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What Poetry Brings to Business epub

by Kirsten Lange,Ted Buswick,John Barr,Clare Morgan


What Poetry Brings to Business epub

ISBN: 0472050869

ISBN13: 978-0472050864

Author: Kirsten Lange,Ted Buswick,John Barr,Clare Morgan

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: History & Criticism

Language: English

Publisher: University of Michigan Press (April 14, 2010)

Pages: 280 pages

ePUB book: 1180 kb

FB2 book: 1608 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 668

Other Formats: lrf lit rtf doc





Clare Morgan is Director of the graduate creative writing program at the University of Oxford

Clare Morgan is Director of the graduate creative writing program at the University of Oxford. She has run workshops and given presentations on this topic in the United States, the United Kingdom, continental Europe, and Japan. Dr. Morgan is a fiction writer and critic, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. Kirsten Lange and Ted Buswick are employed by The Boston Consulting Group, an international management consulting firm, she as Managing Director of the Munich office, he as head of Oral History and Archiving.

John Barr, President, Poetry Foundation . At last there is a book that explores the deep but unexpected connections between business and poetry. What does poetry bring to business? According to Clare Morgan and her coauthors, it brings complexity and flexibility of thinking, along with the ability to empathize with and better understand the thoughts and feelings of others.

John Barr, President, Poetry Foundation "At last . The Problem Morgan explored in her book What Poetry Brings to Business the deep but unexpected connections between business and poetry.

John Barr, President, Poetry Foundation "At last there is a book that explores the deep but unexpected connections between business and poetry. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text.

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Clare Morgan, with Kirsten Lange and Ted Buswick. Clare Morgan and her colleagues demonstrate how the creative energy, emotional power, and communicative complexity of poetry relate directly to the practical needs for innovation and problem solving that face business managers.

In 2010, Clare Morgan, director of the graduate writing center at the university of Oxford, published What Poetry Brings to Business, coauthored with Kirsten Lange and Ted Buswick of the Boston Consulting Group

In 2010, Clare Morgan, director of the graduate writing center at the university of Oxford, published What Poetry Brings to Business, coauthored with Kirsten Lange and Ted Buswick of the Boston Consulting Group. Morgan’s book doesn’t actually challenge Whyte’s for preeminence; in fact, she doesn’t even mention him or The Heart Aroused. She’s English and he’s Welsh; it might be one of those intra-Britain rivalry things (although Whyte moved to America). Whyte used various and well known literary works, such as Beowulf, to discuss how poetry applied to the corporate soul.

John Barr, President, Poetry Foundation

John Barr, President, Poetry Foundation.

What does poetry bring to business? According to Clare Morgan and her coauthors, it brings a complexity and flexibility of. .

What does poetry bring to business? According to Clare Morgan and her coauthors, it brings a complexity and flexibility of thinking, along with the ability to empathize and better understand the thoughts and feelings of others. The University of Michigan Press.

What Poetry Brings to Business By Clare Morgan, with Kirsten Lange and Ted Buswick. Business and poetry draw their waters out of the same well

What Poetry Brings to Business By Clare Morgan, with Kirsten Lange and Ted Buswick. Business and poetry draw their waters out of the same well. -John Barr, President, Poetry Foundation In an article about poetry in the boardroom, Morgan states: A poem is a distillation of thought, experience, emotion into a tightly controlled form which utilizes words, images, sound and rhythm patterns to create a complex set of meanings that constantly form and re-form themselves.

"Creativity is a means of controlling chaos, finding order. Business and poetry draw their waters out of the same well."---John Barr, President, Poetry Foundation

"At last there is a book that explores the deep but unexpected connections between business and poetry. Clare Morgan and her colleagues demonstrate how the creative energy, emotional power, and communicative complexity of poetry relate directly to the practical needs for innovation and problem solving that face business managers. There has never been a book on developing managerial potential quite like this one."---Dana Gioia, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts and a former corporate executive at General Foods

What does poetry bring to business? According to Clare Morgan and her coauthors, it brings complexity and flexibility of thinking, along with the ability to empathize with and better understand the thoughts and feelings of others. Through her own experiences and many examples, Morgan demonstrates that the skills necessary to talk and think about poetry can be of significant benefit to leaders and strategists, to executives who are facing infinite complexity and who are armed with finite resources in a changing world.

What Poetry Brings to Business presents ways in which reading and thinking about poetry offer businesspeople new strategies for reflection on their companies, their daily tasks, and their work environments. The goal is both to increase and broaden readers' understanding of poems and how they convey meaning, and also to help readers develop analytical and cognitive skills that will be beneficial in a business context. The unique combinations and connections made in this book will open new avenues of thinking about poetry and business alike.

Clare Morgan is Director of the graduate creative writing programme at the University of Oxford. She has run workshops and given presentations on this topic in the United States, the United Kingdom, continental Europe, and Japan. Dr. Morgan is a fiction writer and critic, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

Kirsten Lange and Ted Buswick are employed by The Boston Consulting Group, an international management consulting firm, she as Managing Director of the Munich office, he as head of Oral History and Archiving.

This book was like opening a door to a completely new world to me. Bringing some poetry to my business was the best decision I made and I truly believe that doing business doesn't have to be boring, tiring and stressful. On the contrary - we can make it to be beautiful just like any poem is :)

Maja Todorovic
businessinrhyme.com
From time to time I teach some modules about metaphors, narratives and ethics to business executives from multinational companies. I read this book to give me ideas about how to freshen up my material, and indeed got a couple of helpful hints.

In particular, the book made me more aware of the differences between teaching how to recognize metaphors and respond to them critically, on the one hand, and teaching a more open-ended way of thinking via responding to poems, on the other. Metaphors occur far more pervasively than just in poetry, and poems don't reduce simply to metaphors, so these activities are complementary. Since most participants in my modules are non-native speakers of English and come from a variety of linguistic backgrounds, encouraging them as a group to get comfortable with poetry is a difficult task, but there were a number of poems in this book that seem suitable even for such an audience. If you're teaching students who are native in English, the selection of poems in the book may be that much more useful.

A few too many of the poems, perhaps, are about poetry, and a bit too much of the exposition asserts and argues that poetry can be helpful for business strategists rather than illustrating how. (Not for this book Ezra Pound's "Show, don't tell.") But the biggest drawback is the author's (CM's) self-indulgently "creative" style. She spends a lot of time telling us about her struggles writing the book, e.g.:

"Wittgenstein, I write. Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein. I make a list of the reasons Wittgenstein must feature [sic]:...." [@86]

and about the picturesque backdrops to her conference room pitches:

"Four o'clock on a hot June afternoon. The punts are moving lazily along the surface of the Cam, and there's hardly a ripple. At Cherry Hinton, in the deliberately utilitarian office of [her client], a fly is buzzing. I click to the next image in my PowerPoint presentation." [@96]

She makes frequent use of dramatic dialogue, e.g. at 192:

Maybe it is changing? I ask him.
He shrugs.
Maybe.

This is pushed to its most irritating extreme when CM engages with a couple of unnamed "readers," who are addressed with a passion and yearning usually reserved for lovers -- though also with a Zen pedantry that should be reserved, period:

_"Poetry leads us to the unstructured sources of our beings, to the unknown, and returns us to our structured, rational selves, refreshed."
Do you believe that?_ My reader's voice speaks that, just a whisper, quite close to my ear.
I put down the article by A.R. Ammons, whose work, up to now, I haven't been familiar with.
_"Poetry is a verbal means to a non-verbal source,"_ I whisper back, _"That's what Ammons says. It is a motion to no-motion, to the still point of contemplation and deep realization."_
There's a short silence, I can hear nothing but hiss and crackle, like the ether maybe, like listening to the airwaves. Eventually my reader comes back to me. His voice is small and distant.
_Given the context,_ he says, _I think that makes sense._ [@175-176].

The over-the-top quality of such exchanges -- the whispering, the dramatic pauses before the banal responses -- is more entertaining in small doses like this review than in a book of 200+ pages. I don't think most businesspeople, and especially ones who need to be convinced about the value of poetry, will tolerate it. So you might want to "waterski" over much of that stuff, to use an image from one of several poems whose full texts are printed twice in the book (Billy Connolly's "Introduction to Poetry," in this instance).

The reader might also raise an eyebrow at some of the author's interpretations, such as one in which she overlooks the primary meaning of "incandescent" (to glow from heat), which is very apposite in context, and suggests that it means "up in a big and blinding flurry of light and then gone again," @170. If that describes what happens to incandescent light bulbs in her home, she should have an electrician check the wiring. Occasionally CM's very British pronunciation may disconcert American readers, such as when she claims that "bra" rhymes with "are." Despite these smaller issues, the book could have been more effective had CM chosen a less "clever" and more conventional presentation. Even so, some of her observations are nonetheless interesting, and her selection of examples can be stimulating for people who teach humanities to business students and businesspeople.
I had the great privilege of reading an early copy of this book, and found it to be incredibly original, an extremely valuable approach to subjects that are tremendously relevant to our financial crisis challenged world. Within these pages, you'll find ideas that the business world needs to have much more woven into its fabric. The book arrives at a very fortuitous time.
Interesting concept. I am not a poetry guy.
but am an inventor, and this brings a lot to my way of thinking.
Helps me to think, one chocolate at a time
Recommended.