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To Make Men Free: A Novel of the Battle of Antietam epub

by Richard Croker


To Make Men Free: A Novel of the Battle of Antietam epub

ISBN: 0060858362

ISBN13: 978-0060858360

Author: Richard Croker

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: HarperTorch (February 1, 2006)

ePUB book: 1581 kb

FB2 book: 1166 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 269

Other Formats: doc txt lit mbr





Includes an excerpt from "No greater courage. Includes bibliographical references (page 471). Flat treason, by God" - Where is Stonewall? -. "Oh, my God, lay me down" - Total absence of brains - Most ragged, lean.

Includes an excerpt from "No greater courage. "Oh, my God, lay me down" - Total absence of brains - Most ragged, lean and hungry set of wolves - Let the damned Yankees come to us - Piece of paper - Deserted by all the world - Line of battle is formed - Cornfield -"My God, we must get out of this".

To Make Men Free book. Historical novel about the Civil War battles of Antietam. He added dialogue which increased the readability.

To Make Men Free: A Novel of Antietam. You might especially appreciate the book’s attention to the political implications of this historic battle.

To Make Men Free moves freely among the Oval Office, the generals' field headquarters, and the campfire . It is about one of the most fascinating battles in American history, the Battle of Antietam. The title comes from a verse to The Battle Hymn of the Republic: "As.

To Make Men Free moves freely among the Oval Office, the generals' field headquarters, and the campfire, weaving all three aspects into one remarkable narrative.

A Novel of the Battle of Antietam .

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On September 17, 1862, in Sharpsburg, Maryland, more than 23,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were killed or wounded, making the Battle of Antietam the bloodiest day in American history

On September 17, 1862, in Sharpsburg, Maryland, more than 23,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were killed or wounded, making the Battle of Antietam the bloodiest day in American history. Robert E. Lee must act as a general when his youngest son pleads not to be sent "back in there. Confederate General A. P. Hill arrives on the field at the last possible moment with something to prove to his former West Point roommate, Union General George McClellan, while Abraham Lincoln desperately struggles with the issue of emancipation of the slaves. George Smalley stood on the aft deck of the ferry and looked back at the most beautiful sight in the world: New York City growing continually smaller. Published March 1, 2005 by Harper Paperbacks. In library, Antietam, Battle of, M. 1862, Maryland Civil War, 1861-1865, Fiction, United States Civil War, 1861-1865, Protected DAISY, History. Maryland, United States. Published January 31, 2006 by HarperTorch.

A fictional account of the bloody Civil War battle of September 1862 brings together the characters of Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, Abraham Lincoln, and others, re-creating the events that turned the tide in favor of northern forces and cleared the path for the Emancipation Proclamation. Reprint.
Great book on History.
I thoroughly enjoyed this novel; one based on historical happenings. I have read others by this author and I do especially appreciate his thoroughness and manner of presenting a setting or happening.
Keeps you spell bound. Better understanding of how the war was fought and the devastation stupid generals created. Very graphic war scenes with the writing.
This book isn't really much of a novel. The author doesn't stray far at all from the historical record in any meaningful manner, and unlike (for instance) the Killer Angels, he doesn't concentrate on one portion of the battle and ignore the others. Instead, Croker recounts pretty much every aspect of the Battle of Antietam, constructing what's not a formal historical account, but a pretty accurate narrative of what happened in novel form. While I don't dislike this, it's hard to call it either a novel or a history.

Antietam was an especially bloody, frustrating battle. The book spends considerable time building up to the battle (fighting doesn't start until just about halfway through the book). All of the various incidents that occurred during the course of the fighting, from the captured Union officer who was duty-bound not to warn his colleagues about a Rebel ambush, and couldn't quite bring himself to refrain from doing so anyway, to the famed Lost Order, Longstreet in his carpet slippers, and so forth, everything is carefully recounted, and the result is very satisfying, though of course by the end of it you'll want to strangle McClellan. One annoyance is the lack of good maps.

I enjoyed this book, and would say that it could almost serve as a substitute for a historical account, if you're not going to school or something.
This is a novel in the style of The Killer Angels. It is about one of the most fascinating battles in American history, the Battle of Antietam. The title comes from a verse to The Battle Hymn of the Republic: "As [Christ] died to make men holy, let us die to make men free." The emphasis on death and freedom is entirely appropriate in that it was the Union's marginal victory at Antietam that allowed Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation thus taking the first actual step toward freeing the slaves. But this was at a cost. September 17, 1862 remains the bloodiest day in American history. More Americans died at Antietam than on D Day, or at Pearl Harbor, or on September 11. (Some early casualty estimates of September 11 suggested that Antietam's toll had finally been exceeded but more accurate later figures prove that Antietam still holds the record.) And the population at that time was a small fraction of today's population.
Most Civil War battles, at least most single day Civil War battles, have a single location, a peach orchard or a sunken road, where the fighting was most intense and the bodies dropped liked dominos. Antietam has three: Miller's cornfield in the north, the sunken road forever after known as Bloody Lane in the middle, and the Rohrbach Bridge, forever after known as the Burnside Bridge to the south. The battle also features some of the most fascinating characters in American history; Lee, Stonewall Jackson, Ambrose Burnside, Joe Hooker, and George McClellan.
McClellan, the Union commander, is particularly fascinating. This thirty-four year old had the supreme self confidence that only his belief that he was preordained by God to save the Union could convey. He also possessed massive amounts of paranoia that caused him to treat better men than himself with contempt, most notably Abraham Lincoln whom he routinely referred to as a baboon. McClellan had three reasons that he should have overwhelmingly crushed Lee and ended the war: He had massive numerical superiority approaching three to one, a stroke of luck placed a copy of Lee's plans into his hands at just the moment he could best use them, and Lee's troops were spread out such that McClellan could defeat them in detail. But McClellan squandered all of these advantages and barely avoided defeat. Despite the reality, McClellan believed that it was he who was massively out numbered. Despite knowledge of Lee's plans, he failed to move quickly enough to truly capitalize on this unique opportunity. When the actual shooting started, McClellan committed his troops piecemeal rather than launching coordinated attacks and thus was himself nearly defeated in detail. (Simulations of this battle from my cardboard counter days through Sid Meier's Antietam all require that only certain Union troops be available or activated at any given time. Otherwise, the Confederate player would not stand a chance. McClellan himself, of course, was not so restricted and could have launched coordinated attacks using overwhelming force simultaneously.) McClellan subsequently ran as a peace Democrat for president against Lincoln in 1864 in one of the most bitterly contested elections in American history.
If, as should have been the case, McClellan crushed Lee at Antietam, the war would have ended on terms that almost certainly would have included the continuation of slavery. If, by some miracle that almost became an actuality, Lee had crashed McClellan, England, France and other European countries would have recognized the Confederacy, the Republicans would have been voted out of Congress in November of 1862, and the Confederacy would have won its independence including the continuation of slavery. Only the actual result, a glorified draw tilting at least strategically to the Union, allowed Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation and end slavery. One wonders if it was not the hand of God that so subtly and delicately balanced the events that slavery might end. But if so, was it also the hand of God that wreaked the harvest of death in Miller's cornfield, that drenched the Blood Lane, and that forced the crossing of the Burnside Bridge?
This novel, apparently the first book of the author, is not as good as The Killer Angels and reveals some rookie errors. Nevertheless, this is required reading for Civil War aficionados.
William Tecumseh Sherman is credited with saying "War is Hell", and in To Make Men Free, Richard Croker has illustrated that truism. Croker's novel covers "America's bloodiest day" from its inception in the strategy of Robert E. Lee, through each and every hour of the battle, to its aftermath. He ably demonstrates the clash of politics and generalship, popularity and competence, arrogance and sincerity. His portrayals of the great men caught up in this battle ring true, despite the necessity of fictionalizing conversations, and he also conveys a sense of the plight of the common soldier around which all the chaos swirled. Croker does a creditable job of enlivening the story of one the most difficult of all Civil War battles to narrate and describe. Recommended to all with an interest in this heartbreaking national conflict.