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The Wildfire Season epub

by Andrew Pyper


The Wildfire Season epub

ISBN: 0007193696

ISBN13: 978-0007193691

Author: Andrew Pyper

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: HarperCollins (2005)

Pages: 400 pages

ePUB book: 1689 kb

FB2 book: 1763 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 912

Other Formats: doc txt lrf mbr





Andrew Pyper The Wildfire Season

Andrew Pyper The Wildfire Season. What hurt her more than his rejection was the extent to which he was wrong about what she was asking of him. Mercy had nothing to do with it. It’s true that she wanted to bring them together, if only for a time, as the open talk that they used to find so natural had deserted them. But her desire was real. On this night, though, it is Miles who reaches for Alex. Aware of the sound of their own breathing, each clinging to the cold edge of their opposite bedsides, he had rolled over to bring his lips to her shoulder.

The Wildfire Season is storytelling at its very best. A blockbuster work of storytelling that drives relentlessly to its heart-stopping conclusion, The Wildfire Season is a dark psychological thriller, a visceral adventure and an unusual, and unusually moving, love story

The Wildfire Season is storytelling at its very best. A blockbuster work of storytelling that drives relentlessly to its heart-stopping conclusion, The Wildfire Season is a dark psychological thriller, a visceral adventure and an unusual, and unusually moving, love story. It is also a lyrical exploration of our most raw emotional truths, of what ultimately binds us to family, to conscience, to what remains of the natural world. The Wildfire Season is storytelling at its very best.

Flapping from spruce top to squirrel’s nest, nodding at his progress. Miles reminds himself to be grateful that, so far, the raven is silent. sts on tagging along to wish him. sts on tagging along to wish him the worst, he would prefer if it would at least keep its mouth shut until noon.

The Wildfire Season: Chosen as a Best Book by The Globe and Mail, The Vancouver Sun and The Calgary Herald in 2005

The Wildfire Season: Chosen as a Best Book by The Globe and Mail, The Vancouver Sun and The Calgary Herald in 2005. The Killing Circle: Shortlisted for the 2009 Evergreen Award and the RUSA (Reference and User Services Association) 2009 Reading List award and was selected by The New York Times for its Notable Crime Fiction list of 2008.

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The Wildfire Season is a remarkable tour de force – an edgy psychological thriller, a supernatural chiller, a terrifying tale of untamed nature and a poignant love story. For fire-fighter Miles McEwan, scarred and haunted by a terrible death, it is both. The Wildfire Season - Andrew Pyper.

After half his body was burned in a forest fire, Miles McEwan left his life behind and moved to the most remote place he could find, a little village in the Yukon called Ross River

After half his body was burned in a forest fire, Miles McEwan left his life behind and moved to the most remote place he could find, a little village in the Yukon called Ross River. I bought this book thinking it was not a novel. The story line keeps you interested and you really feel for the characters.

I love Andrew Pyper. That’s why I bought this book. I would give it 5 stars because it was very good, but it was about bears and that took some getting used to. If you like bears, Fires, and Canada? 10 STARS!
Very entertaining novel focusing more on the mental turmoils of the characters than the wildfire. Provides some awakening insight to the life for those of the deep North woods and forest firefighting. Pyper has a pure talent for detailing the sensory and mind-twisting of his characters. Excellent read.
Good story. Good author . This guy has a unique style this story was good but Demonoligist is his best
This novel was a surprise, what I expected in a well-plotted mystery enhanced by the basic themes of human and nature, betrayal, tragedy, redemption and the unpredictability of a forest fire on the rampage, a small flame simmering over a landscape, eventually dancing from tree to tree in a remote area of Yukon wilderness. Caught in the fire, the inhabitants of Ross River will face the fury of an out-of-control burn, their intimate personal struggles laid bare in a stunning denouement. From the first, from the eager, hungry tongues of flame that nibble on the dry branches, subdued by nighttime damp, to the electric atmosphere of the local bar, where a group of outcasts establish an uneasy peace, this story is fueled on raw energy, jealousy and rage, the tensions building as surely as the teasing blaze that twirls along the edges of its intent.

Lead firefighter Miles McEwan has finally retreated to the furthest corner of the world where he can exist on a minimum of commitment, his body half-clear, half-scarred by a fire that almost took his life along with his future. Marriage plans with Alex abruptly shattered by a psyche damaged as deeply inside as outside, Miles chose to run from a situation that overwhelmed him. Now, five years later, the smoky gloom of the bar is severed by a slice of sunlight and the entrance of a woman and a little girl, hand in hand. After five summers of searching, Alex has found Miles, come for her day of reckoning, their daughter's hand held in her fierce grip. Miles realizes the time has come to face the consequences of what he thought was pride, but is really cowardice, at least in Alex's eyes.

In this place, at this time, everything comes together, a long-time feud between a local guide, Wade, and Miles. Wade and Miles are eerily similar, except one has crossed the boundaries of a Faustian bargain, the other not yet committed to a soulless existence. As Alex bravely confronts Miles, purified by her anger, Rachel, her daughter, touches Miles' scarred face lovingly; elsewhere, a grizzly sow and her pups are trapped by Wade and his partner's wealthy hunter, setting yet another critical element of the drama in motion. Miles searches desperately for redemption, for one more chance as the ferocity of nature threatens, the world made small in a battle to survive the flames one more time. In wonderful, insightful prose, Pyper delivers on every count, man against nature and a formidable enemy to find his finer self. Luan Gaines/2008.
Andrew Pyper is the author of Lost Girls. His current title, The Wildfire Season, was chosen "Best Book of the Year" by three Canadian newspapers.

In trying to escape his past, loner Miles McEwan settled in Ross River, Canada, following a fire that burned his body and scarred his soul. Leaving his former life meant giving up a medical career and the love of his life.

Miles's five years of respite from the world is about to end. It's the wildfire season in the Yukon. A fire is ignited and as a result, the lives of strangers intersect--Miles's former lover, Alex, and her five-year-old daughter--and bear hunters. Someone is planning and carrying out murder!

Andrew Pyper is a writer to watch. His prose is taut, his stories complex and exciting and his characters fully developed. He deftly handles the psychological issues of Miles, understands Alex, and seems to have knowledge about animal life and mixes is all up with the brutality of a wildfire.

Armchair Interviews says: You'll have a difficult time putting this novel down.
This novel deserves a wider audience. Sort of a thriller combined with an action-adventure-wilderness story, the novel is a welcome change from the cliched plots that pepper both genres. Although the story is a wild ride (the race to escape the rapidly spreading fire, not to mention the angry grizzly and the guy with the gun, is intense and memorable), the novel's strength comes from its well-developed characters and their interactions. The principle characters are all flawed or broken or both, and their issues are just as compelling as the wildfire that threatens them. Few novels succeed so well in blending the "story first" sensibility of genre fiction and the "character first" sensibility that drives mainstream fiction.
Miles McEwan moved to literally the end of the road when he relocated to Ross River in the Yukon to become the tiny hamlet's fire chief as he hides from his past though he cannot elude the fiery burn scars that mark and mock his face. Though he drinks a lot to somewhat bury his mental anguish that haunts him, Miles is also aware that he must remain somewhat sober as this is the area's inferno season when forest fires tend to go out of control.

However, this particular season is going be even more chaotic than any Miles can remember. His angry bitter former lover Alex and their five-year-old daughter Rachel have arrived in town; he does not want to see them because they would see him and what has become of him. There is also a bear hunting expedition that is foolish at a time when several fires nearby are blazing. When these separate conflagrations consolidate, the town is endangered. While Miles is distracted by his ex and the inferno, someone sees an opportunity to use the grizzly hunters and the fires to commit murder.

THE WILDFIRE SEASON is a terrific descriptive look at the dangers of the wilderness used as great background to a fine thriller. The fire scenes are superbly described so that the audience will feel the heat and peril facing heroes. Miles is a solid protagonist who wants no human contact except for his bartender serving him drinks, his firefighting team only in an official capacity, and rescues. The murder subplot augments a tense graphic tale that hooks readers from start to finish.

Harriet Klausner