One Last Look epub

by Susanna Moore


One Last Look epub

ISBN: 1400075416

ISBN13: 978-1400075416

Author: Susanna Moore

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (October 12, 2004)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB book: 1994 kb

FB2 book: 1233 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 928

Other Formats: doc docx lrf mbr





One Last Look" is loosely based on the lives of a real governor-general and his sisters who went out to India in 1836 to serve the British Empire.

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). One Last Look" is loosely based on the lives of a real governor-general and his sisters who went out to India in 1836 to serve the British Empire. The diary is fictional and spans seven years, but primary sources for the narrative are the published writings of sisters Emily and Fanny Eden, who accompanied their brother George, Earl of Auckland, when he was sent to Calcutta as Governor General.

More about Susanna Moore.

Susanna Moore is the author of the novels The Big Girls, One Last Look, In the Cut, Sleeping Beauties, The Whiteness of Bones, My Old Sweetheart, and a book of nonfiction, I Myself Have Seen It. She lives in New York City. Also by susanna moore. The Whiteness of Bones.

One Last Look, Susanna Moore's tale of colonial India, is elegantly written but fails to convince Natasha Walter. One Last Look is a strange departure for Susanna Moore. Next to that novel and its urgent engagement with a contemporary city and sensibility, this feels a little like a holiday.

One Last Look Moore, Susanna Random House (USA) 9781400075416 : After several wretched months at sea, Eleanor Oliphant arrives in Calcutta with her brother . One Last Look, Moore, Susanna. Варианты приобретения. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует.

One Last Look Moore, Susanna Random House (USA) 9781400075416 : After several wretched months at sea, Eleanor Oliphant arrives in Calcutta with her brother Henry and sister Harriet. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 10 янв 2020 Ориентировочная дата поставки: Середина Февраля При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

Colonial administrators - Family relationships - Fiction. Brothers and sisters - Fiction. British - India - Fiction. Women - India - Fiction. India - History - British occupation, 1765-1947 - Fiction. Calcutta (India) - Fiction. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 21, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

After all, everyone gets ric Susanna Moore used the letters and diaries of three Englishwomen in India at the time of the Great Game with Russia as basis for this novel, sometimes using their actual words. The result is a sly, funny, sad, and moving story of transformation and Empire. Eleanor Oliphant, her sister, and cousin, accompany her brother to India in 1836.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. Calcutta in 1836: an uneasy mix of two worldsthe patient, implacably unchangeable India and the tableau vivant of English life created of imperialisms desperation. This is where Lady Eleanor, her sister Harriet,. This is where Lady Eleanor, her sister Harriet, and her brother, Henrythe newly appointed Governor-General of the colonyarrive after a harrowing sea journey from Heaven, across the world, to Hell. But none of them will find India hellish in anticipated ways, and someincluding Harriet and, against her better judgment, Eleanorwill find an irresistible and endlessly confounding heaven.

One Last Look’ is written in the form of journal entries. The author says that she had read many books set during the period in which the story is set (middle 1830s to early 1840s) and she was also inspired by the journals and private papers of Emily Eden, Fanny Eden and Fanny Parkes. In the acknowledgements page, she even says in some instances, I have taken the great liberty of using their own words.

Moore's (In the Cut, 1995, et. fictionalized journal, based on actual published diaries, of life among the Raj in the . fictionalized journal, based on actual published diaries, of life among the Raj in the 1830s and '40s depicts the convoluted relationship of the British to their Indian subjects. Pub Date: Oct. 6th, 2003.

After several wretched months at sea, Eleanor Oliphant arrives in Calcutta with her brother Henry and sister Harriet. It is 1836, and her beloved Henry has just been appointed England’s new Governor-General for India. Eleanor is to be his official hostess.Despite the imported English gowns and formal soir?es, India makes a mockery of Eleanor’s sensibilities. Burning heat, starving people, insects as big as eggs–it is all an unreal dream, rife with tumultuous life. Harriet gives herself over to the adventure. Henry busies himself with official duties. Eleanor, though groping for bearings, slowly finds her isolation punctuated by moments of elation: her first monsoon, graceful women in vibrant sarees, Benares rising out of the mist. She discovers she likes curries and her native servants; and often dislikes her compatriots. Over the course of six years and a trek from Calcutta to Kabul and back, India manages to unsettle all of her “old, old ideas.”
When Lord Henry Oliphant is appointed Governor-General to India in 1836, his devoted sister, Lady Eleanor Oliphant, a 34 year-old spinster, agrees to accompany him as does Harriet, their artistic younger sibling, and also their cousin Lafayette, a lady's man and a libertine. Lady Eleanor keeps a journal in which she recounts the significant events that occur over the six year period they spend on the subcontinent, as well as the more personal changes in character and points of view.

Susanna Moore, a superb writer, brings vividly to life the grandeur, beauty and squalor that was India - a place so far removed from anything the Oliphant's had previously experienced as to be totally unimaginable. The small group of family members arrive in the country, like so many before them, with great confidence in the superiority of their British aristocratic heritage and their right to rule. Each is to change slowly over the years, and as they become accustomed to the heat, the brilliant local color, the extremes of wealth and poverty, the claustrophobic inbred social life, each one grows to love India, and all are transformed.

Elegantly written and well researched, Ms. Moore recreates with great accuracy the language and experiences of an English lady living in early 19th century India. "One Last Look" is loosely based on the lives of a real governor-general and his sisters who went out to India in 1836 to serve the British Empire. The diary is fictional and spans seven years, but primary sources for the narrative are the published writings of sisters Emily and Fanny Eden, who accompanied their brother George, Earl of Auckland, when he was sent to Calcutta as Governor General. The author also consulted the diaries of another period traveler and contemporary of the Edens, the wife of a civil servant, described by Moore as "the sublime Fanny Parks."

Governor Oliphant's reign has been largely unsuccessful. Hoping for support in his quest to win Afghanistan for Britain, he undertakes the "Great Progress" in 1937, a two-and-a-half-year journey from Calcutta to Kabul to cement an alliance with the Maharajah Ranjit Singh, an old warlord. Accompanied by a huge retinue of 12,000 people, Lady Eleanor asks: "Why must we travel with scribes, equerries, victualers, cooks, officers with their wives and children and parrots and spaniels, tent pitchers, herdsmen, syces, grass cutters, musicians, dancing girls, water bearers, butchers, sweepers, tailors, valets, hairdressers, the Bombay Troop, the queen's 12th Regiment, the Irish guards and 2,000 native archers?" Because everything is a big production in India. Much of the author's extraordinary descriptions of this dramatic trip is taken directly from the journals of Emily Eden.

Eleanor, Harriet and the "sublime Fanny" were adventurous, spirited women, who opened to their new bicultural experience and thrived. "The danger of this place is that I am learning to deny myself nothing," writes Eleanor. And, "My life - once a fastidious nibble - has now turned into an endless disorderly feast." These women were far different from the memsahibs who came later to India in the early 20th century. The staid latecomers felt it necessary to enforce their hierarchical society, and to maintain English dress, customs and culture, rather than to adapt more and to enjoy.

"One Last Look" is an atmospheric novel, the action is character driven, the conflicts internal. With richly textured, lush prose, Susanna Moore evokes a most exotic world, a time long past, and characters forever transformed. Highly recommended.

JANA
This is a fine example of a book that is both based on research, and imaginary context. I was first taken by Moore's depictions of life at sea in the opening pages, making me think of a book that I had read many years ago, An Imaginary Life, by David Malouf. Both, tell us about a way of life that goes beyond what even the seasoned traveler, one who has been to the open Savannas, or, as far as Katmandu, takes for granted about the immediate context of todays world and our current way of life. One last Look is an evocation of the sensually exotic, and there is something about its texture that wafts through the pages as luxurious and heady as the scent of Hermes' Un Jardin Apres La Mousson. Both imaginary tales take us on a journey that one could call spiritual, awakening, hard, filled with meaning, and about personal enlightenment. Moore's tale tweaks our desire to look into the past through a personal lens that is both naive and hopeful. I would highly recommend this book for anyone who loves adventure and is a lover of exotic sojourns.
If you have not been to India, this book will, alas, mean less.Horrible to read (racism, savagery, curelty to animals), but also fascinating and beautiful (naturalist wonders, exotic animals and plants, gorgeous scenery). A book filled with the unpredictable as well as predictable characters of the British Empire amid the strange oddities of India. But what is astonishing is the depth of detail (Moore researched this with love for years). The main characters, the Brother and two Sisters and their servants, are so well drawn it is hard to say goodbye at the end. And the subtlety of how the various sexual relations is handled is marvelous (what exactly is going on between the brother and sister?). Anyway, I was surprised at the excellence of the desciptions of the 4 month sea voyage to get there (awful experience), the gardens and peculiar customs, the food, the dress, the superstition, the architecture - - everything drawn in painstaking detail and reads like an adventure page-turner. I loved it.
Such rich subject matter is rendered rather inert and lifeless in this book. It was very oblique in establishing relationships and what was going on I had to Google a few reviews of the book to figure out what was going on. It was not worth the read.