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The Cradle: A Novel epub

by Patrick Somerville


The Cradle: A Novel epub

ISBN: 0316036110

ISBN13: 978-0316036115

Author: Patrick Somerville

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (April 12, 2010)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB book: 1504 kb

FB2 book: 1206 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 145

Other Formats: lit mbr docx azw





Patrick Somerville's debut novel, The Cradle, like all good novels is many things. It is a simple tale of a man sent on an impossible errand by his pregnant wife. It is a mythic quest complete with trolls, oracles, and demons

Patrick Somerville's debut novel, The Cradle, like all good novels is many things. It is a mythic quest complete with trolls, oracles, and demons. It takes on, no less than, the vast landscape of the Midwest and of the human heart. It tackles questions of family, home, love and cruelty. It is a very short epic.

Somerville at Brooklyn Book Festival 2011. Somerville graduated from Cornell University in 2005. Somerville published his debut novel, The Cradle, in 2009 and his second novel This Bright River in 2012. In 2013, he joined the writing staff of The Bridge, where he wrote two episodes of the series. From 2015-17, he was a writer on the HBO series The. Leftovers. In October 2016, it was announced that Somerville would write the Netflix series Maniac. In December 2017, he signed a deal to develop new TV and digital projects exclusively for Paramount T. .

The Cradle: A Novel Somerville, Patrick Hachette Book Group 9780316036115 : From a writer and producer of HBOs hit apocalyptic . The Cradle: A Novel, Somerville, Patrick. Варианты приобретения.

The Cradle: A Novel Somerville, Patrick Hachette Book Group 9780316036115 : From a writer and producer of HBOs hit apocalyptic drama series The Leftovers, comes a remarkable tale of devoti.

Patrick Somerville grew up in Green Bay, Wisconsin, went to college at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and later earned his MFA in creative writing from CornellUniversity

Patrick Somerville grew up in Green Bay, Wisconsin, went to college at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and later earned his MFA in creative writing from CornellUniversity. He has taught creative writing and English at CornellUniversity, Auburn State Correctional Facility, and The Graham School in Chicago.

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A lovely debut novel, The Cradle is an astonishingly spare tale of feeling lost in the world, and the simple, momentous acts of love that bring people home. Summer 2009 Selection).

At the start of Patrick Somerville’s magical debut novel, a very pregnant woman named Marissa Bishop makes a.

At the start of Patrick Somerville’s magical debut novel, a very pregnant woman named Marissa Bishop makes a request. In the short time before her first baby is due, Marissa would like her husband, Matt, to go find the cradle in which her mother, Caroline, once rocked her. Caroline walked out on her husband and daughter when Marissa was a teenager.

His wife, pregnant with their first child, has asked him to find the antique cradle taken years before by her mother Caroline when she abandoned Marissa, never to contact her daughter again. Soon to be a mother herself, Marissa now dreams of nothing else but bringing her baby home to the cradle she herself slept in.

THE CRADLE, a small but beautiful novel, is wonderfully structured and gorgeously written. The characters are utterly real. You never quite know where it's going. But with Somerville you're in expert hands and by the end, you realize what a master he truly is. 0. Report. The way story telling should be. By Thriftbooks. com User, June 3, 2009.

From a writer and producer of HBO's hit apocalyptic drama series The Leftovers, comes a remarkable tale of devotion, marriage, and parenthood.Early one summer morning, Matthew Bishop kisses his still-sleeping wife Marissa, gets dressed and eases his truck through Milwaukee, bound for the highway. His wife, pregnant with their first child, has asked him to find the antique cradle taken years before by her mother Caroline when she abandoned Marissa, never to contact her daughter again. Soon to be a mother herself, Marissa now dreams of nothing else but bringing her baby home to the cradle she herself slept in. His wife does not know-does not want to know-where her mother lives, but Matt has an address for Caroline's sister near by and with any luck, he will be home in time for dinner.Only as Matt tries to track down his wife's mother, he discovers that Caroline, upon leaving Marissa, has led a life increasingly plagued by impulse and irrationality, a mysterious life that grows more inexplicable with each new lead Matt gains, and door he enters. As hours turn into days and Caroline's trail takes Matt from Wisconsin to Minnesota, Illinois, and beyond in search of the cradle, Matt makes a discovery that will forever change Marissa's life, and faces a decision that will challenge everything he has ever known.Elegant and astonishing, Patrick Somerville tells the story of one man's journey into the heart of marriage, parenthood, and what it means to be a family. Confirming the arrival of an exuberantly talented new writer, THE CRADLE is an uniquely imaginative debut novel that radiates with wisdom and wonder.
I was initially interested because I grew up in Sturgeon Bay, and lived in Green Bay for quite a while. I enjoyed the first half, but like others, had to keep going back (which I hate) to figure out who he was talking about. The ending was okay, but I still wasn't able to shift through some of the characters and figure out if there was a little 5 year old Joe and an older Joe. Very confusing, so I finally gave up and didn't go away with a good feeling. Kind of like I feel after some of Oprah's predictions, which I've since given up on. I did get this off a list from I don't know where, but this is the only one so far I wasn't crazy about....the other ones, The Help, A Reliable Wife, Darlin Jim, Thanks for the Memories, Happens Every Day had me on a roll. This one left me blah. However, it did one thing. Encourage me to take a shot at my own story.
My wife and I read The Cradle which was chosen by our book club as the December book to read. Mary and I felt the same ... the book was O.K. ... not really great and not really terrible ... until the last 15 pages. Then, WOW! The events of the previous pages were tied together beautifully, and we were glad we had read this book. I know for some it is not worth the trouble to read an entire book and not be drawn in until the end. That's why I rated the book four stars rather than five stars.
If a person wants to read just to read this maybe a book for you....the young woman who sends her husband off to find her long lost cradle sends him out to one dumb trip after another..of course, its the husbands choice but there are a few too many side trips
I disagree with reviewers here. Somerville's use of the quest is masterful. In the book, there is literally a quest -- for the cradle -- and as with any good quest tale, there is also the journey toward greater understanding of and peace with one's self. The protagonist meets up with a strange cast of characters, true, but their oddness is in keeping with the story. In addition, some of the descriptions are extremely funny as well as odd. This in a serious book, and one that embraces, ultimately, redemption and renewal. The protagonist's story is entwined with that of a second main character; I don't want to reveal too much, so I'll simply say that this second thread works within the story itself and also, because this second character is a writer, serves to comment on the book as a whole. In other words, within this novel there are aspects of quest, journey, and the notion of process itself (whether creative, procreative, or personal). For me, the journey with the main character was fulfilling and quiet, and so moving that at a crisis point, where from page to page there is a moment of uncertainty as to how something had been resolved, I found my hands shaking. The writing is clean and spare, for the most part. Read carefully and you'll see how this is so, and to what great effect it has been used. Beautiful book.
Patrick Somerville's debut novel, The Cradle, like all good novels is many things. It is a simple tale of a man sent on an impossible errand by his pregnant wife. It is a mythic quest complete with trolls, oracles, and demons. It takes on, no less than, the vast landscape of the Midwest and of the human heart. It tackles questions of family, home, love and cruelty. It is a very short epic. With wry humor and precise language it asks these questions including, rather tongue in cheek like, whether mythic stories are still valid or important for a world that has grown up. What is surprising is that it answers as many questions as it asks, although not always the same ones. By the end of the second chapter you think you know what will happen, but you keep reading because the prose is crisp and the pacing is good. You keep reading because the main character is so likable. And then you realize that everything you thought would happen doesn't. Not really. Somerville masterfully uses our own expectations in service of his story and at the end we wonder: how did he do that?

This novel can be read quickly but shouldn't be. It is, after all only 224 pages, so take your time. You won't be disappointed. You will, in fact, find more of yourself in there than you think possible.
I enjoyed Patrick Somerville's twist and turns and curves he sent our way as we tried to follow these different lives. He spun a tale that kept me coming back to solve the puzzle: how do all these people fit together? My book group loved this book, though some felt it had unanswered questions.."Who took the cradle?" or "Did it matter?". I thought the prose was enticing and easy flowing, kept me engrosed, thanks Mr. Somerville!
My wife read the book, and like it.
A poignant story, unlike any I've read. It starts out with the whim of a young pregnant woman and her husband's desire to please her, but it turns into much more than that. It's a love story in every way.