Lost: A Novel epub

by Alice Lichtenstein


Lost: A Novel epub

ISBN: 1439159823

ISBN13: 978-1439159828

Author: Alice Lichtenstein

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Scribner (March 9, 2010)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB book: 1485 kb

FB2 book: 1887 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 104

Other Formats: azw doc lrf lrf





Lost, by Alice Lichtenstein, is a beautiful, literary and profoundly poetic novel. It will appeal to anyone who has ever known or loved a person with Alzheimer's or has lost someone they loved.

Lost, by Alice Lichtenstein, is a beautiful, literary and profoundly poetic novel. The descriptions of loss and grief are profound and the book keeps on getting better with each page. The novel is told from the viewpoint of three people, each with a different story, whose lives become interconnected. The chapters are in the voices of different characters - Corey, Jeff, and Susan

Alice Lichtenstein graduated from Brown University and received her MFA from Boston University.

Alice Lichtenstein graduated from Brown University and received her MFA from Boston University. She has received a New York Foundation of the Arts Grant. Alice’s new novel, THE CRIME OF BEING, forthcoming from Upper Hand Press, November 2019, has already been called "A brilliant, riveting, and emotionally charged story about the crime of black life.

Alice Lichtenstein Lost. 17 April ·. Go granny, go!

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Also by Alice Lichtenstein. The Genius of the World. New York London Toronto Sydney.

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Lichtenstein is a historical novel by Wilhelm Hauff, first published in 1826, the year before his early death

Lichtenstein is a historical novel by Wilhelm Hauff, first published in 1826, the year before his early death. Set in and around Württemberg, it is considered his greatest literary success next to his fairy-tales, and, together with the work of the almost forgotten Benedikte Naubert, represents the beginning of historical novel-writing in Germany

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By Alice Lichtenstein. With eloquent, spare prose, Alice Lichtenstein paints a compelling portrait of the ways people become lost and found again

By Alice Lichtenstein. This reading group guide for Lost by Alice Lichtenstein includes an introduction, discussion questions, and ideas for enhancing your book club. We hope that these ideas will enrich your conversation and increase your enjoyment of the book. With eloquent, spare prose, Alice Lichtenstein paints a compelling portrait of the ways people become lost and found again. Questions for Discussion. 1. In the opening scene, Corey discovers Christopher’s body in the woods.

The book tells the story of a scientist living in New England whose husband is slipping deeper and deeper into Alzheimer's disease. One winter day, he disappears.

In 2006, Shape magazine named Lichtenstein one of ten "Women Who Shaped the World". Lichtenstein earned a . in nutrition from Cornell University, . in Nutrition from the Pennsylvania State University, and . in nutritional biochemistry from Harvard University. She completed her post-doctoral training at the Cardiovascular Institute, Boston University School of Medicine.

On a cold January morning Susan leaves her husband alone for a few minutes and returns to find him gone. Suffering from dementia, no longer able to dress or feed or wash himself, he has wandered alone into a frigid landscape with no sense of home or direction. Lost..

Over the course of one weekend, the massive search for her husband brings Susan together with Jeff, a search and rescue expert and social worker preoccupied with his young wife’s betrayal. In Jeff’s care is Corey, a mute eleven-year-old boy who has been abandoned by his family after accidentally setting a tragic fire. As the temperature drops and the search and rescue effort threatens to become one of search and recovery, they each confront haunting memories and difficult choices that will have an unexpected impact on their collective future. .

From the intersection of these three lives emerges an arresting portrait of the shifting terrain of marriage and the devastating effects of physical and psychological damage. Written in spare, beautiful prose, Lost explores the lengths we will go to take care of someone, and the ways in which responsibility, love, and sorrow can bind people together..

This is so well written and insightful. Explores loss, being lost and feeling lost. Hard to put down. One of those books that you will remember.
By the time you reach the end of Alice Lichtenstein's Lost , you realize that the path you thought you were following-- that of a rescue search in upstate New York in winter-- has taken you somewhere else. Skillfully and palpably realistic though it is in its depiction of the lives involved in the rescue search, Lost also builds to a mythic resonance and a wonderfully unexpected ending, as the tracker whose legs barely work, the scientist whose microscope cannot show her the way, and the boy whose fire is unquenchable learn to help one another through the wintry forest of their lives. Lost is a beautiful and remarkable work, deceptive in its seeming simplicity, filled with complexity, and offering the earned illumination of a perfect ending.
Lichtenstein makes trackers of us all; as we follow the journeys of her characters, we discover that their footsteps in the snow are also our own.
I loved this book. It is a stark book--a hard, beautiful book--which required me to wander away from myself into the landscape of grief and loss and fear, but which brought me home again, found, by reminding me of the importance of my connections with others, those hearts I can use as tracks toward home. This book also made me think about choices, and about isolation, and about how we love and lose and find each other again. It is like poetry, pointing beyond itself into what matters most. I fell in love with the characters. Read this book. Savor it. You won't be sorry.
I was terribly disappointed with `Lost,' which, at first, captivated me. In my opinion, the spell cast by author, Alice Lichtenstein, was too easily broken due to the excessive shifts in narrative. I found that there was something disquieting with these shifts - they were almost too abrupt. Therefore, I found myself staying quite a distance away from connecting with the characters and their narratives.

There are several main characters whose lives intersect. All of these characters are either lost, damaged and/or broken people. Rather than be distinct characters, in their own lives, too many of these characters [at least for me] did not appear terribly believable. I do not know why I felt this way, but I did. Christopher, a 70-ish year old architect, is suffering from dementia. He seemed the most real to me. His wife, Susan, a genius, is twelve years his junior. If one forgets how bright Susan is, not to worry. You will often be reminded of this. She is so intelligent that when fleeting `burn-out' occurs, Susan feels compelled to go for a quick walk. Christopher is left home alone, leaves this home and becomes lost.

Susan also manages to say something rather insulting to their son, Peter, just as he was leaving their home. There are some extremely tender moments between father and son. Peter did not deserve Susan's statement.

There is a search for Christopher. During this search the reader learns increasingly more about Jeff, as well as Corey.

`Lost' is over seasoned with the word `lost.'

I regret to state that this book simply did not resonate with me.
Lost, by Alice Lichtenstein, is a beautiful, literary and profoundly poetic novel. It will appeal to anyone who has ever known or loved a person with Alzheimer's or has lost someone they loved. The descriptions of loss and grief are profound and the book keeps on getting better with each page.

The novel is told from the viewpoint of three people, each with a different story, whose lives become interconnected. The chapters are in the voices of different characters - Corey, Jeff, and Susan.

Corey is an eleven year old boy who has been legally acquitted of setting a fire that destroyed his home and killed his older brother. Corey is fascinated with fires and during a game that he played with his brother, using cigarette lighters, his house burned down. It is difficult to find a placement for Corey in the foster system because of his history of fire starting. Currently, he is living with his grandparents but they are on the verge of kicking him out. Corey's grandmother can't sleep with Corey in the house because she is afraid of him. Corey has been mute since the fire and can not explain himself to others

Susan, 62 years old, is living with her husband of four decades, Christopher. Christopher is 72 years old and has rapidly progressing Alzheimer's disease. One morning, Susan goes for a short walk and when she returns, Christopher is gone, lost. She searches for him unsuccessfully so calls in the search and rescue team.

Jeff Herdman, 40 years old, is the liaison between the Susan and the searchers. He is a trained EMT who has served in Vietnam . Despite having Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, he functions well. He is helpful to Susan and encourages her to be hopeful. He is in the midst of his own marital crisis. His wife, Leeanne, 20 years his junior has left him for a younger man. During the day Jeff works as a caseworker for disturbed teenagers, primarily fire starters such as Corey, who is one of his clients.

The novel describes the pre-Alzheimer's relationship of Susan and Christopher. Their love is a deep one that has survived Christopher's disease. Susan cares for him gently and lovingly despite knowing that the Christopher she's loved is long gone. The book shows us the many ways that these two people have lived and loved for decades. Their strength is in the commitment and nourishment of one another. Both of them suffer profound grief at their losses. Susan worked as a microbiologist, specializing in newts and salamanders. Interestingly, they have regenerative brains which Susan wishes she could find a way to replicate in humans. Christopher worked as an architect. As his Alzheimer's worsened, Susan moved to another town because she felt shunned by their old friends who no longer came around or invited them out. Being around Christopher was too difficult for them.

Jeff's marriage to Leeanne is in a shambles. Leeanne is childlike in her emotional immaturity and is currently having an affair for which she apparently feels no guilt. During the search and rescue for Christopher, Leeanne gets a DUI and is jailed. It is obvious that she intends to leave Jeff.

Corey stumbles across Christopher lying dead in the woods but is too frightened to report this. He is fearful that he will be blamed for this death, too. When his grandparents tell him he is going to be kicked out of their home, he runs away, yet another victim for the search and rescue team.

Susan suspects from the beginning that Christopher is dead. As Jeff says to her, "In the rescue business there is rescue and there is recovery, which is ironic, Jeff thinks, because it's the recovery no one ever really recovers from". The book allows us to see inside the current and past histories of Jeff, Susan and Corey. We are privy to their rich emotional lives. By the time the book is finished, their relationships to one another have evolved and become much deeper and intense.

This is a book to read slowly, cherishing the beauty of the language. Lichtenstein writes with the soul of a poet. Her language is expressive, elegiac, and sensitive. We get to know the depth of the characters and are one with them, sharing their pain, hopes, and memories. The poignancy of the love and loss is beautifully described. With each page, the reader becomes more involved with the characters. By the end of the book, we are one with them.