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Murders in the Rue Morgue & Other Stories (Pulp Fictions) epub

by Edgar Allan Poe


Murders in the Rue Morgue & Other Stories (Pulp Fictions) epub

ISBN: 190205802X

ISBN13: 978-1902058023

Author: Edgar Allan Poe

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Pulp Pub; New Ed edition (February 1, 1999)

Pages: 322 pages

ePUB book: 1296 kb

FB2 book: 1879 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 495

Other Formats: lrf mobi mbr txt





Detectives are men and women whose job it is to solve crimes like murder. Enjoy what many consider to be the first big detective story in the first of five parts of this classic American short story by Edgar Allen Poe.

Detectives are men and women whose job it is to solve crimes like murder. There are many famous detectives, but in the real world and in stories.

Here are my thoughts on the stories: "Murders in the Rue Morgue" -I love a good detective story, and this is the first detective story, and that is to be celebrated. I saw a lot of Sherlock Holmes in C. Auguste Dupin and Watson in his anonymous friend. It was a great mystery with a crazy resolution.

The complete, unabridged text of The Murders in the Rue Morgue by. .We saw each other again and again.

The complete, unabridged text of The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe, with vocabulary words and definitions. I was deeply interested in the little family history which he detailed to me with all that candor which a Frenchman indulges whenever mere self is his theme.

Between 1841 and 1844, Edgar Allan Poe invented the detective fiction genre with his mesmerizing stor. Years later, Dorothy Sayers would describe "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" as "almost a complete manual of detective theory and practice

Between 1841 and 1844, Edgar Allan Poe invented the detective fiction genre with his mesmerizing stor. Years later, Dorothy Sayers would describe "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" as "almost a complete manual of detective theory and practice. Indeed, Poe's short mysteries inspired the creation of countless literary sleuths, among them Sherlock Holmes. Today, the Dupin stories still stand out as unique and utterly engrossing.

The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in Graham's Magazine in 1841. It has been recognized as the first modern detective story; Poe referred to it as one of his "tales of ratiocination"

The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in Graham's Magazine in 1841. It has been recognized as the first modern detective story; Poe referred to it as one of his "tales of ratiocination". C. Auguste Dupin is a man in Paris who solves the mystery of the brutal murder of two women. At the murder scene, Dupin finds a hair that does not appear to be human.

The Tragedy in the Rue Morgue. Many individuals have been examined in relation to this most extraordinary and frightful affair

The Tragedy in the Rue Morgue. Many individuals have been examined in relation to this most extraordinary and frightful affair. but nothing whatever has transpired to throw light upon it. We give below all the material testimony elicited. Pauline Dubourg, laundress, deposes that she has known both the deceased for three years, having washed for them during that period. The old lady and her daughter seemed on good terms - very affectionate towards each other.

Edgar Allan Poe is the true grandfather of the murder mystery. Decades before Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot, Poe gave us C. Auguste Dupin, a man able to solve mysteries through observation and deduction. This is fiction noir in the true sense, set in the dark back streets of 1840s Paris. Other stories in this book include "Murders in the Rue Morgue", "The Purloined Letter", "The Thousand-and-Second Tale of Scheherazade", "A Descent into the Maelstrom", "The Raven", and "The Masque of the Red Death". 50 Classic Thriller Short Stories.

Edgar Allan Poe, the troubled genius of 19th century American literature, brought him to life . Dupin is regarded as the first detective (despite not being an actual detective) in the history of literature and The Murders in the Rue Morgue the first detective story.

Edgar Allan Poe, the troubled genius of 19th century American literature, brought him to life in three short stories: The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841), The Mystery of Marie Rogêt (1842) and The Purloined Letter (1844). When Poe penned his stories, the word detective did not even exist in the sense that it is used today. It’s a very simple story but Edger Allen Poe has such a deft skill as a writer that it feels perfectly crafted even if the solution is revealed almost immediately after the mystery is presented.

Between 1841 and 1844, Edgar Allan Poe invented the detective fiction genre with his mesmerizing . Years later, Dorothy Sayers would describe "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" as "almost a complete manual of detective theory and practice

Between 1841 and 1844, Edgar Allan Poe invented the detective fiction genre with his mesmerizing stories of a young French eccentric named C. Auguste Dupin.

1st Pulp Fictions trade edition paperback new In stock shipped from our UK warehouse
In the views of many critics, C. Auguste Dupin is the template for all the thousands of private detectives in fiction. Edgar Allan Poe, the troubled genius of 19th century American literature, brought him to life in three short stories: “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841), “The Mystery of Marie Rogêt” (1842) and “The Purloined Letter” (1844).

When Poe penned his stories, the word “detective” did not even exist in the sense that it is used today. Now, the Mystery Writers of America present annual awards, the Edgars, named in honor of the inventor of the detective story.

“The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” the first and best of Poe’s three famous detective stories, was published in April 1841 in Graham’s Magazine, owned by a Philadelphia lawyer, George Graham. Poe was then working as the editor of the literary magazine, which had a circulation of only around 5,000, but due to Poe’s reputation as a biting literary critic and the author of some of the most famous poems and short stories of the first half of the 19th century the magazine’s impact on the literary world was much greater than its circulation numbers would suggest.

Auguste Dupin is a Parisian, an aristocrat who comes from a wealthy family but who through untoward circumstances has been reduced to near-poverty. He lives with the unnamed narrator in a flat in an old mansion. The two have little money to spare, with their only luxuries being old books. That common interest is how the two met, when both were searching for a rare volume in an obscure library in Montmartre.
Dupin is introduced as a man of analytical mind, “fond of enigmas, of conundrums, hieroglyphics.” As Sherlock Holmes would do later with Watson, Dupin is able to deduce what his friend the narrator is thinking by putting together a series of clues.

The character of Auguste Dupin is thought to have been based on Eugène François Vidocq (1775-1857), a French criminal who reformed and became the founder and first head of the Sûreté Nationale, the state security police. Later, Vidocq established the world’s first private detective agency, Le bureau des renseignements (Office of Information). Vidocq is considered by many to be the father of modern criminology. Poe likely saw a series of articles on Vidocq published in Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine, another Philadelphia literary magazine that Poe briefly edited.
In “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” the narrator and Dupin discuss newspaper accounts of the brutal murders of a mother and daughter. The body of the mother, Madame L’Expanaye, had been found in the yard behind their apartment building in Quartier St. Roch, with multiple bones broken and her throat cut so deeply that when police try to move the body her head falls off. A tuft of reddish hair is clutched in her dead hand. Her daughter has been strangled and her body stuffed upside down in a chimney in the flat. The door and windows of the fourth-floor room on Rue Morgue where the murders took place were closed and locked. This street did not actually exist in Paris at the time, but a place where dead bodies are kept was the perfect title for the story.

Four thousand French francs in gold (around $8,000 in today’s money) had been delivered from a bank three days before the murders, but the gold had not been taken, so robbery was ruled out as a motive. Neighbors and passersby, including a Spaniard, an Englishman, a Dutchman, an Italian and a Frenchman, were interviewed. They had not seen anyone enter or leave the apartment. They all heard a man speaking French, but they could not agree on what language was spoken by the presumed murderer. Despite a lack of evidence, a bank clerk, Adolphe Le Bon, who had arranged the delivery of the gold francs was arrested for the murders. Le Bon had once done a good deed for Dupin, so the French aristocrat decides to solve the crime and get the bank clerk set free.

Mostly from information on newspaper reports, with consultation with the Prefect of police, “G-“ and with a visit to the scene of the murders, Dupin is able to determine that the bank clerk had nothing to do with the murders. He concludes that murderer (now so well known that there is no need to avoid giving away the ending) in fact is an "Ourang-Outang" or orangutan kept by a sailor. Dupin places an advertisement in a newspaper asking the owner to claim the animal. It turns out that the primate escaped from its locked room ran away from its owner, carrying a straight razor that it had seen the sailor use, committed the murders and escaped through a fourth-story window, with the spring-loaded sash closing on its own. Under French law of the time, neither the orangutan nor its owner could be held responsible. The wrongly arrested bank clerk is released. The sailor sells the ape and goes his way. Dupin, despite his poverty, refuses to accept an offer of a reward from the sailor.
“The Murders in the Rue Morgue” likely derives from Poe’s recollection of the display of an orangutan at the Masonic Hall in Philadelphia in July 1839.

The story ends with a quote from Rousseau in French (Poe was fluent in French) about the incompetent Prefect of Police G-, whom Dupin believe to be “too cunning to be profound:” “de nier ce qui est, et d'expliquer ce qui n'est pas” (“to deny that which is, and explore that which is not.”
The Murders in the Rue Morgue is a very small short story that was originally published in Graham’s Magazine back in 1841. You could scarcely find a simpler plot. Two women are violently murdered in their own apartment by a killer whose entrance and escape seem impossible. Several male voices are heard during the time of the murder, one of which speaks in a language that none of the witnesses can identify. C. Auguste Dupin and his associate travel to the murder scene and solve the mystery.

Dupin is regarded as the first detective (despite not being an actual detective) in the history of literature and The Murders in the Rue Morgue the first detective story. It’s a very simple story but Edger Allen Poe has such a deft skill as a writer that it feels perfectly crafted even if the solution is revealed almost immediately after the mystery is presented. Poe would use Dupin in several more stories and he is likely the inspiration from some of literatures most acclaimed sleuths including Sherlock Holmes who first appeared in 1887.

I really enjoyed the story and it can be easily read in its entirety in a single sitting over a coffee drink. If you don’t like it, well, you won’t have spent much time from your life.
Not the literary classic I was hoping it to be. That said, I clearly see Poe's influence on the true early giants of the mystery genre. A few re-reads my manifest a fourth-star, but upon a first reading three is all I can muster.
Poe's story has one of the first "detective" in literature. M. Dupin looks at the situation, follows the clues, and comes up with the true murderer. Today, detectives supported their suppositions with fingerprints, DNA, and complicated lab procedures. It was interesting to see the murder solved by deduction.
The book holds its own after all these years. Edgar Allen Poe is a genius. The story is magical and engaging
Just one question: my copy has a very poor contrast, making reading dificult.
Other e-books OK. I think the same is occuring with THE MYSTERY OF MARIE ROGET.
It looks like there is a bakground color, instead of black ink over a white sheet.
Any help ?
The book shipped on time and was a good short story read, similar to the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle style of writing.
Poe's character, Auguste Dupin, is the original ecentric detective. Conan Doyle copied him in his writings of Sherlock Holmes. Doyle used the same writing style, story set-ups and even copied some of Poe's plots. The Dupin stories
were written forty years before Holmes.