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True Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay epub

by James J. O'Hara


True Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay epub

ISBN: 0472106600

ISBN13: 978-0472106608

Author: James J. O'Hara

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: Univ of Michigan Pr (July 1, 1996)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB book: 1131 kb

FB2 book: 1957 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 604

Other Formats: rtf lrf mobi lit





In his new book, James O'Hara has produced a richly annotated, comprehensive collection of examples of etymological wordplay in the Aeneid, Eclogues, and Georgics

In his new book, James O'Hara has produced a richly annotated, comprehensive collection of examples of etymological wordplay in the Aeneid, Eclogues, and Georgics. An extensive introduction on the etymologizing of Vergil and his poetic forerunners places the poet in historical context and analyzes the form and style of his wordplay. O'Hara also discusses how etymologizing served Vergil's poetic goals, and he explains how the role of word origins in Vergil's poems illuminates the origins and essential characteristics of the Roman people.

In his new book, James O'Hara has produced a richly annotated, comprehensive collection of examples of etymological wordplay in the Aeneid, Eclogues, and Georgics

In his new book, James O'Hara has produced a richly annotated, comprehensive collection of examples of etymological wordplay in the Aeneid, Eclogues, and Georgics.

True Names has two parts, a basic introduction on ancient etymological thinking . James O'Hara, who previously gave Vergilian studies a monograph on prophecy, has now contributed a reference work on the author's technique.

True Names has two parts, a basic introduction on ancient etymological thinking (for more see Robert Maltby's forthcoming monograph) and then a "reasonably comprehensive collection of examples of etymological wordplay in Vergil". In O'Hara's opinion, his second section, which occupies about two-thirds of the volume, is the more important and more useful part of the book.

In True Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay, James O’Hara presents a richly annotated, comprehensive collection of examples o. .

In True Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay, James O’Hara presents a richly annotated, comprehensive collection of examples of etymological wordplay in Vergil’s Aeneid, Eclogues, and Georgics. In True Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay, James O’Hara presents a richly annotated, comprehensive collection of examples of etymological wordplay in Vergil’s Aeneid, Eclogues, and Georgics.

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An extensive introduction on the etymologizing of Vergil and his poetic forerunners places the poet i.

Publisher: Ann Arbor : Univ. of Michigan Press, 1996. Book, Internet Resource. All Authors, Contributors: James J O'Hara. Virgil - Literary style. Find more information about: James J O'Hara. ISBN: 047210472106608.

Similar books and articles. What's in a Name? J. J. O'Hara: True Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay. Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series . Pp. Xiv + 825. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2008.

What's in a Name? - J. xvii + 320. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. Llewelyn Morgan (a1).

O’Hara’s catalogue of Vergilian etymological wordplay is a goldmine of information and a welcome contribution to.I greatly enjoyed immersing myself in James O'Hara's fantastically learned True Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay.

O’Hara’s catalogue of Vergilian etymological wordplay is a goldmine of information and a welcome contribution to Vergilian studie. vid scholars will read with interest section . 4 of the Introduction, where O’Hara lists and discusses examples of Ovid’s allusions to Vergil’s etymological wordplay. Every Vergil scholar will want a copy of this book. -Alison Sharrock, Greece & Rome. The book will establish itself immediately as an essential tool in the library of any Virgilia.

In ancient thinking about etymology, knowledge of a term's origin meant knowledge of the essential qualities of the person, place, or thing it named. While scholars have long noted Vergil's allusions to etymologies, interest in such wordplay has grown rapidly in recent years and lies at the heart of contemporary scholarship's growing concern with the learned aspects and Alexandrian background of Vergilian poetry.In his new book, James O'Hara has produced a richly annotated, comprehensive collection of examples of etymological wordplay in the Aeneid, Eclogues, and Georgics. An extensive introduction on the etymologizing of Vergil and his poetic forerunners places the poet in historical context and analyzes the form and style of his wordplay. O'Hara also discusses how etymologizing served Vergil's poetic goals, and he explains how the role of word origins in Vergil's poems illuminates the origins and essential characteristics of the Roman people.The etymological catalog quotes each Vergilian passage, then explains the wordplay or possible wordplay, and refers to ancient grammarians and poets who mention similar etymologies. While bibliographical references are provided for most examples, many entries describe examples of wordplay never before noticed. Throughout the catalog, extensive cross-references direct the reader and render consultation easy.