden for decades that if shared would have changed the lives of these Families. The book is about regret, missed opportunities, and an unwillingness to accept change that goes beyond simply sad to truly painful and destructive.
I recently read "No Great Mischief" and while no 2 Authors are alike, I believe if you have read and enjoyed either you will enjoy them both.
Whether describing an event that will change the course of a people, or of a young man sweeping away the imprints of horseshoes that do not bear his Father's mark (a Rose), the Author shows with great clarity the similarities and the futility of going against the tide.
As to those who were on the "Winning" side as always the Author states it best, "We won, we won and nothing you can say can change that fact, and nothing makes victory sweeter than the enduring bitterness of men like you." The man being referred to here is the Author's Father.
Wonderful book.
There is a dramatic nostalgia to this memoir that becomes overbearing by the end but is enticing and rich at the beginning. Johnston recounts the history of Newfoundlands confederation and how powerful an effect it had on his family. What becomes clear in the reading is how powerful (or how imagined) the pull of place can be. Johnston's father and grandfather are very immersed in their location but not just geographically but what it means to them spiritually or physically. And, yet, the grandfather apparently votes against Newfoundland remaining its own country and disappoints his son so powerfully that the son carries this disappointment with him and passes it on the author himself.

What I find difficult in these books is the sense that the characters can't move on. Isn't there a moment when people can no longer hold onto that which was or that which they wished were? Apparently not.

Baltimore, the title of the book, refers to one of the first settlers to the area who arrived in the 17th century, weathered one winter and fled after most of his group died, largely as a result of the horrific winters. Clearly Newfoundland is not a warm and welcoming place, but that doesn't matter and that's what the author does such a good job conveying."
Any book that can make a reader who hales from the land of pleasant living (i.e., the mid-Atlantic region of the United States) seriously consider spending a winter in Newfoundland is clearly worth reading. Wayne Johnston once again manages to turn what most of us would consider a very dull subject (growing up in Newfoundland) into a minor masterpiece. If you enjoyed "Colony of Unrequited Dreams," you will be equally charmed, intrigued and entranced by "Baltimore's Mansion" but in a more personal -- and, perhaps, more meaningful -- way. I expect that if Mr. Johnston were from the USA, his books would stay at the top of the best seller lists. As it is, he remains a bit of a hidden treasure. Perhaps "Baltimore's Mansion" will help change the situation.
Being from the other side of the confederation with Canada event (my family was pro-confederation), I found Johnson's memoir a real eyeopener to the sense of defeat and angst found in the loss of Newfoundland's precarious nationhood. The political subtext amplifies the family melodrama of loss and defeat. Although a bit too `Irish' for my taste in Newfoundland set stories, the writing is profound and the best in the english language currently being turned out these days. Johnson's family were smiths with iron and his writing is the same; that is, he turns the raw iron of language into something minimal, economical and heavy that carries the weight and experience of generations. Like the anchors, nails, and iron shoes, Johnson's writing will stand the test of time's weathering I'm sure.