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Batman: Murder at Wayne Manor: An Interactive Mystery (Interactive Mysteries) epub

by David Lapham,Duane Swierczynski


Batman: Murder at Wayne Manor: An Interactive Mystery (Interactive Mysteries) epub

ISBN: 1594742375

ISBN13: 978-1594742378

Author: David Lapham,Duane Swierczynski

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Quirk Books; Ina edition (July 14, 2008)

Pages: 72 pages

ePUB book: 1318 kb

FB2 book: 1213 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 694

Other Formats: mobi rtf doc docx





Duane Swierczynski is the author of several crime novels as well as The Crimes of Dr. Watson, an interactive Sherlock Holmes mystery. He lives in Philadelphia.

Duane Swierczynski is the author of several crime novels as well as The Crimes of Dr. David Lapham is an award-winning comics writer and artist whose works include Stray Bullets, Murder Me Dead, and Batman: City of Crime.

When a construction crew at Wayne Manor discovers a long-buried corpse. Duane Swierczynski is the author of several crime novels as well as The Crimes of Dr. Watson, Quirk's interactive Sherlock Holmes mystery. David Lapham is an award-winning comics writer and artist whose works include Stray Bullets and Murder Me Dead. Series: Interactive Mysteries.

As an interactive mystery it was pretty easy to solve, but the process was well done.

Batman: Murder at Wayne Manor: An Interactive Mystery. Final thought: the combination of Swierczynski’s writing, Lapham’s illustrations, and the feelies justify the book’s purchase, but I can’t help but think that this really should be given or received as a gift. As an interactive mystery it was pretty easy to solve, but the process was well done. The inserts and "clues" given in all the pockets throughout definitely made it more interesting. I also liked what was done with the characters throughout.

by Duane Swierczynski. Murder at the Mansion. Can you solve the crime? Â For generations, the people of Gotham City have looked to Wayne Manor as the embodiment of wealth and high society. But when construction crews dis. ore

by Duane Swierczynski. ore. Shelve Batman: Murder at Wayne Manor: An Interactive Mystery (Interactive Mysteries).

Written by Duane Swierczynski. Written by Duane Swierczynski. In the tradition of Quirk's The Crimes of Dr. Watson, this interactive mystery pits a legendary detective - Batman - against a shocking and seemingly inexplicable crime. When a construction crew at Wayne Manor discovers a long-buried corpse, all the evidence points to Bruce Wayne's late father, Thomas, as the murderer.

Murder at the Mansion. Dr. Can you solve the crime? For generations, the people of Gotham City have looked to Wayne Manor as the embodiment of wealth and high society. Duane Swierczynskiis the author of several crime novels as well as The Crimes of Dr. David Laphamis an award-winning comics writer and artist whose works include Stray Bullets, Murder Me Dead, and Batman: City of Crime. 1594742375, 9781594742378.

I finally got a chance to sample Batman: Murder at Wayne Manor, one of Quirk Books’ interactive mysteries that feature replica artifacts. It’s written by Duane Swierczynski, as was The Crimes of Dr. Watson, but as suits the main character, there are also comic-style illustrations by David Lapham. The plot here seems the best integrated with the licensed property of the three books in the series. Along with the Holmes one, there’s also Dracula’s Heir, by another author. Bruce Wayne is having his lawn repaired after damaging it while digging out the Batcave

Did you know that Duane Swierczynski and David Lapham teamed for a Batman story? .

Did you know that Duane Swierczynski and David Lapham teamed for a Batman story? Steve Ekstrom takes a look. This summer, Quirk Books, along with DC Comics, released Batman: Murder at Wayne Manor-an interactive mystery that immerses the reader into an ongoing investigation with facsimiles of the evidence introduced during the story. Written by crime novel author Duane Swierczynski with artwork provided by award winning comic book writer/ artist David Lapham, Murder at Wayne Manor leads readers on a path of mystery and intrigue dating back 30 years with the prime suspect being none other than Bruce Wayne’s own father, Thomas.

This interactive mystery pits a legendary inst a shocking and seemingly inexplicable crime. It's up to the reader to sift through the clues and solve this thrilling whodunit. 3 people like this topic.

In the tradition of Quirk's The Crimes of Dr. Watson, this interactive mystery pits a legendary detective—Batman—against a shocking and seemingly inexplicable crime.

When a construction crew at Wayne Manor discovers a long-buried corpse, all the evidence points to Bruce Wayne's late father, Thomas, as the murderer. Torn between the need to protect his father's honor and his thirst for dispensing justice, Batman sets out to solve this coldest of cases, using police reports, his father's private journal, maps of Wayne Manor, news clippings, forensic samples, and photographs from family albums (all included throughout the book as removable facsimiles).

Was Dr. Wayne—whom young Bruce Wayne swore to avenge on that bloody night in Gotham City—actually a killer? It's up to you to sift through the clues and solve this thrilling whodunit. When you've identified the culprit, you can open the final signature of the book (sealed at the printer) to read the remainder of the story. Complete with eye-popping illustrations and first-rate production values, Batman: Murder at Wayne Manor will appeal to mystery buffs of all ages.

All in all, others have done a great job of summing up what makes this little page-turner fun. In the same way that Mr. Swierczynski gave the reader a chance to try their hand at playing Sherlock Holmes' game in The Crimes of Dr. Watson, here we get the chance to follow along as Batman, the Detective of Detective Comics and arguably the most intelligent man in the DC Universe, digs into his own family's past in order to solve a decades-old murder case. It's particularly interesting (and fun for Bat-fans) that about half the investigation is done via Bruce Wayne talking to his Gotham society friends. The clues are good, and the tactile side of, say, turning over a bar coaster to see what's written on its back, is just as pleasing here as the envelopes and photographs found in the little pockets and compartments of the author's previous outing. These books are part puzzle, part scavenger hunt, and great fun for a lazy weekend afternoon.

But just as one thing about the Holmes book didn't sit right with the mystery fan in me*, there is an important section here that falls flat. The problem is a structural one; maybe the author felt it was a bit of sleight-of-hand that would be satisfying. Once the "trick" is revealed, it feels very much like a cheat, and something that, if played straight, would pretty much expose the solution before the end of the story. I was disappointed, and it diminished the quality of the mystery side of things, for me.

This may constitute a SPOILER so by all means STOP READING NOW if you intend to work your way through the story and want to attack it fresh.

Without being too specific, there is an interview at a critical point of the investigation which appears to point solidly in a specific direction. The impact of this is totally undermined later, when it is revealed that there was a previous conversation, which happened off the page, that utterly changes the meaning of what the reader witnesses. And this isn't anything like a torn-out journal page, or a missing police report; the fake-out is in the narrative itself, as it's being presented to the reader. It's not anything we could possibly be expected to know, or look for, because it's not part of the story at all until it's revealed later.

I'd consider it a cardinal rule of mystery writing that the detective narrator and the reader should, at all times, have access to the same information. The exception might be those times it serves the story or increases the sense of tension if the reader is aware of some impending threat or parallel action taking place while the detective is kept in the dark. For the detective to know something that matters, and which is kept from the reader for no reason except to add confusion and obscurity, I'm afraid I can't think of that as anything but simply poor mystery-writing.

The fact that I was so disappointed about this is testament to how much I'd been enjoying the interactive story up until then. Swierczynski has a good handle on both the Batman and the Bruce Wayne sides of things, and there are lots of small character touches and details that reveal he's a knowledgeable fan. Unfortunately, in failing to construct the mystery in a satisfying way, and in resorting to "aha, wait, what you didn't know was THIS!" as a tactic, he stumbles. This particular story is one that not even the World's Greatest Detective could have solved, given the evidence as it was presented**.

* Without spoiling too much, I'll just say that anagrams can be tricky, and Mr. Swierczynski seemed to me to be reaching with this one.

** Except of course that it's a fundamental law that Batman Always Wins. Better to say that the rest of us, having been essentially misled rather than given a set of clues to interpret, have a valid objection to make.
Enjoyed this book very much. In came in the condition I expected. Might purchase another. If you're looking for a fun Batman novel, I'd recommend this one!
I've never take time to write reviews but this book was worth it. I read a lot of Batman novels & this was a cut above the rest. I could not put it down wondering what the twist and turn would be. If you are a fan of mystery novels or Batman comics you will LOVE this book.
Great read with cool extras
I received the item just in time for Christmas like I was hoping even though the expected arrival date was several days after Christmas. The item was in perfect condition just like it was described. The person loved the book and I would definately do business with them again.
Younger readers will love this interactive mystery but most adults will not be challenged by it.
This is not the least bit interactive. It's a linear story, with some clues that you can pull out of an envelope, that factor into the experience in almost no way but reiterating the information on the pages, or giving you a picture. They even tell you the end before the revealing final letter (which was missing from my book).
After starting out with an interesting premise (a cold case at Wayne manor, was Thomas to blame?) the murder holds no real twists or shockers if you know who the Black Mask is. There is very little evidence to even suggest it was Thomas Wayne to cause tension. Batman is a super reflective, very boring guy. He's not any of the Batman's I've read/watched and loved. Worst purchase in my after-Christmas shopping - worst Bat-product I've come across so far in life.
in a sentence or so: a twenty year old skeleton surfaces at Wayne Manor wearing only a costume mask and bearing an invitation to a party hosted by Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Wayne.

Bruce Wayne took up the mantle of Batman and started his protection of the people of Gotham after his parents were murdered when he was a young boy. Bruce always believed his parents were genuine, helpful philanthropists who poured their hearts into Gotham and were committed to making it a better place for everyone. he has always believed the very best of his parents...before he found the body on his lawn. the body of a girl who people suspected Thomas Wayne had an affair with while she worked at Wayne Enterprises. is his father the man Bruce always thought he was? or was he hiding something dangerous and disappointing from those he loved?

okay, by far the coolest thing about this book are the clues. oh that's right. there are CLUES in the book. pieces of the investigation that Batman finds while trying to find out who the woman who surfaced on Wayne Manor is and why she's ended up on the lawn. a notecard found on the body gets Batman started on his investigation.
throughout the investigation, Batman discovers more and more hidden secrets about his family, and so do you.

throughout it all, you're reading from Bruce's point of view (first person) and nails his voice perfectly. the intelligence, dedication, and the focus of Batman are there, but there's also the personal frustrations of a son who didn't know his parents as well as he thought he did. we see a more introspective side of Bruce, and i loved it.

the clues, the investigation, and the full color pages keep this story moving and keep you wanting to solve the mystery and propel you forward into the wee hours of the night to find out who was buried on Wayne Manor, and why.

fave quote: "People claim to read and enjoy mysteries for the whodunnit factor - figuring out the identity of the killer behind the mask. But to me, infinitely more interesting is the why: the chain of events, the personal apocalypses, the miniature tragedies that lie at the root of all crimes." (50)

fix er up: the re-readability of this one isn't super high for me, but it's definitely one i can lend out to peeps.

title: Batman: Murder at Wayne Manor
author: Duane Swierczynski
illustrator: David Lapham
publishing info: Quirk Publishing, 2008