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Count Bohemond epub

by Alfred Duggan


Count Bohemond epub

ISBN: 0712608435

ISBN13: 978-0712608435

Author: Alfred Duggan

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Trafalgar Square (August 29, 1985)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB book: 1445 kb

FB2 book: 1470 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 209

Other Formats: lit doc lrf mbr





by. Duggan, Alfred Leo, 1903-1964.

by. Bohemond I, Prince of Antioch, 1058?-1111. New York, Pantheon Books.

Count Bohemond was a Norman adventurer. History records his meteoric progress from junior member of a Norman warlord's household in Sicily to his conquests in the Middle East. Alfred Duggan's historical novel reveals how Count Bohemond challenged the Byzantine Empire, first defeating then allying himself with the wily Emperor Alexius. And how Bohemond outwits the high-born, wealthy Crusader leaders who would have led the Crusade to disaster. History records his meteoric progress from junior member of a Norman warlord's household in Sicily to his conquests in the Middle East

Count Bohemond was a Norman adventurer. Alfred Duggan's historical novel reveals how Count Bohemond challenged the Byzantine Empire.

Essentially, Alfred Duggan’s Count Bohemond is a novelization of Steven Runciman’s first volume in his A History of the Crusades. Truth be told, there are parts of Prof. Runciman’s classic that read like a novel.

Alfred Duggan (1903–1964) was an English historian and archaeologist, and a bestselling historical novelist in the 1950s. Though brought up in Britain, he had been born Alfredo León Duggan in Lomas de Zamora Buenos Aires, Argentina to a family of wealthy landowners of Irish descent

Count Bohemond was a Norman adventurer

Count Bohemond was an actual Norman warrior who carved out his own kingdom in the Middle East-as well as the hero of this compelling novel. History records his meteoric rise from junior member of a Sicilian warlord's house to conquerer. Along the way, Bohemond challenged the Byzantine Empire and outwitted Crusader leaders. And how Bohemond outwits the high born, wealthy Crusader leaders who would have led the Crusade to disaster

Count Bohemond (Cassell Military Paperbacks) by Duggan, Alfred Paperback Book.

Count Bohemond (Cassell Military Paperbacks) by Duggan, Alfred Paperback Book. Was: Previous price£6. 1 new & refurbished from £9. 9. The Little Emperors(Paperback Book)Alfred Duggan-2005-VG.

Alfred Duggan kept a car while at Oxford, one of the few students with sufficient funding . At the age of forty-seven he published his first book.

Alfred Duggan kept a car while at Oxford, one of the few students with sufficient funding and influence to do so; the University Statutes prohibited undergraduate members of the University from keeping a car within a certain distance of the town centre at Carfax, so Duggan kept his vehicle, an early Rolls-Royce, just outside the limit of the jurisdiction of the University. In an introduction to Duggan's novel Count Bohemond (1964), Evelyn Waugh said Duggan's "literary style remained constant. There is no groping in Alfred's work.

Find this Pin and more on Historical Fiction by Kidaoo Book Summaries. Count Bohemond by Alfred Duggan - Orion Publishing Co - ISBN 10 0304362735 - ISBN 13 0304362735 - Count Bohemond was a Norman adventurer. Saved by. Kidaoo Book Summaries. Find this Pin and more on books by Dee . Find this Pin and more on Books by Mary Anne. Monsoon (The Courtneys) by Wilbur Smith, More information.

Duggan was a sort of late Edwardian conservative who more or less wrote his books for boys, as I gather things (I first read of him in Derbyshire's review for the New Criterion). Supposedly, this isn't Duggan's best work; hard for me to tell, as it is the first I read.
Where it fails: Duggan's Normans seem to be standard issue British stuffed shirts; the type of fellows who might fit into a Jeeves and Wooster book, with occasional nods towards their "greedy Norman natures." Bohemond himself is intensely old school British, as is his dad, Robert Guiscard; historical personages I'm well acquainted with from the primary and secondary literature. These fellows were anything but the type of chappish fellow they're portrayed as: in real life they were colorful bloodthirsty brigandish fellows. Similar comments apply to Sichelgaita, who appears like one of Bertie Wooster's fearsome aunts ... I suppose that's the type of character a 1950s British boy could understand and relate to, but the real Sichelgaita was something more akin to a cross between a Valkyrie and a gangster. The Byzantines aren't really given their due either, and get chappish characterizations as, more or less, "dirty foreign snail eaters." None of these characters make much sense, as British chaps and their virago aunts don't tend to do things like go on multi-year campaigns to conquer the Holy Land.
The story itself is a rollicking good one. The Normans of that era were stupendous warriors, and their cultural achievements helped form modern Europe. The events recounted in the book were, well, Byzantine, and Duggan does a good job of conveying the events as they unfolded. The pace can be a little slow and dry, but the descriptions of camp life and battle were lively and amusing. If you remember this is a sort of lad's book of a certain era, it's quite enjoyable. It's not Historical Fiction of the caliber of Robert Graves "I, Claudius," but there isn't enough written about the Normans of that era, and it does amuse and inform.
First, the beginning was great. As long as Bohemond was in Europe, I loved it. The battles were short, swift and very believable. It began to drag, however, once Bohemond reached the Eastern Roman capital. To be honest, I didn't finish the book. What I loved that Duggan did right was give you the feel that the characters thought as people did back then. That's why I gave it four stars. His people feel historic, and that's a tough thing to do well.
If you are a fan of Crusader history you'll love the book. Accurately follows the history of the first crusade bringing the reader into the period.
Alfred Duggan is my favourite historical novelist and whilst Count Bohemond is to my mind not his best, that award goes to Elephants and Castles, which is sadly not in print, it was the first novel of his which I read. Having read it, I then read every thing of his I could get my hands on. What Duggan does better than any other historical novelist is make the people in his novels recognisable as real people whilst still setting them firmly in their own times, be that ancient Rome, Saxon England or the crusades.

True to the real history of the times, Count Bohemond is the story of one of the commanders of the first crusade, a Norman warlord from Southern Italy who was frankly was out to carve for himself a Kingdom out of the lands taken from the Muslim rulers of the Middle East. Serving God coming a long way behind his ruthless ambition.

Duggan's discription of battles, particularly when those battles go wrong and they often do, is second to none. Although I think Founding Fathers, Elephants and Castles and Lady for Ramsom are better than Count Bohemond, all of Duggan's books are worth reading and Count Bohemond will not let you down.
Set in the First Crusade this book brings to life the Early Middle Ages and the adventure of the First Crusade. Bohemond as a Norman from Italy already has a strong distrust of the Byzantines. His interesting portrayal of the event from a participants point of view gives us a glimpse of other motivations for the crusaders, other than religious.
The desperate struggle around Antioch when the crusaders are heavily outnumbered and without food or hope is brilliant and gives us insight into just how close run the whole crusade was. The description of the sieges and battles are fantastic. I have enjoyed many of Alfred Duggan's books, but to me this is the best!