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Carry the One: A Novel epub

by Renee Raudman,Carol Anshaw


Carry the One: A Novel epub

ISBN: 1452655855

ISBN13: 978-1452655857

Author: Renee Raudman,Carol Anshaw

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (March 6, 2012)

ePUB book: 1681 kb

FB2 book: 1253 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 986

Other Formats: docx rtf txt mobi





Carry the One: A Novel. Written by Carol Anshaw. Narrated by Renee Raudman.

Carry the One: A Novel. Carry the One begins in the hours following Carmen's wedding reception, when a car filled with stoned, drunk, and sleepy guests accidently hits and kills a girl on a dark, country road. For the next twenty-five years, those involved, including Carmen and her brother and sister, connect and disconnect and reconnect with each other and their victim.

In Carol Anshaw’s novel, a fatal accident becomes a lasting and looming shadow in the . Books Books of The Times. One Death That Haunts Many Lives. The novel’s title comes from the emotional arithmetic connecting the characters - and Casey - after that night.

In Carol Anshaw’s novel, a fatal accident becomes a lasting and looming shadow in the lives of the friends and lovers involved. Carry the One,’ a Novel by Carol Anshaw. By michiko kakutanimarch 12, 2012. Because of the accident, Alice observes, we’re not just separate numbers.

In Carol Anshaw’s novel, the lives of a group of friends are altered by a fatal accident. A very good book is not only more satisfying, memorable and coherent than its lesser neighbors on the shelves. It’s also more relaxing to read. That wary inhalation as you take in the first lines - Will I believe in these characters?

Carry the One will lift readers off their feet and bear them along on its eloquent tide. Carol Anshaw is the author of Aquamarine, Seven Moves, and Lucky in the Corner.

Carry the One will lift readers off their feet and bear them along on its eloquent tide. Carry the One begins in the hours following Carmen’s wedding reception, when a car filled with stoned, drunk, and sleepy guests accidentally hits and kills a girl on a dark country road. For the next twenty-five years, those involved, including Carmen and her brother and sister, craft their lives in response to this single tragic moment.

Читает Renée Raudman. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента.

Narrated by Renée Raudman. Include any personal information. Mention spoilers or the book's price. 0) 50 characters minimum. Carry the One begins in the hours following Carmen's wedding reception, when a car filled with stoned, drunk, and sleepy guests.

DanieXJ: Both of these Carol Anshaw books take a look at life from a variety of points of view and yet have a plot .

DanieXJ: Both of these Carol Anshaw books take a look at life from a variety of points of view and yet have a plot throughout as well and don't get lost in the philosophizing. 0 0. The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud (jayne charles). Carry the One begins in the hours following Carmen's wedding reception, when a car filled with stoned, drunk, and sleepy guests accidentally hits and kills a girl on a dark country road. For the next twenty-five years those involved, including Carmen and her brother and sister, connect and disconnect and reconnect with one another and their victim.

Narrated by: Renée Raudman. I started a few books but lost interest and it was difficult to finish. this was not the case here. Length: 9 hrs and 11 mins. Categories: Fiction, Contemporary. Carry the One begins in the hours following Carmen's wedding reception, when a car filled with stoned, drunk, and sleepy guests accidently hits and kills a girl on a dark country road. For the next 25 years, those involved, including Carmen and her brother and sister, connect, disconnect, and reconnect with one another and their victim. The author writes with a vivid prose and chooses unique analagies.

Carol Anshaw has a masterful way with words. The story is beautifully written, with characters that come across as genuine and descriptive turns of phrase. Though she never attempts to follow a precise timeline, the passage of time and the changes that occur during them come across clear enough. The end result is a novel where it appears that Anshaw is picking out the moments that we must see, the significant ones, the ones that really matter. The book chronicles the journey, mainly of the three siblings, as they carry the "one" with them all their lives

Entertainment Weekly (Bullseye), "Carol Anshaw is one of those authors who should be a household name (in literature-loving homes, anyway). There's a good chance that her latest novel, Carry the One, will make that happen. USA Today, "Graceful and compassionate.

Entertainment Weekly (Bullseye), "Carol Anshaw is one of those authors who should be a household name (in literature-loving homes, anyway). Writing with rueful wit and a subtle understanding of the currents and passions that rule us, Anshaw demonstrates that struggling to do one's best, whatever the circumstances, makes for a life of consequence.

Carry the One begins in the hours following Carmen's wedding reception, when a car filled with stoned, drunk, and sleepy guests accidently hits and kills a girl on a dark, country road. For the next twenty-five years, those involved, including Carmen and her brother and sister, connect and disconnect and reconnect with each other and their victim. As one character says, "When you add us up, you always have to carry the one."Through friendships and love affairs; marriage and divorce; parenthood, holidays, and the modest tragedies and joys of ordinary days, Carry the One shows how one life affects another and how those who thrive and those who self-destruct are closer to each other than we'd expect. Deceptively short and simple in its premise, this novel derives its power and appeal from the author's beautifully precise use of language; her sympathy for her very recognizable, flawed characters; and her persuasive belief in the transforming forces of time and love.
In March 2013, the book discussion group met at The LGBT Center in NYC to discuss this book. We had a small group that generally agreed that it's a good novel but not a terrific novel. Esther and I seemed to like it more than some of the other readers. We thought that much of the language was simple and concise, but offered big emotional impacts. Language and terms about addiction and astronomy are slipped in (if you start to notice them) but resonant throughout. Others thought that the language was too simple and straightforward. Some liked the interconnected stories but others wanted more complex stories: more detail about the individual lives, more connection between the initial horrifying accident and the lives that the characters lived, more analysis and cause-and-effect. We were all, however, able to point out individual sentences that we thought were spectacular.

We did question some of the minor characters (such as Carmen's dog, Walter) and carefully described events (such as visit to the Paris hammam). We all agreed that the love affair between Alice and Maude was the main action of the novel, and that the affair with Diane (the doctor) at the end seemed rushed and maybe creepy. We also talked about why Olivia, the driver during the accident, is such a minor character in the novel.

Then we discussed the final sentence. Several readers didn't notice it and then didn't think it was significant but several of us thought that it's absolutely important and subtly changes the entire novel, although we couldn't quite decide how. (If you don't get what I'm talking about, re-read the chapter "The Excellent Sandwich" and then the final chapter "The Opposite of Iceland," paying careful attention to the clothes.) This is why you come to a book group and discuss a novel.

We also talked about modern novels, such as those written by Jonathan Franzen and Stephen King, that have large scopes and a huge number of vaguely related characters (such as this novel) rather than older, more focused novels (such as "Maurice" and "Giovanni's Room," which we just read). We also compared it to Iris Murdock novels, which are equally built on dramatic events but seem bigger and better. Readers in this group don't seem to like these modern novels as much as they like more "classic" fiction.
This beautiful and tenderhearted book (all her books are tenderhearted, even at their most drily ironic) joins elegance of structure with a subtle, oblique scrutiny of the dissimilar trajectories through adulthood of three emotionally interdependent siblings, and the friends and lovers who were involved in the terrible accident that ends the first chapter. The magic is declared in the book's title: it describes both the device by which the reader journeys from chapter to chapter, and the special sort of narrative time-travel (skipping whole years in a single leap) that allows us to experience a quarter century of growing up (or failing to do so) for the many characters in this story. I thought Anshaw performed an amazing feat in the unobtrusive, restrained way she gave life to the one character who was robbed of her future right at the start of the book. In the last chapter, Anshaw gives us (or I should say, Olivia, who alone did time for the child's death, and is rendered as an especially closed, opaque personality) a small miracle, a consoling touch whose mystery has been fully earned over the length of the story. Alice, the sister who paints, is a surrogate for the novelist, who captures, and blesses her human creatures (and a couple of dogs) with a patient accumulation of small, attentive touches. Anshaw's books are all about family (even when the family is broken or--as in this book--frayed), about the mismatch between love and passion, and about the rueful, sometimes anxious acknowledgement that we're hopelessly fallible. They're also about the mysteries of time. In Anshaw's world, art (the writer's art especially) is redemptive--and the writing is pitch-perfect.
Wow. I loved this book.

Late one night, after Carmen's wedding reception, a car containing several stoned wedding guests, including her siblings, Alice and Nick; her new sister-in-law (and Alice's girlfriend), Maude; Nick's new girlfriend, Olivia; and Tom, an aspiring singer and sometime-boyfriend of one of Carmen's friends, accidentally hits and kills a young girl on a dark country road. The accident affects each of them differently, but sticks with each of them for the rest of their lives. Carry the One follows Nick, Alice, and Carmen over a period of 25 years, as they struggle with love, relationships, marriage, raising children, career success, political activism, and the pull of addiction. The book deals with the heavy issues--loving your parents despite your "childhood from hell," letting an addict hit rock bottom without trying to save them, fighting not to love someone you know will hurt you repeatedly--but just as deftly deals with the humor, pathos, and delights of everyday life.

What I loved so much about this book is how quickly I was hooked into the characters' lives. I understood what motivated them, what made them happy or disappointed them, what they wanted most from life, and what their fears were. Even if I couldn't completely sympathize with each of the characters throughout the entire book (Carmen, in particular, can be more prickly than Nick or Alice), I felt totally immersed in the flow of the story and the way their lives progressed. And while this book isn't without its drama, some of the quieter moments are so beautifully written. I've seen some fantastic reviews of this book and a lot of lukewarm reviews (although it appears some of those stem from confusion about the plot), but I can unequivocally say this has been one of the best books I've read so far this year.
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