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Holy Fire (Bantam Spectra Book) epub

by Bruce Sterling


Holy Fire (Bantam Spectra Book) epub

ISBN: 0553099582

ISBN13: 978-0553099584

Author: Bruce Sterling

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Spectra (October 2, 1996)

Pages: 326 pages

ePUB book: 1895 kb

FB2 book: 1770 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 359

Other Formats: mbr docx doc mobi





Series: Bantam Spectra Book. Paperback: 368 pages. Publisher: Spectra (October 1, 1997). THE GOOD Bruce Sterling truly writes sci-fi as "a literature of ideas. Holy Fire contains masterful ideas

Series: Bantam Spectra Book. Holy Fire contains masterful ideas. New technological embellishments crackle from every page in a world with an economy and a history that breathe. Sterling knows his future.

A Bantam Spectra Book. SPECTRA and the portrayal of a boxed S are trademarks of Bantam Books, a division of Random House, Inc, All rights reserved. Bantam Books are published by Bantam Books, a division of Random House, Inc. Its trademark, consisting of the words Bantam Books and the portrayal of a rooster, is Registered in . Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. Bantam Books, 1540 Broadway, New York, New York 10036. Other Books by This Author.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Holy Fire (Bantam Spectra Book) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Holy Fire is a 1996 science fiction novel by American writer Bruce Sterling. It was nominated for the British Science Fiction Award in 1996, and for both the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1997. Charles Stross has recommended it.

In Holy Fire, Bruce Sterling once again creates a unique and provocative future that deals with such . Poginant, lyrical, humorous, and often shocking, Holy Fire offers a hard unsparing look into a world that could become our own.

In Holy Fire, Bruce Sterling once again creates a unique and provocative future that deals with such timeless topics of the human condition as love, memory, science, politics, and the meaning of death.

Also from bantam spectra. Achilling look at a future in which 94 year-old Mia Ziemann realizes she has led a life without adventure and pleasure

Also from bantam spectra. A mind’s-eye view into the fast and hard-edged world of future technology. Achilling look at a future in which 94 year-old Mia Ziemann realizes she has led a life without adventure and pleasure. An experimental procedure restores heryouth, butthere are those who wish to erase hersecond life.

You can read book Holy Fire by Bruce Sterling in our library for absolutely free. For every life-extension treatment that was accepted for human use, there were hundreds of schemes that had never moved beyond the enormous tormented ranks of the animal models. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

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Holy Fire is a book made entirely of big ideas. A Bantam Spectra Book. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 00-29270

Holy Fire is a book made entirely of big ideas. An intellectual feat, it is also a treat for the spirit and the senses. A patented Sterling extra-special. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 00-29270. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

The 21st century is coming to a close, and the medical industrial complex dominates the world economy. It is a world of synthetic memory drugs, benevolent government surveillance, underground anarchists, and talking canine companions. Power is in the hands of conservative senior citizens who have watched their health and capital investments with equal care, gaining access to the latest advancements in life-extension technology. Meanwhile, the young live on the fringes of society, ekeing out a meagre survival on free, government-issued rations and a black market in stolen technological gadgetry from an earlier, less sophisticated age.Mia Ziemann is a 94-year-old medical economist who enjoys all the benefits of her position. But a deathbed visit with a long-ago ex-lover and a chance meeting with a young bohemian dress-designer brings Mia to an awful revelation. She has lived her life with such caution that it has been totally bereft ofpleasure and adventure. She has one chance to do it all over. But first she must submit herself to a radical--and painful--experimental procedure whichpromises to make her young again. The procedure is not without risk and her second chance at life will not come without a price. But first she will have toescape her team of medical keepers.Hitching a ride on a plane to Europe, Mia sets out on a wild intercontinental quest in search of spiritual gratification, erotic revelation, and the thing she missed most of all: the holy fire of the creative experience. She joins a group of outlaw anarchists whose leader may be the man of her dreams...or her undoing.  Worst of all, Mia will have to undergo one last radical procedure that could cost her a second life.In Holy Fire, Bruce Sterling once again creates a unique and provocative future that deals with such timeless topics of the human condition as love,memory, science, politics, and the meaning of death. Poginant, lyrical, humorous, and often shocking, Holy Fire offers a hard unsparing look into a world that could become our own.From the Paperback edition.
"Youth is wasted on the young," Shaw said, and this is a book about that. In a future world where life extension is easily available, and where old people rule absolutely, an old and disillusioned woman goes for radical rejuvenation therapy and emerges a young, impulsive, completely different person. She runs for it, disappearing from the medical monitors and health care engineers to make a brand new, and completely different, life for herself in Europe as a beautiful young runaway. It's an alternately wacky and moving story about youth vs. age, about art and culture, and about desire and passion. But the reason to read this book is Sterling's ability to bring it to vibrant life. Every page is a giddy joy in itself, as you become caught up in the fevered excitement of someone making new discoveries after a lifetime of tedious conformity, and learns things about life that neither the young nor the old know.
In a post-plague world, the medical establishment has fused with the government to extend the lives of the most useful, practical and healthy of its citizens. Mia Zimmerman is truly one of these: a gerontocrat. But when a surgery strips off her skin and remakes her brain and body molecule-by-molecule, she is reborn: young again. And it turns out the new Mia craves the youth she never had. Among the druggies and fashion addicts who throw their lives away, the dead-at-forty who resent the rule of the old, by the old, she sees her world from another perspective. Brilliant with age's wisdom and vivid with youth, Mia will find her way up from nothing. Unless the medical establishment can find her and reclaim their investment...

THE GOOD
Bruce Sterling truly writes sci-fi as "a literature of ideas." Holy Fire contains masterful ideas. New technological embellishments crackle from every page in a world with an economy and a history that breathe. Sterling knows his future.

THE BAD
The plot slows about midway through, and the characters lack the vivacity of Sterling's ideas. In the end all the characters show up rather suddenly to opine in various ways, which is great for the book's ideas.
The best Sterling EVER. Only flaw is that it was edited down to a sketch of what it could have been. Well maybe then it would have been an overly-long-and-in-need-of-editing Neal Stephenson book. ;) I take it back. Holy Fire was perfect in so many ways. But there were a few loose and undeveloped threads that could have been more developed ... Like what was Holy Fire...really. Holy Fire seemed to imply more than just having a competence to take your place in the world...yet that is all I can glean that it really meant in this book. The title of the book should have had something to do with the plot and theme of the book dontcha think? ...Not just be another throwaway bit of show offy prose. So many amazing ideas and glimpses of the near future that would have been enough in themselves for many writers to pursue in a book. For Sterling it is merely texture. What a painter of texture... a plot may lack ... but the texture is worth the read. What a world we may have to look forward to if only a bit of his vision comes true. The youth Maya hangs with in Europe, so facile with technology yet under employed and yet to find a place in the world, are great metaphor for the disempowered youth of today who showed us their plight in the Occupy Movement recently. Loved the view of the future Art and Fashion worlds and the world of Artifice...neither Art nor Science. Loved the Artspeak and philosophizing about reality vs. artifice. Thought provoking.
What happens if you can truly be young again? Not just live forever, but become young again. Mia is 94 and has taken excellent care of herself. That actually brings up another aspect of the book that I thought was fascinating. In this end of the 21st century dystopia, health care depends on how well you take care of yourself. If you stay fit, eat right, and take your vitamins you get top notch health care. If you choose to smoke and drink and eat lots of jelly donuts then you get less optimal care. It's definitely counter-intuitive, and feels wrong on one level, it also appeals on another level to our sense of personal responsibility. Anyway, Mia gets access to new, cutting-edge technology to make herself truly young again. Once restored to youth, she starts re-examining her life and her choices. It's a great book and a gave me a LOT to think about. Enjoy!
This and Schismatrix are as good as sci-fi gets. Sterling is a master of writing characters with rich internal lives, that act because they feel and not because it advances some inexorable plot. Sterling’s posthumans are deeply, achingly human, even if the worlds they inhabit are unrecognizable in some regards.
The exponential growth of spending on health care finds its logical conclusion 100 years from now in a struggle between the elderly rich whose lives have been extended and their children who are powerless yet sense the prospect of human immortality.
Better than your typical sci-fi but not as good as the average Bruce sterling
A book about an old woman who becomes a young woman. Talking dogs (could have been fascinating, but mostly just abused props). So many possibilities for conflict, all lost in the telling. Mia (or Maya - I never did figure that one out) unfortunately loses all memory of her old self when she becomes young. So no conflict regarding old desires vs. new desires. No intergenerational conflict. Instead, she becomes some kind of party girl, hanging out with the rich and famous in Europe, and even becomes a supermodel. Give me a break. The author completely squandered his opportunity to tell a real story and make this character come to life. Instead, she lives out a male author's imagining of what every woman wants. Popularity! Youth! Beauty! To be a supermodel! He tried to throw in some "real" problems, like bad hair. Mia/Maya was a flat, cardboard stereotype. Save your time/money on this one.